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Old 02-25-2020, 10:22 PM
 
Location: Saint John, IN
11,575 posts, read 4,654,761 times
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To respond to a few other comments, my 14 yr old does babysit, but it's rare since she is busy with cheer, tumbling and school work. I usually let her keep the money she earns to use when she hangs out with her friends. Both of my girls are A/B students and my oldest is also part of NJHS. Grades will always come first! Also, one is in band and the other is in choir and both do various charitable work. They are quite busy!

I don't see either one making cheerleading a career, but it's possible they could have a job as a trainer or coach while in college. They also fundraise. We are given a different fundraiser every month that we can do if we wish, but we don't always do them. I personally can't stand fundraisers and would rather not bother people.

I suppose I'd rather have them busy with cheer then doing nothing and sitting on the coach on their phones or finding trouble!
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Old 02-25-2020, 10:27 PM
 
Location: Saint John, IN
11,575 posts, read 4,654,761 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Teacher Terry View Post
My friends 2 daughters ended up disabled from soccer and competitive cheer by 18. The flyer was dropped multiple times and the soccer player ruined her ankle. Definitely not worth it.
My older daughter broke her finger 2 years ago tumbling and then broke the same finger again last year. The second time she had to have surgery to have rods put in. She was out 3 months the first time and almost 5 months the second time. Both of my girls are fliers. I worry more about them getting hurt tumbling then being dropped. They are drilled over and over that they catch the flier no matter what. Doesn't mean accidents can't happen, but the program they are in teaches safety very well. My girls are not afraid at all and trust their bases.
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Old 02-26-2020, 12:44 AM
 
Location: interior Alaska
4,967 posts, read 3,707,931 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LilLisa83 View Post
There is such a thing as a professional cheerleader you know.... Maybe these girls could end up cheering for a professional football team?! You never know...

Op- if you can afford it, let them continue!
Quote:
Generally speaking, it is unusual for professional cheerleaders to earn more than a few thousand dollars per season, and a typical NFL cheerleader probably averages around $10 or less per hour over the course of a season.
https://money.com/nfl-cheerleaders-career-pay-salary/

Also, the kind of cheer done on the sidelines of pro sports really isn't the same thing as competitive cheer.
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Old 02-26-2020, 08:20 AM
 
Location: Brew City
4,867 posts, read 3,013,827 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Teacher Terry View Post
My friends 2 daughters ended up disabled from soccer and competitive cheer by 18. The flyer was dropped multiple times and the soccer player ruined her ankle. Definitely not worth it.
My daughter broke her jaw in two places just playing around in the living room. Things happen. She's yet to get hurt playing sports though.

What is different for my TINY eight year old is that she's confident when she's playing hockey. At school or anywhere else in public she's extremely shy and hardly speaks. She's doesn't believe in herself. When she steps on the ice it's like she has an alter-ego. She can skate circles around the boys. She shoots harder than most of the boys. She can lift the puck when a lot of the kids can't yet. She's good. And she's happy. That is why we spend around $12,000 a year for her and her sister to play. And I love to see her so happy and confident so I'm willing to spend 6-7 days a week at the ice rink and drive all over the Upper Midwest to watch my kids play. To us, it's well worth it.
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Old 02-26-2020, 08:33 AM
 
5,062 posts, read 3,369,777 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CGab View Post

I don't see either one making cheerleading a career, but it's possible they could have a job as a trainer or coach while in college. They also fundraise. We are given a different fundraiser every month that we can do if we wish, but we don't always do them. I personally can't stand fundraisers and would rather not bother people.
I'm with you on the fundraisers. I didn't mind them when the girls were raising funds for their high school cheer squad, but oh my, raising funds to pay for some private gym/cheer classes? No way.
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Old 02-26-2020, 08:45 AM
 
1,728 posts, read 1,042,697 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CGab View Post
I don't see either one making cheerleading a career, but it's possible they could have a job as a trainer or coach while in college. They also fundraise. We are given a different fundraiser every month that we can do if we wish, but we don't always do them. I personally can't stand fundraisers and would rather not bother people.

