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Old 12-26-2019, 07:13 AM
 
Location: A Yankee in northeast TN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nana053 View Post
Interesting: Technology always provokes those who think that we need to stay with what we know.

When cars first came in: "They want to replace some horse-driver jobs with car-driver jobs. The debate is why they would want to destroy jobs?"

From an 1815 Principle's publication

https://www.city-data.com/forum/atta...1&d=1577311351
OTOH we will always have historical documents that were written in cursive. I find it kind of sad that fifty years from now people will look at a copy of the original constitution and it will be like looking at hieroglyphs to them.
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Old 12-26-2019, 10:15 AM
 
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I think there is some value in teaching it for the fine motor skills and due to the way our brain processes information better when we write it vs. type it, etc. However, I don't think it needs to be as emphasized as much as some people might want it to be. People who aren't trained to write in cursive can generally still pick it up enough to read it and sign a name, etc., but it would be a good idea to spend a little time teaching it, imho. People need to realize, however, there is only so much time in a day and everyone's pet projects can't make it into the curriculum for our kids - some things have to go, or be taught by parents who want their kids to know them instead of the ever-increasing demands on our public schools to teach everything from how to sew on a button and do laundry to advanced vocational education and advanced college material.
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Old 12-26-2019, 10:51 AM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
24,279 posts, read 15,689,701 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sundaydrive00 View Post
I'm not sure why your only options for writing a grocery list are either cursive or typing it into your phone. Handwriting is still a thing, even if some kids don't learn the more formal cursive writing. Although I do prefer to type it into my phone, that why I'm not going to misplace it.

Same with leaving a note for a coworker. Why can't notes be writing in print writing instead of cursive?

I don't know anyone who uses perfect cursive for their signature. I think it's better not to so your signature can't be easily duplicated by someone else.
You can do all those things however you want. If you needed to leave a note on someone’s desk as you were leaving work, I think it would be handy to write it on a post it and leave it on a desk. If you need verification that you notified someone, by all means send an email.

I think I acknowledged in my post that there are multiple ways to write.

I find it easier to simply write down a grocery list. But then, I’ve used cursive for my entire life.
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Old 12-26-2019, 11:05 AM
 
4,566 posts, read 3,075,462 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DubbleT View Post
OTOH we will always have historical documents that were written in cursive. I find it kind of sad that fifty years from now people will look at a copy of the original constitution and it will be like looking at hieroglyphs to them.
You are so right.

Yesterday my 10 year old grandson couldn't pass out one of the gifts, he just said Grandma, I don't know how to read cursive. I thought he would still be able to recognize enough letters to get it, but he couldn't. Kind of shocking.
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Old 12-26-2019, 12:10 PM
 
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https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifes...f75_story.html

Quote:
The archive is “sitting on 15 billion pieces of paper and parchment,” says David Ferriero, archivist of the United States, and as much as 80 percent of it is in cursive. With schools today emphasizing keyboarding over handwriting, numerous documents — from the Constitution to the correspondence of Abraham Lincoln to the diary of a Gold Rush traveler — may soon appear as foreign as ancient Sanskrit to most American children. “We’re sacrificing generations of students who won’t be able to read our records,” says Ferriero.
Quote:
In 2011, the Archives launched its Citizen Archivist Dashboard, an online portal where 13,645 people have so far performed some transcription. The Archives also offers learning labs in which visiting students look at a variety of documents, including a 1958 letter that schoolgirls wrote to President Dwight D. Eisenhower asking him not to let the Army cut Elvis Presley’s hair, and a ledger kept by Benjamin Franklin. (One of the funny asides, says Archives education specialist Amber Kraft, is that schoolchildren sometimes ask her whether they have to use cursive if they send letters to the president.)

Last fall, the Library of Congress got into the act, rolling out an initiative called By the People, a website where volunteers can transcribe items such as the journals of African American leader Mary Church Terrell, letters written to Lincoln, or the writings of Civil War veterans who had lost limbs in the conflict. Georgetown University history professor Chandra Manning got her class working on the letters-to-Lincoln project. At first, she says, the students were frustrated, but eventually they got it. “That’s somebody’s actual handwriting there,” she says. “There’s a certain intimacy, of suddenly making a connection with another person across time.”
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Old 12-26-2019, 01:03 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by silibran View Post
You can do all those things however you want. If you needed to leave a note on someone’s desk as you were leaving work, I think it would be handy to write it on a post it and leave it on a desk.
You ignored my question. Why does a post it note left for a co-worker have to be written in cursive? Everyone still knows how to write with pen and paper, even if its not in cursive.
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Old 12-26-2019, 01:31 PM
 
437 posts, read 65,616 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oregonwoodsmoke View Post
I have enough trouble with the post office without none of the clerks being able to read handwriting.

Boy I must be old, never occurred to me there were adults in workaday world that couldnt read cursive. Not that some people's handwriting was ever decipherable. Comedians used to make jokes about doctors handwriting....


So what do people do today for a signature, are we back to the illiterates just making an "X"???? Block printing your name doesnt seem a very effective signature.


There is by way a font that mimics cursive as it used to be taught so if you are really wanting to see things in cursive.... https://www.dafont.com/5th-grade-cursive.font


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Old 12-26-2019, 01:39 PM
 
13,161 posts, read 8,058,281 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HJ99 View Post
So what do people do today for a signature, are we back to the illiterates just making an "X"???? Block printing your name doesn't seem a very effective signature.
I still don't understand why people seem to think you must be taught formal cursive in order to sign your name. I don't know anyone who's signature looks like that. I can read and write cursive just fine, but my signature is not the perfectly formed letters in my name. Anyone can figure out a signature for their name without knowing how to write cursive.
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Old 12-26-2019, 02:39 PM
 
7,096 posts, read 3,338,240 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sundaydrive00 View Post
I still don't understand why people seem to think you must be taught formal cursive in order to sign your name. I don't know anyone who's signature looks like that. I can read and write cursive just fine, but my signature is not the perfectly formed letters in my name. Anyone can figure out a signature for their name without knowing how to write cursive.
Point is ...THIS skill still requires technique for legibility.

And no not "everyone" can figure a signature out.

I spent YEARS perfecting the cursive to proficiency. Actually theorized that those who have poor penmanship are detail challenged .
Bravo for a parent instilling this talent. I'll take a hand written note over a text mssg any day. Personal always supercedes font selectives.
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Old 12-26-2019, 04:17 PM
 
13,161 posts, read 8,058,281 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nov3 View Post
Point is ...THIS skill still requires technique for legibility.

And no not "everyone" can figure a signature out.
A signature is a handwritten depiction of someone's name, or a mark that a person writes on documents as a proof of identity and intent. Handwritten is anything written with a pen, pencil, or other writing device.

Yeah, I think anyone can figure out how to put pen to paper and write their name. Again, there is nothing to require a signature to be perfect formal cursive.
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