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Old 02-10-2021, 11:49 AM
 
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I would, for special occasions. Like...Thanksgiving dinner, or a New Year's toast. And only MY children. It would NOT apply to friends of my children.
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Old 02-10-2021, 11:51 AM
 
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I could see letting them have a sip. My grandmother would like me try a sip of wine.

I recall going to Ireland when i was 14 and my older cousin who was in her late 30's offered me a vodka and orange juice. I said no. Some people just have a different outlook on alcohol i guess.
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Old 02-10-2021, 11:51 AM
 
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There's a relative on my husband's side of the family, that threw a high school graduation party for his son, and some of the son's friends. The son was going to go into the army soon after. The relative served alcohol at the graduation party.


I thought it was a really stupid and bone headed thing to do. The police thought so too.
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Old 02-10-2021, 11:55 AM
 
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When i was in high school there was a party where alcohol was served and one of the kids who had just graduated got in his car drunk, started to drive home, hit a tree and died.
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Old 02-10-2021, 12:08 PM
 
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Originally Posted by msRB311 View Post
When i was in high school there was a party where alcohol was served and one of the kids who had just graduated got in his car drunk, started to drive home, hit a tree and died.

Were the parents held liable?


Lord knows, I would HATE HATE HATE to be the party throwing, alcohol serving parent if that happened to one of my kids friends, at that age. If it was MY kid who died in an accident like that, I would probably hate the parent who served the alcohol in that situation. I'd be thinking "How DARE they serve my underage high school student liquor?"


But...on the other hand, I'd probably have a talk with my underage kid before he goes to the party, about drinking and driving, and just CALL me if he's too drunk to drive.
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Old 02-10-2021, 12:30 PM
 
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My kids know the law and have asked if they could have alcohol. New Year's eve, they got a glass of wine. We don't normally drink, but keep alcohol around. I've told them about the alcoholics in the family and have suggested they watch it. My oldest is in college and about to turn 21. I can't stop him from drinking. He and his friends cook with wine. My daughter loves Pinterest. She finds recipes and asks to cook and bake with wine. I allow it sometimes. No one in our family really drinks.
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Old 02-10-2021, 12:42 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Sundaydrive00 View Post
I don't think any news source cares about a parent giving their adult children alcohol in the privacy of their own home. I've never even seen a news story about younger kids being given alcohol by their parents. As long as you are not giving your children excessive amounts of alcohol, throwing leggers for their friends, or letting them drive drunk, no one will care what you do.
Exactly. There is a difference in letting your 17, 18, 19, 20 year old have a beer or glass of wine and throwing a drunk fest for a bunch of 15 year olds.
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Old 02-10-2021, 01:20 PM
 
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Default re

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Originally Posted by Sassybluesy View Post
Were the parents held liable?


Lord knows, I would HATE HATE HATE to be the party throwing, alcohol serving parent if that happened to one of my kids friends, at that age. If it was MY kid who died in an accident like that, I would probably hate the parent who served the alcohol in that situation. I'd be thinking "How DARE they serve my underage high school student liquor?"


But...on the other hand, I'd probably have a talk with my underage kid before he goes to the party, about drinking and driving, and just CALL me if he's too drunk to drive.
I believe so and a new law was implemented within the state because of this - the Social Host Responsibility law.

Alcohol can be a very scary thing. Even reasoning with someone to call for a ride can be pointless...people often think they're fine or get so drunk they dont even know what they're doing
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Old 02-10-2021, 02:53 PM
 
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Originally Posted by 2mares View Post
Yes. If they are drinking anyway might as well do it safety. The more you forbid and make something taboo, the more they want to do it.
My in-laws are, by and large, heavy drinkers and subscribe to this theory. But they're being disingenuous about it and only do it out of laziness and lack of their own self-control with alcohol. All of their kids, now young adults, have use issues.

Anecdotal, I know, but I do believe many parents just want to believe things that require less work from them. Also, kids will tend to mimic their parents' behaviors, so if the parents' social life is booze-centric...guess what the kids will mimic?

Last edited by KemBro71; 02-10-2021 at 03:01 PM..
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Old 02-10-2021, 04:15 PM
 
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[quote=KemBro71;60372692]My in-laws are, by and large, heavy drinkers and subscribe to this theory. But they're being disingenuous about it and only do it out of laziness and lack of their own self-control with alcohol. All of their kids, now young adults, have use issues.

Anecdotal, I know, but I do believe many parents just want to believe things that require less work from them. Also, kids will tend to mimic their parents' behaviors, so if the parents' social life is booze-centric...guess what the kids will mimic?[/quote]
I've always had this in mind, with my kids. "If mom and/or dad does it, then it's OK."


My kids saw me drink alcohol maybe once, before they were of age.


For many years, I was a single mom, and since, and even if the opportunity arose, I didn't drink around them. My kids were my responsibility, and I felt like, especially as a single parent, I needed to set an example.
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