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Old 02-24-2020, 08:18 AM
Status: "The ministers cat is an exhausted cat" (set 23 days ago)
 
Location: NJ
1,057 posts, read 363,411 times
Reputation: 3602

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https://www.parents.com/baby-names/i...?utm=newsbreak

Quote:
Rather than opting for creative spellings, like all the Xzaviars and Jaydyns out there, it seems this new wave of parents is crafting their own new names—like Sylvalie and Albion— to avoid the dreaded Aidan R. and Emma B. issue.

I MUCH prefer interesting made up names over the infinite and quite frankly sometimes stupid spellings of common names.

But too be fair, is there a name in existence that isnt "made up"?


The list made up boys names includes Brigham and Charleston though which...Brigham Young University and CHarleston South Carolina might disagree that its made up.

Have you heard any interesting names? A girl at my sons school is named D'Ashley which i dont care for much.
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Old 02-24-2020, 09:05 AM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
89,906 posts, read 106,897,840 times
Reputation: 35534
Not a great article. They include "Albion" in the "made-up names", yet I'd heard it before. I looked it up and found this:
"Albion is an alternative name for the island of Great Britain. It is sometimes used poetically to refer to the island, but has fallen out of common use in English. The name for Scotland in most of the Celtic languages is related to Albion: Alba in Scottish Gaelic, Albain (genitive Alban) in Irish, Nalbin in Manx and Alban in Welsh and Cornish. These names were later Latinised as Albania and Anglicised as Albany, which were once alternative names for Scotland."
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Albion

Nor are Ranger or Cedar "made up". Maybe not commonly used as names, but then neither was "River" until recently. They also talk about "Brayden" as being made up, but I've heard of that as a last name for decades. (Maybe not that spelling, but there is a Braden St. in my hometown.) The girls' names seem more made up.
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Old 02-24-2020, 09:57 AM
 
7,593 posts, read 13,837,513 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LO28SWM View Post
https://www.parents.com/baby-names/i...?utm=newsbreak


I MUCH prefer interesting made up names over the infinite and quite frankly sometimes stupid spellings of common names.
I don't see the mish-mash names as being that different from the stupid spellings. The parents are looking to give "unique" names.

Quote:
Originally Posted by LO28SWM View Post
But too be fair, is there a name in existence that isnt "made up"?
If you think language as being made up, then yes, names are up. Just about about all the names have some roots in words, which gives the name it's meaning. Some of the names on the list... They're not "made up" though, I guess they're very unusual for Brits. Some already been pointed out. But... Like Idalia... I know that's a Greek name and there are variations of that name so I don't know if it's so that far out. I can remember vaguely a MTV VJ in the earlyish 90s with a name like that.
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Old 02-24-2020, 10:19 AM
 
9,514 posts, read 3,571,629 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LO28SWM View Post
https://www.parents.com/baby-names/i...?utm=newsbreak




I MUCH prefer interesting made up names over the infinite and quite frankly sometimes stupid spellings of common names.

But too be fair, is there a name in existence that isnt "made up"?


The list made up boys names includes Brigham and Charleston though which...Brigham Young University and CHarleston South Carolina might disagree that its made up.

Have you heard any interesting names? A girl at my sons school is named D'Ashley which i dont care for much.

Most of the names on that list don't bother me at all. Frankly, I kind of liked a lot of them.


I also take issue with the author's use of the term "made up". Kyler is a made up name? I don't think so. And Cedar? It's not a made up word...although unusual for a name. (But I like it.)


A lot of the girl names, I liked the way they sounded. And really...isn't it ALWAYS about personal preference? I'd NEVER name a baby Mabel. But that's me.
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Old 02-24-2020, 10:38 AM
Status: "The ministers cat is an exhausted cat" (set 23 days ago)
 
Location: NJ
1,057 posts, read 363,411 times
Reputation: 3602
i dont think most of them are made up words just different uses of existing words. But some of the name mashups are very pretty and some are less pleasing.