I suppose I'd rather have them busy with cheer then doing nothing and sitting on the coach on their phones or finding trouble!
This is a great attitude. They don't have to become Dallas Cowboy Cheerleaders to make use of their skills. Even the fitness and interpersonal connections with others on their cheer squad aspect is a benefit.

If they love cheer, I think it's important to research and talk together with them about how they can take the parts of cheering they love with them through the rest of their lives even if they don't make it into the top echelon.

My nephew (the swimmer who is going nowhere) is happy he did swimming, I think, and he can always teach swimming (but that's not really the same thing). I encouraged him to be a rescue swimmer or freelance/professional life guard--because he is QUITE fast, even if he's not the top of his college team. However, I don't think he ever sat down and considered what he would do with all the time and effort invested into swimming, so he didn't explore what options there are and how to get into fields like swiftwater rescue or the coast guard. But he's still young. Those options will be open to him for many years.
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Old 02-26-2020, 09:57 AM
 
Location: Nebraska
1,238 posts, read 1,079,139 times
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As far as time commitment, I would never leave or take time off work to cart my kids places. I'm retired and my kids are grown. Not many jobs are going to be accomodating.

It does seem like the children who would benefit the most from sports, the poor kids or the kids with uninvolved parents, kinda of get shut out.
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Old 02-26-2020, 10:29 AM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, NC, formerly DC and Phila
8,817 posts, read 13,274,798 times
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OP, how much have you saved for your girls' college? You don't have to answer that on here, but if you have already saved for their college, and this is above and beyond that and your daughter really wants to do it, then go ahead. If this is money that could be used for college because you haven't saved any/enough, then put the money towards college savings. Having spent the past year on an online board for college-bound seniors, I am amazed at how many people are gobsmacked at the price of college when their kids is as junior or senior in high school. They have no idea how they are going to pay, and most wish they had started saving earlier. If this isn't an issue for you, then ignore. But if you haven't looked at the cost of college these days, then take a look and start saving that cheer money for that.
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Old 02-26-2020, 11:29 AM
 
2,514 posts, read 911,666 times
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My 3 boys are long grown and they played sports except for football. However, it was all local for fun. Nothing that consumed all our time. They also were excellent bowlers and we did take them to some out of town tournaments. Kids need balance so I wouldn’t be spending all that time and money on something that will be a memory in a few years.
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Old 02-26-2020, 12:27 PM
 
Location: Winterpeg
1,074 posts, read 443,677 times
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I think the answer to this varies depending on the family. If mom and dad are resentful of the time and money, or the money stretches the budget too far, then sometimes a kid has to hear "no". But if the family enjoys it and can afford it, then it's a decision for them.

My kid decided to play a bunch of sports and be pretty good, rather than specialize and be really good. She's a natural athlete, and she had opportunities to go far in one sport, but wasn't interested. Her dad and I supported that. She ended up coaching martial arts as a job through high school, which was a great way to combine her interests (money and sports!).

We were really busy in the years from the time she was 7 until she could drive herself. Some years we almost didn't have a free weekend. And sometimes we had to make decisions based on finances. One year I even didn't play my sport to have more time and money for hers. Some of the tournaments were butt-numbingly boring, and the season I was the only parent driver for the high school basketball team besides the coach, I played a lot of Angry Birds while sitting in the opposing high school's stands by myself (high school sports are not a big deal in Canada like they are in the US) But after she graduated high school I missed it sometimes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vegabern View Post
I play in two women's leagues with a range of women from complete newbie skaters and grandmas to college players in their early 20's.
Hello to a fellow hockey player! I also play in a couple of women's leagues, with the same variety of skill levels. Some pickup with men, too. I'm a goalie, so that keeps it interesting.
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