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Old 12-06-2019, 12:42 PM
 
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Well I think that’s where things also get hairy. Sitting down and watching a show on tv seems different than doing an activity on an iPad. But both are considered screen time.
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Old 12-06-2019, 12:49 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bridge781 View Post
My DH also has the kids watching more tv than I would like. He is with them after school and turns the tv on for 30 to 60 minutes.
Is he watching it together with them? Does he need the time to do chores around the house?

Seems like a mountain out of a molehill to me. Learning to let yourself relax is a good life skill -- so much of modern life is GO GO GO.
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Old 12-06-2019, 01:23 PM
 
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He normally does it to get things done. Does not watch with them.

We argue over this.
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Old 12-06-2019, 03:10 PM
 
Location: Raleigh
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I'm sure there's a balance to be struck. My parents weren't super strict about screen time, but we only really had one TV in the house, and after Dad got home, the family ate dinner, and we typically had

We never grew up with cable, so when I went off to college and they had cable in the dorms, it was sort of hard to pull away from it for awhile.

My roommates best friend was hanging in our dorm room, and my roommate looked at him one day and said, "Your parent's never let you watch TV did they?" "Huh?"

The kids whose parents never let them watch TV had a hard time turning it off. Oddly enough, the opposite seemed to be true of most video games.

My mom retired recently as a school nurse. She said that there are parents that are totally checked out but that the hardest kids are those whose parents are wound entirely too tight. Her quote to me was "Some of these kids just need to sit down after school with a glass of milk and watch Arthur (PBS show) for an hour or two."
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Old 12-06-2019, 06:04 PM
 
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DD takes my youngest grandson with her to work every day instead of daycare (it's a perk because she runs a business). He's three. He normally plays with Hot Wheels, trucks, lego's, pests her sales help, etc. but keeps himself entertained. DD's not one to let her kids watch much TV, unless it's educational. She's really strict about her "no TV" rule...even when I'm babysitting the kids at the house.

When she really needs some uninterrupted time at work to get things done, she'll give him a tablet and put something learning oriented on for him. However, he's learned to put on YouTube and type in "Blippi". "Blippi" is...weird. He's a cross between Pee Wee Herman and Steve from "Blue's Clues"...a young guy with orange glasses, an orange hat, orange bow tie and suspenders, who moves and jumps around spastically. His show is (somewhat, I guess) educational and intended for kids 2 to 5.

What I found out about "Blippi" when I looked him up was disturbing. In his previous alter life he did some really rude videos on YouTube (involving defecation). Not who I'd want for my child's role model, but my grandson is obsessed with him. I hope it's short lived.
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Old 12-06-2019, 07:02 PM
 
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The solution is simple: we just don't have TV in the house
We have bunch of computers, but that's a different story
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Old 12-07-2019, 08:23 AM
 
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Originally Posted by vision33r View Post
I don't know what is a good time allowed per day since 30mins is too little to get any use out of the session and 4 hours+ is too much. I think the type of on-screen activity should be managed. My oldest son does reasonably well in school and spends about 3 hours a day after school on the iPad or iPhone before he is timed out.
My son spent time after school on his xbox. His school friends would join a game together and would talk over the xbox - all from their own bedrooms. It was sort of a social activity without any physical activity.

It is hard because most boys are involved in sports after school. If they are not playing an organized sport, there isn't much to do after school. In my days, kids came home from school and played outside without parental supervision. I rode my bicycle for hours only coming home for dinner. But those days are long gone. It is sad.
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Old 12-07-2019, 09:25 AM
 
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Originally Posted by kanonka View Post
The solution is simple: we just don't have TV in the house
We have bunch of computers, but that's a different story
Well I enjoy watching tv so that’s not a solution for me.

I guess that’s the attitude I’m talking about. People thinking they’re better because they don’t own a tv.
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Old 12-07-2019, 09:57 AM
 
Location: Texas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bridge781 View Post
My DH also has the kids watching more tv than I would like. He is with them after school and turns the tv on for 30 to 60 minutes.
As others have said, nothing here is inherently bad.

Just control time and content.

My kids don't have time for screens during the week (7, 5). They wake up, eat breakfast, go to school, come home from school (around 3), have after school activities (sports, music), homework, chores, dinner, shower, bed. Free time is usually playing upstairs in the playroom or with me (usually sports or board games). I think free time, especially right after school, is really important. One of my kids likes to be quiet and just play quietly for a little while after all the hullabaloo of a school day. Unwind.

On the weekend, we might watch a movie or they are allowed 30 minutes of whatever screen they want. Or a video game (often we play those together, too).

I don't believe in overscheduling kids, but I also know from experience that you don't NEED screens anywhere (car, restaurants, etc) if you haven't trained them into asking for them.

Your saying that people with no tv are acting like they're better is just your own insecurity manifesting. No one said they are better bc they don't have a tv.
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Old 12-09-2019, 12:01 PM
 
Location: Raleigh
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Originally Posted by stan4 View Post
Your saying that people with no tv are acting like they're better is just your own insecurity manifesting. No one said they are better bc they don't have a tv.
The implication is clearly there. "We don't allow any screen time/TV/Whatever." Ok, why? Is the kid allergic to blue light? No. Does the TV run up the electric bill? No. Can the family not afford a TV? Doubtful.

The rationale is because its bad for kids. Therefore, parents that allow their kids access to something harmful, are worse parents than those that don't.

FWIW I think that it can be harmful and there are parents that way overuse it as a surrogate babysitter and I think that's a mistake, but more from a "teaching good manners" perspective rather than "Damaging their long term prospects to succeed as productive adults" perspective. IE, I see kids that are on the tablet or whatever at dinner that are old enough to sit and participate in dinner with the family.

But if Mom is busy doing what needs to be done there's certainly little harm in turning on a Disney movie for them. This notion that parents must be constantly involved with their kids becomes madness when it encroaches on their time to be the responsible adult doing responsible adult things like cooking or folding laundry or paying bills.
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