U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Parenting
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 04-04-2020, 12:04 PM
 
Location: Saint John, IN
11,572 posts, read 4,639,825 times
Reputation: 14632

Advertisements

ABSOLUTELY NOT!!! Not in my house!

My teens know not to swear, period! As a matter of fact, just the other day my younger daughter called someone on TV an idiot and my teen told her not to swear. Thought it was funny that she thought the word "idiot" was a swear word, but I have always taught them that,
1. Ladies shouldn't swear and 2. the word "idiot" is just not nice to say.

If you raise your kids not to swear, most likely they won't. Of course, Some still will however.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-04-2020, 12:10 PM
 
237 posts, read 51,747 times
Reputation: 561
Dignified and honorable behavior and conduct, as opposed to dignified and honorable language alone, would not allow people to be racist, classist, rude and mean

Mutually exclusive.

For people who want to cuss, cuss away.

I personally don't wear pearls but we all make an impression on others by our conduct and the language we use.

Last edited by RubyandPearl; 04-04-2020 at 01:32 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-05-2020, 04:25 PM
 
931 posts, read 765,714 times
Reputation: 2153
No, I don't allow my teens to curse at home. I don't like substitutes either, like "frick".

I'm not naive enough to think they never do, but they keep it to their friend-groups.

I am 51 and I have only just recently started cursing a little bit around my own mother, who raised us in a similar fashion. No f-bombs, but pretty much anything else is fair game.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-05-2020, 04:32 PM
 
Location: Tyler, TX, born + raised SF Bay
2,840 posts, read 1,223,332 times
Reputation: 2612
Quote:
Originally Posted by jcp123 View Post
My kids are too young right now. And while it’s an interesting question my wife and I haven’t really talked about yet, she and I are both potty mouths, and probably by the time they hit high school, we’ll probably just be “whatever” about it. We have a pretty liberal parenting style, anyway.
Here’s the other part I should have included. As far as that liberal mindset goes, neither of us are really bothered by some set of lines we draw on paper or noises we generate by moving our mouths in a certain way which we somehow arbitrarily agree are supposed to be bad. In the grand scheme of things, it’s actually fairly petty. But, yes, I prefer to wait until they get older to allow use so that they can understand proper language and expression before relying on “bad words” to make emphasis.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-05-2020, 05:32 PM
 
7,799 posts, read 3,758,747 times
Reputation: 20485
Most that my sons got away with was the 'dern' in it's foul form .
If any of the friends showed up using foul language it was addressed immediately with a guidance to the door.

I don't care for expletives. Found fun others words or phrases that tone it down.

I'm a civil member of the pearl clutching club.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-01-2020, 09:04 AM
 
132 posts, read 158,954 times
Reputation: 244
I don't care about swearing at all. I do not understand how it's disrespectful or rude. It's one thing to talk to your kids about being mean to other people, but you can be hurtful with or without swearing.

I swear, my husband swears, our parents swear, my kids swear. It's not trashy. It doesn't make you sound less intelligent. Many brilliant people swear when they're angry or for emphasis.

I think it's a ridiculous thing to be uptight about.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-01-2020, 09:56 AM
 
9,470 posts, read 3,553,795 times
Reputation: 21794
Quote:
Originally Posted by RomulusXXV View Post
I can't control the language of others but I can control my language. And, unlike many of you, it would seem, I CAN typically string a sentence together pretty much ALL OF THE TIME without the need to spice it up with ugly language. But then, I've always avoided the 'monkey see-monkey do' tactics of 'the tribe' in order to fit in with society. Am I special?

LOL, you seem to think so.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-09-2020, 09:09 PM
 
Location: Jacksonville, FL
7,644 posts, read 8,280,264 times
Reputation: 6233
I allow my teenage daughters to curse around me, but I don’t encourage it and I will reign them in when they get out of hand. They are not allowed to curse around any other adults, most especially their mother, and they are not allowed to use curse words to directly insult each other or anyone else. I was raised understanding the difference between “shop talk” and “polite conversation,” and I’ve raised them the same. An occasional swear when something breaks is no big deal around our house. If they were to swear in front of either of their grandmothers, I have little doubt that they would receive a fast and probably painful reminder of their manners without my intervention. I’ve given them the warning of such an outcome, it’s up to them if they want to heed it. I don’t even swear in front of my mother, and it’s been a long time since I lived under her roof.

