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Old 10-02-2008, 07:22 PM
 
Location: Cedar City, Utah
4,347 posts, read 8,650,048 times
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I haven't either and 5 of my kids went through school, college and have good careers so I guess they didn't need it
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Old 10-02-2008, 08:20 PM
 
193 posts, read 787,293 times
Reputation: 204
LOL---people are crazy. Just let your kid pick HIS own career. Your probably going to waste all this money sending him to this school, and he is going to turn around and decide at 19 he wants to be a police man, while his friend in public school grows up to be the brain surgeon.
You never know what kids will choose. It is stupid to steal your kids childhood and shove his head in a book all his life in hopes that he MIGHT be a doctor or lawyer or whatever it is you want him to be. Some people cant help but live vicariously through their kids apparently.
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Old 10-02-2008, 08:28 PM
 
13,180 posts, read 13,731,706 times
Reputation: 4537
Quote:
Originally Posted by 121804 View Post
I can see where you are coming from.
Question: What do you plan to do in order for your child to have the skill set to be competitive in the international community?

I don't mean this as a sarcastic comment. I am curious to know if you have an alternative idea or method.

You have a point. And a good point.

But, since you don't literally have to send them to Kumon, what are the other choices? Your child can still be successful & competitive with other methods!
About the only think of besides mastering reading, writing, and math is having them learn a foreign language and exposing them to International travel. We both work odd hours so time is an issue. After sports, school funtions, and their homework, we're maxed out. I don't have time to take on a math program when I'm not that great at it myself. (C in College Calculus)
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Old 10-02-2008, 08:39 PM
 
697 posts, read 1,878,275 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chickrae View Post
Like the Evelyn Wood reading dynamics program? Is it in schools or you buy the books and do it at home. Sorry this is foreign to me
I don't know what Evelyn Wood is, but Kumon is a reading and math program that focuses on repetition. My daughter did the math part for a short time, but the guy who runs the place here did a lot of talking while she was doing her work because we always went at a slow time.

The kids take small papers home and the parent times them to see how long it takes to do so many pages. It's all repetitive; problem after problem. It's supposed to take only a few minutes a day and they move fairly quickly.

The trouble with that is, they move so quickly that if they don't keep doing it, they forget. The guy who did the program here said the boy who was a national Kumon champ got into high school, stopped the program for a while and forgot almost all he had supposedly learned in the program. He had to start way back (not all the way, but a considerable distance from where he ended). He said that happens to most of the kids if they stop the program.

Bottom line, it doesn't really teach the kids anything, they learn to do math fast, but don't retain what they are doing mainly because of the speed in which they move on.

It's page after page of problems of the same thing; add, then subtract, then multiply, then divide, and so on. They supposedly master one then move on to the next.

A parent can do a better job at home making up their own problems and have the kids do lots of those problems, not timing, but repeating until the answers come without thinking. Taking it a little slower could be a very good thing, but going that fast does them no good.
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Old 10-02-2008, 08:41 PM
 
13,180 posts, read 13,731,706 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beanandpumpkin View Post
I have a question. I am going to try to tread lightly here.

If you do not think that the school is going to prepare your child properly for the rest of his/her life, then why are you sending him/her there? Is there anything you could do to make your child's educational experience better/more enriching than sending him to school for 7 hours and then to Kumon afterwards, then home to do homework? If you dislike doing that, but feel obligated to do so because the school is not doing its job, then.... what? Is there an alternative?
Literally, the elementary school they go to has the highest test scores in the State. I'm not kidding. Higher than even Highland Park ISD elementary schools. I'm sure they are doing a fine job. But that's not good enough nowadays. You must be in the top 10% of your High School Class to be accepted to the University of Texas. They start separating these kids out in 3rd grade for higher level math courses.

So I can't think of anything other to do but drop out of the rat race and cross my fingers they have a safe and secure career ahead of them as the other parents continue to push and drive their kids educational instruction.

Last edited by padcrasher; 10-02-2008 at 09:21 PM..
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Old 10-02-2008, 08:42 PM
 
48,508 posts, read 88,602,322 times
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That is just the way it is in a competive world. They do these things just like those wanting to get in professional sports do theirs. But then sports only really works for like 1%.
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Old 10-02-2008, 09:53 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
1,820 posts, read 4,162,304 times
Reputation: 1911
Quote:
Originally Posted by 925mine View Post
Acutally, Kumon is a learning method for reading and math. It moves very quickly and is extremely repetitive, which is how it's supposed to work. If you know what the method is, you can do it yourself at home it won't cost you an arm and a leg.

Touble with it is; if the child should stop going, they also stop remembering what they have 'learned'. There's not much retention.

Thank you! funny... my girls are adopted from China and my husband (who is not Asian) is an Engineer... I see my oldest being very interested in what daddy does for work and wanting to work diligently on math....

Sounds like it would be something that could be done at home, as long as we as the parents are repetitive about it with them.

Thanks again for the info!
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Old 10-02-2008, 10:00 PM
 
Location: Grosse Ile Michigan
28,921 posts, read 68,889,584 times
Reputation: 35330
Give me a happy ditch digger child over a stressed out doctor any day. Besides only the ditch digger is going to have the time to come change my diapers when I get old.
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Old 10-02-2008, 11:00 PM
 
6,584 posts, read 23,664,041 times
Reputation: 3220
padcrasher - I just think it is that area you live in. What did they have? About 127 National Merit Semi-finalists from 3 senior high schools? Isn't that the district you are in? The hyper-competitiveness and cut throat academic overachieving is why some folks move over a district (any direction) or send their kids to Catholic school. The average kids just fall through the cracks there.

ETA - the for-profit tutoring places here are used to get ahead and score higher on tests like the SAT the gifted kids take in middle school, and not as much for remediation.
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Old 10-03-2008, 08:35 AM
 
4,253 posts, read 8,585,021 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coldjensens View Post
Give me a happy ditch digger child over a stressed out doctor any day. Besides only the ditch digger is going to have the time to come change my diapers when I get old.
Actually, I personally think there are too many college-educated young people nowadays, who are under-employed. Except for those having medical degrees.

And so many vacancies in the blue-collar jobs. Carpenters, welders, automotive technicians, oil rig workers now can demand $30-40-50+ hourly wage. And the nurses shortage!! All these vacancies are very extremely painful in the area where I live.

Though I come from a college driven world, I guess I've changed. I wouldn't mind if my kids go to a community college. My almost 4-year old son was practicaly born with cars in his hands. All 4 years of his life he's towing 12 hours a day - this is much more severe than in an average boy. If he becomes an automotive technican, that would be OK with me. Though probably I would encourage him to get a degree in mechanical engineering. But I wouldn't bend him if I see he's not the academic type.
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