And yes Language is made up but that isnt what I meant, lets use European for example since those are names I know. Some are very popular through out history, Elizabeth, Mary, Henry, David, George etc etc Some have gone out of fashion Jaquetta, Gertrude, and the aforementioned Brigham. But someone at some time made those names up or changed object words into name words such as Birch, Rose, Chastity and Prudence. All language changes over time, but names like Makenleigh, Xzavier, Alexzandre, Emmalee just seem silly and add a layer of difficulty to pronunciation and are often longer than they need to be which as a person with a 9 letter name myself, its annoying when filling out papers
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Old 02-24-2020, 11:13 AM
 
Location: Grosse Ile Michigan
27,972 posts, read 66,327,317 times
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ABCDE

Pronounced like Obesity.

*******

pronounced ASh hoe lay.

Then of course you have random objects Moon Unit, Toaster, Jack

Star wars movie names seem to pop up with some frequency.
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Old 02-24-2020, 11:16 AM
 
8,626 posts, read 5,237,281 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coldjensens View Post
ABCDE

Pronounced like Obesity.
I've heard this name. Pronounced "AB-si-dee," which while still a silly name, is not as bad as Obesity.
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Old 02-24-2020, 12:04 PM
 
12,178 posts, read 9,623,965 times
Reputation: 31355
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
Not a great article. They include "Albion" in the "made-up names", yet I'd heard it before. I looked it up and found this:
"Albion is an alternative name for the island of Great Britain. It is sometimes used poetically to refer to the island, but has fallen out of common use in English. The name for Scotland in most of the Celtic languages is related to Albion: Alba in Scottish Gaelic, Albain (genitive Alban) in Irish, Nalbin in Manx and Alban in Welsh and Cornish. These names were later Latinised as Albania and Anglicised as Albany, which were once alternative names for Scotland."
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Albion

Nor are Ranger or Cedar "made up". Maybe not commonly used as names, but then neither was "River" until recently. They also talk about "Brayden" as being made up, but I've heard of that as a last name for decades. (Maybe not that spelling, but there is a Braden St. in my hometown.) The girls' names seem more made up.
They didn't say made up words per se. It's made named for humans. Mumbai is a real word but it's generally not a name for people.
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Old 02-24-2020, 12:45 PM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
16,088 posts, read 18,981,172 times
Reputation: 32936
I don't think the author of the article knows what 'made up' means. Just because a word has not been in common use as a name before does not make them made up, it just makes them novel as first names.

And it has been a common trend throughout history to import 'non-name' words to be used as first name. Consider the Victorian/Edwardian trends of flower names (Daisy, Rose, Myrtle, etc.) and virtue names (Prudence, Charity, Grace, etc.) for girls, and the maiden-names (Ashley, Courtney, Stacey, etc. for boys, for example.

More recently, in the 1960s-1990s, we had a trendy period of occupational names (Taylor, Fletcher, Hunter, etc.) for boys, most of which were only common as surnames previously, and which then became unisex in the '00s, much like the maiden-names trend for boys a century earlier cited above.

In other words, this article's whole premise is faulty.
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Old 02-24-2020, 01:03 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
89,906 posts, read 106,897,840 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by charlygal View Post
They didn't say made up words per se. It's made named for humans. Mumbai is a real word but it's generally not a name for people.
The intro sentence: "A new wave of parents are making up their own baby names with the hope of making their kid unique."

Then, "Rather than opting for creative spellings, like all the Xzaviars and Jaydyns out there, it seems this new wave of parents is crafting their own new names—like Sylvalie and Albion— to avoid the dreaded Aidan R. and Emma B. issue. Some new picks also mash together the favorite names of each parent, or the names of beloved family members into a new unique name—like Evabeth and Jessalie for girls, and Jaspin and Wrenlow for boys."

This bold is nothing new, either. I went to school with a kid named "JoMar". She was named for both parents. I don't remember the parents' names, probably something like John and Mary.

The top 10 made up names for girls (which sounds kind of oxy-moronish, no?) are mostly new names, however, Idalia is a "real" name, from the Italian language.
https://nameberry.com/babyname/Idalia
There is also a genus of moths called "Idalia" and several towns in the US named Idalia.

"Jessalie" is hardly terribly creative.
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