Then again, I have a rather different perspective than most people I know. For all intents and purposes, I was on my own at ~15 due to circumstances beyond anyone’s control. It’s affected my parenting style a bit, because I expect them to make good decisions without me having to tell them every time. Bed time is rather flexible, but they are expected to be out of the common areas of the house and in their rooms by 9:30 PM. Tired the next day? That’s their problem, they should go to bed earlier. They’re still expected to get their schoolwork and chores done, and if I get a call or email from a teacher this house will make a max security prison look comfortable for the next week. They understand that all electronics in this house belong to me and availability is subject to my whim. Get schoolwork and their chores done, keep themselves and their rooms clean, and they have free access to computer, tablet, and phone. If they start getting out of control, they have no access. It seems to work well; they balance their electronics time pretty well, and they both get decent grades, even with the current school shutdowns - though I’ll admit it was rocky for the first few days. I’m not going to be around to make all their decisions forever, so they need to learn logical skills while I’m still here to remind them when necessary. For the same reason, they both know that I will let them argue with me for hours as long as they remain logical. Once they start using emotion to prove their point, the argument is done. I’m honestly quite proud of them.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-10-2020, 05:34 AM
 
Location: Minnesota
2,436 posts, read 728,470 times
Reputation: 10335
Quote:
Originally Posted by ItalianIce View Post
I don't care about swearing at all. I do not understand how it's disrespectful or rude. It's one thing to talk to your kids about being mean to other people, but you can be hurtful with or without swearing.

I swear, my husband swears, our parents swear, my kids swear. It's not trashy. It doesn't make you sound less intelligent. Many brilliant people swear when they're angry or for emphasis.

I think it's a ridiculous thing to be uptight about.
Profanity is, of course, relative.

Before the 1960s, profanity when used in the United States had much more of an impact because there was a much greater social taboo to its use, in part because that taboo had the force of government behind it. Before it fell apart during that decade, the Motion Picture Production Code (more commonly known as the Hays Code) heavily regulated what could be said (and depicted) in any motion picture distributed in the United States. When Gone With The Wind came out in 1939, for example, the producers had to get a special exemption to allow Rhett Butler's line about not giving a damn. And until the obscenity cases of the late 1950s and 1960s struck down laws allowing it, books with naughty words in them like Tropic of Cancer and Lady Chatterly's Lover saw people criminally prosecuted for importing and selling them.

Somehow, 'hell' and 'damn' are profanity but infinitely more acceptable than the f-word. Isn't being damned and in hell a far worse thing than having sex, even casual and/or illicit sex? Strange standards.

And how about 'zounds'? That's just a goofy word characters in cartoons say, right? Shakespeare used 'zounds' many times in his plays. What almost no one realizes is that he was really pushing the envelope by using a very offensive term for the time, which originated as a shortened form of 'God's wounds', a reference to the injuries incurred by Jesus on the cross. The word 'gadzooks' (God's hooks - the nails which affixed him to the cross) was a reference to the same. And in Shakespeare's day they were literally profane and their use was taboo. The term 'bloody' in British English also refers to the blood shed on the cross. In 1913, when George Bernard Shaw's Pygmalion was released in London, newspapers were all a-twitter over the use of that word - 'bloody' - in the performance. But they refused to print the word, only referring to it indirectly as a shocking bit of dialogue. That was barely 100 years ago.

Yet who among us would care one iota of our child used 'Zounds!' as an exclamation, or complained about 'that bloody barking dog'?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-10-2020, 05:48 AM
 
4,950 posts, read 2,151,304 times
Reputation: 4926
I have asked my daughter not curse. Now, when she feels she really needs to say a curse word or wants me to hear a song with a curse word, she will ask first. That is usually when I allow it, if 'allow' is the proper word to be used here. Cooperate is a better word in this context.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Parenting
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:04 AM.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top