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Old 01-10-2020, 01:16 AM
 
Location: The World
50 posts, read 8,617 times
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In the 1930s 40s and 50s the hospitals in New York actively discouraged mothers from breastfeeding. They said things like "it's not enough" or worse... "it's a low class thing to do". Hospitals essentially bullied women into not breastfeeding.
No wonder breastfeeding rates in New York hit rock bottom at just 19%in 1950.

What a contrast to the late 70s,80s and 90s when hospitals in New York practically forced/bullied mothers to breastfeed or "else".
A lot of New Yorkers I speak to in their 30s (85%) say they were breastfed as babies and it really shows in their rounded facial features compared to New Yorkers in their 70s (mostly bottle fed) who just look different aside from their age differences.

Isn't it amazing how hospital advice to mothers in ny turned around so much in just a couple of decades with regards to feeding practices? Share your stories if you can please.
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Old 01-10-2020, 05:59 AM
 
Location: NJ
664 posts, read 219,920 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Emma_Smith View Post
In the 1930s 40s and 50s the hospitals in New York actively discouraged mothers from breastfeeding. They said things like "it's not enough" or worse... "it's a low class thing to do". Hospitals essentially bullied women into not breastfeeding.
No wonder breastfeeding rates in New York hit rock bottom at just 19%in 1950.

What a contrast to the late 70s,80s and 90s when hospitals in New York practically forced/bullied mothers to breastfeed or "else".
A lot of New Yorkers I speak to in their 30s (85%) say they were breastfed as babies and it really shows in their rounded facial features compared to New Yorkers in their 70s (mostly bottle fed) who just look different aside from their age differences.

Isn't it amazing how hospital advice to mothers in ny turned around so much in just a couple of decades with regards to feeding practices? Share your stories if you can please.
This is not or was not a NY based phenomenon. My grandmother in her 70s was breast fed as far as i know. But her children who were born in the 50s and early 60s we fed watered down carnation milk. She was actively discouraged at the hospital and socially to bottle feed. This was in rural NC. She was told that carnation milk was just as good and only poor black women nursed because they couldnt afford the canned milk. I was fed formula in the 80s since the attitudes in the south change very slowly but my sister and myself both breastfed our own children. Never noticed a difference though
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Old 01-10-2020, 07:17 AM
 
Location: The World
50 posts, read 8,617 times
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I know Breastfeeding was still quite common in the south until the early 1950s. The south was behind ny no doubt. In the late 1960s breastfeeding was already becoming more popular in ny state while in the south it was dwindling. By the late 70s breastfeeding rated had reached nearly 70% in New York while in the south it took several decades later for it to realize that statistic.
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Old 01-10-2020, 10:16 AM
 
5,770 posts, read 8,420,855 times
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What does this have to do with face shape?
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Old 01-10-2020, 10:59 AM
 
Location: The World
50 posts, read 8,617 times
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I know this is slightly off topic but to answer your question the facial difference between those that were breastfed and those that weren't is noticeable. I have noticed that millenial new yorkers have these well developed chins and high cheekbones that were common in people born in the early 20th century and before (when breastfeeding was still commonplace)! Meanwhile baby boomers born in New York have these poorly developed chins and often needed braces as children. Again I point this down to the aggressive pro formula campaigns that occurred in NY between 1930 and 1960.
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Old 01-10-2020, 11:05 AM
 
Location: Denver 'burbs
22,138 posts, read 23,741,829 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Emma_Smith View Post
I know this is slightly off topic but to answer your question the facial difference between those that were breastfed and those that weren't is noticeable. I have noticed that millenial new yorkers have these well developed chins and high cheekbones that were common in people born in the early 20th century and before (when breastfeeding was still commonplace)! Meanwhile baby boomers born in New York have these poorly developed chins and often needed braces as children. Again I point this down to the aggressive pro formula campaigns that occurred in NY between 1930 and 1960.
Cite for this?

My guess is the increase in obesity rates have more to do with rounder faces than breastfeeding.

