U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Parenting
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Closed Thread Start New Thread
 
Old 05-06-2021, 12:39 PM
 
10,687 posts, read 6,676,223 times
Reputation: 28289

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sand&Salt View Post
I have lots of relatives overseas and in the past, they made a point to return to the U.S. for the birth so the child could be an American citizen. I'm not so sure they are all doing that anymore, but it used to be important to them. My nephew returned to England with his British wife, for the birth so it would be totally free under England's HC system.
If at least one parent is an American citizen, the child doesn't need to be born in the US. He or she will get citizenship through the parent.

My niece and nephew were born in Germany, but since their father is American, they both have American passports. And European ones, too.
Rate this post positively

 
Old 05-06-2021, 01:04 PM
 
27,660 posts, read 24,719,266 times
Reputation: 25521
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sand&Salt View Post
Never thought I'd post in parenting, lol. Came up on the sidebar.

I have lots of relatives overseas and in the past, they made a point to return to the U.S. for the birth so the child could be an American citizen. I'm not so sure they are all doing that anymore, but it used to be important to them. My nephew returned to England with his British wife, for the birth so it would be totally free under England's HC system.

IMO, the healthcare is the biggest deterrent. Even under an affordable Obamacare plan, there are huge deductibles and co-pays. Enough to bankrupt a person if the medical event is big enough. I don't need to comment on any of the other issues except gun culture in the U.S. is a real deterrent.

My niece in Indonesia is pregnant and I wonder what they will decide. They came back for the previous birth.

Congratulations, in any case!
So the US is such an awful place yet so many want their children to be born here to be an American citizen?
Rate this post positively
 
Old 05-06-2021, 02:04 PM
 
Location: Dallas
6,060 posts, read 5,704,708 times
Reputation: 18336
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2mares View Post
So the US is such an awful place yet so many want their children to be born here to be an American citizen?
I guess for some people the US isn't good enough for them to live in, but for some reason they value American citizenship.
Rate this post positively
 
Old 05-06-2021, 02:07 PM
 
3,012 posts, read 1,040,310 times
Reputation: 7863
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ceece View Post
I don't understand this post at all. Live where you want, for whatever reasons you want. You seem to be fretting about things that are entirely under your control.
I agree. And it's an extreme level of anxiety, extremely extreme, at not even the first trimester mark.
Rate this post positively
 
Old 05-06-2021, 02:43 PM
 
Location: NYC
252 posts, read 213,182 times
Reputation: 196
First of all, congratulations. Your situation is somewhat similar to mine (high-risk pregnancy, biracial kids, etc.) except we have twins and live in NYC.

Don’t worry about all that gender/social media/racism stuff. Getting your wife safely through her high-risk pregnancy is the most important thing. If you have a good healthcare plan, good hospital, etc. it would be wise not to mess with it. My wife was 2 weeks early and had huge complications but everyone came through fine physically and financially.

Will your wife be the primary caregiver? The saying ‘happy wife, happy life’ is certainly corny but if your wife is lonely, unhappy, out of her element, it could be rough going for everybody. Friends come and go but if there are good family relationships, that’s golden. Then again, they may not react the way you expect.

My girls were born in 2003 so we went from flip phones to blackberries to iPhones and social media by the time they got their first phones when they turned 12. It was a promise I made years before so woe to me if I went back on it. We had epic battles over apps and people they were online with but thankfully that time has passed. Who knows what things will be like 10-12 years from now.
Rate this post positively
 
Old 05-06-2021, 03:22 PM
 
17,451 posts, read 2,853,939 times
Reputation: 29227
Quote:
Originally Posted by saibot View Post
If at least one parent is an American citizen, the child doesn't need to be born in the US. He or she will get citizenship through the parent.

My niece and nephew were born in Germany, but since their father is American, they both have American passports. And European ones, too.

Not necessarily.
Rate this post positively
 
Old 05-06-2021, 04:18 PM
 
10,687 posts, read 6,676,223 times
Reputation: 28289
Quote:
Originally Posted by Threestep2 View Post
Not necessarily.
There are some exceptions, but they're rare. What "not necessarily" are you thinking about? It sounds to me like in the OP's case, the child will be born to at least one American parent who has lived in the US for at least five years and will be living with that parent.
Rate this post positively
 
Old 05-06-2021, 05:50 PM
 
Location: Coastal Georgia
41,876 posts, read 51,974,378 times
Reputation: 72834
I definitely think you should stay in Malaysia. You sound like a bundle of nutty, and we don’t need any more of that.

Congratulations on the pregnancy. I’m sure it will be fine.
Rate this post positively
 
Old 05-06-2021, 06:13 PM
 
129 posts, read 46,420 times
Reputation: 198
Since some of you brought it up...

Yes, our child will be a dual citizen of the US and Malaysia after it is born (sorry I keep using "it" but we don't know its sex yet).

However, Malaysia only recognizes dual citizenships until they turn 18. Then they'll have to choose (although most dual citizens I know hide their other citizenship.)
Rate this post positively
 
Old 05-06-2021, 08:25 PM
 
2,329 posts, read 1,444,827 times
Reputation: 8213
Quote:
Originally Posted by aquietpath View Post
I guess for some people the US isn't good enough for them to live in, but for some reason they value American citizenship.
US passports allow for free travel to more countries than, say, Malaysian passports.

Also, it's more that the US isn't a safe place to raise young children comparitively. Once they're adults, they can choose to go to college or do business there. The us is great for both those things.
Rate this post positively
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Closed Thread


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Parenting
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2021, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top