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Old 01-23-2020, 07:59 AM
 
768 posts, read 767,535 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Emma_Smith View Post
In the 1930s 40s and 50s the hospitals in New York actively discouraged mothers from breastfeeding. They said things like "it's not enough" or worse... "it's a low class thing to do". Hospitals essentially bullied women into not breastfeeding.
No wonder breastfeeding rates in New York hit rock bottom at just 19%in 1950.

What a contrast to the late 70s,80s and 90s when hospitals in New York practically forced/bullied mothers to breastfeed or "else".
A lot of New Yorkers I speak to in their 30s (85%) say they were breastfed as babies and it really shows in their rounded facial features compared to New Yorkers in their 70s (mostly bottle fed) who just look different aside from their age differences.

Isn't it amazing how hospital advice to mothers in ny turned around so much in just a couple of decades with regards to feeding practices? Share your stories if you can please.
There is no connection between breast feeding and facial shape. That is all.
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Old 01-23-2020, 07:14 PM
 
928 posts, read 348,941 times
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Originally Posted by Emma_Smith View Post
I know this is slightly off topic but to answer your question the facial difference between those that were breastfed and those that weren't is noticeable. I have noticed that millenial new yorkers have these well developed chins and high cheekbones that were common in people born in the early 20th century and before (when breastfeeding was still commonplace)! Meanwhile baby boomers born in New York have these poorly developed chins and often needed braces as children. Again I point this down to the aggressive pro formula campaigns that occurred in NY between 1930 and 1960.
Respectfully, I disagree about people in the 30s with well defined chins - there's plenty of photos of folks from back then with Mitch McConnell chins. It could be argued it's a Kentucky attribute like a Hapsburg chin
But anyway remember beards hid alot of chins on guys too.

I'm not disputing though that the pro-formula campaigns may or may not have caused these chins and bad teeth, though. I just don't think it's provable.

Relative to gen Z, Y, X, and millennial (younger to older), their food was infused with corn, corn and more corn so they're pretty much XL people (shorter life expectancy than boomers too). They look like Michelin men and the extra fat just looks like high cheekbones - that happens with any age, though.
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Old 01-24-2020, 10:21 PM
 
8,068 posts, read 4,299,137 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spazkat9696 View Post
What does this have to do with face shape?
Absolutely NOTHING. I'm still laughing.
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Old Yesterday, 12:58 PM
 
Location: Florida
5,999 posts, read 3,943,542 times
Reputation: 11197
Quote:
Originally Posted by Emma_Smith View Post
I know this is slightly off topic but to answer your question the facial difference between those that were breastfed and those that weren't is noticeable. I have noticed that millenial new yorkers have these well developed chins and high cheekbones that were common in people born in the early 20th century and before (when breastfeeding was still commonplace)! Meanwhile baby boomers born in New York have these poorly developed chins and often needed braces as children. Again I point this down to the aggressive pro formula campaigns that occurred in NY between 1930 and 1960.
My bottlefed son didn't need braces and my breastfed (until she was 3!) daughter desperately needed them. Also, my daughter inherited my husband's angular face, while my son inherited my more rounded one. I think your theory is a bit off, there. LOL
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Old Today, 09:18 PM
 
1,628 posts, read 518,598 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Emma_Smith View Post
. By the late 60s breastfeeding rated had more than doubled (to 40%) in New York because of the creation of the la leche league coupled with the rise of the hippies.


Almost every millenial new yorker was nursed by their mother while they were a baby and almost every new yorker born in the 40s and very early 50s were fed from a bottle and never had a chance to taste even a single drop of mom's milk.

My kids are millennials, New Yorkers and not breastfeed. Wow!

I must know every single bottle kid in NY! Like my friend's son who almost didn't survive. His mom breastfeed but she didn't produce enough milk! He lost too much weight.

Because everyone else was breastfeed. EVERYONE.

Jeez, do you realize like you sound like a teenager trying to convince her parents?
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