Braces are so commonplace in the US middle class at that they are practically a rite of passage compared to earlier generations for which braces were less common. You might be noticing the results of this - more adults with straighter teeth.

Last edited by maciesmom; 01-10-2020 at 11:21 AM..
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Old 01-10-2020, 11:23 AM
 
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Meh, my mother had seven children between 1947 and 1969, and breastfed all but one. The middle child of the seven was slightly premature, she was a high-strung baby, and for some reason our mom could not get breastfeeding to work for her, so she was formula-fed.

Five of the seven of us needed braces. Breastfeeding made no difference to that. Anecdotal of course, but I'd have to see some legitimate scientific studies showing that breastfed babies are less likely to need braces.
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Old 01-10-2020, 11:33 AM
 
Location: NJ
664 posts, read 219,920 times
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Originally Posted by saibot View Post
Meh, my mother had seven children between 1947 and 1969, and breastfed all but one. The middle child of the seven was slightly premature, she was a high-strung baby, and for some reason our mom could not get breastfeeding to work for her, so she was formula-fed.

Five of the seven of us needed braces. Breastfeeding made no difference to that. Anecdotal of course, but I'd have to see some legitimate scientific studies showing that breastfed babies are less likely to need braces.
https://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-t.../breastfeeding
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Old 01-10-2020, 01:24 PM
 
1,538 posts, read 491,136 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LO28SWM View Post
What nonsense! I was bottle fed and had a perfect bite. My sister was breastfed and had a huge overbite

Quote:
Still, this doesn’t mean your exclusively breastfed baby won’t need braces someday. Other factors, including genetics, pacifier use, and thumbsucking, affect alignment. “Every baby, every child is different,” says Dr. Ruchi Sahota, mother and American Dental Association spokesperson.
Your link is not holding up your 'scientific' claim, it is just propaganda.


We were both born in NYC and the hospitals did not browbeat anyone over breast/bottle feeding in the 1950/60s.


In the 1990's, I had my children in at St. Vincent's in NYC. My beloved obstetrician said infant mortality rates went down when baby formula was introduced. Clean water and baby formula were lifesavers. Far better than relying on a wet nurse. He did not believe in pushing breastfeeding if it wasn't working out.

Quote:
The most recent data shows alarming trends in infant feeding, namely a rise in hospitalizations for feeding complications in exclusively breastfed newborns who don’t receive enough breast milk, including increasing rates of excessive jaundice (hyperbilirubinemia), hypoglycemia, and dehydration, which can threaten a newborn’s brain. All mothers who wish to breastfeed should be supported in doing so while ensuring their child receives all the nutrition they need to remain healthy and safe. However, through our research, clinical practice experience and the countless stories we’ve received since launching this campaign, we have found that mothers often feel immense pressure by society and by current breastfeeding protocols to only breastfeed their newborns, even when they do not have enough milk to do so. When they do, they often cannot gauge if their infants are getting enough. While mothers and health professionals are taught that it is rare to have insufficient breast milk, insufficient breast milk production affects at least 1 in 5 women in the first days of an infant’s life. Without enough milk, infants can starve, and starvation can cause brain injury leading to preventable cognitive and developmental delays and an increased risk of seizure disorders.
I've known a quite a few moms whose children lost weight during their first month of life because these moms couldn't produce enough breastmilk.


The only browbeating breastfeeding person was NYC mayor, Mike Bloomberg. He requested hospitals lock up baby formula as if it was a dangerous drug.
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Old 01-10-2020, 01:26 PM
Status: "Happy Hollydaze" (set 21 days ago)
 
Location: Tucson Arizona
4,238 posts, read 1,900,550 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Emma_Smith View Post
A lot of New Yorkers I speak to in their 30s (85%) say they were breastfed as babies and it really shows in their rounded facial features compared to New Yorkers in their 70s (mostly bottle fed) who just look different aside from their age differences.
Younger people tend to have rounder faces. As you age, the fat deposits disappear.
I always had chipmunk cheeks until a few years ago.

So comparing young and old people is not good science.
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