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Old 09-12-2006, 09:03 PM
 
98 posts, read 415,273 times
Reputation: 64

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Scranton:

Your a young man but you have learned a great deal in your short life. Many guys your age do not have a clue nor do they care.

You will make a wonderful Professional , I can see that now.
You need to get the right fit in another company though. Not sure if you have College but that is a necessary these days so I would suggest you go that route.

You have a bright future and I can't see someone so intelligent and well versed work at Lowes.

You put me to shame with your writing and I am 47 .

By the way I love reading what you have to say. But I am seeing many younger people posting more here and you all are an amazing bunch.

One thing to note: Business is No longer Loyal to its work force- and yep it is the bottom line anymore. I learned a long ttime ago you have to look out for #1 -YOU..

Aim High and you will Be Someone who makes a difference..
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Old 09-13-2006, 06:01 PM
 
Location: Marshall-Shadeland, Pittsburgh, PA
32,200 posts, read 74,166,248 times
Reputation: 18394
Thanks very much Sleepless for the kind words! ;o) It's also refreshing to see a middle-aged person who actually has hope that the younger generation is capable of doing great things for society, unlike most here in NEPA who tend to categorize most in the 18-24 age range as being "lazy, spoiled hooligans." Believe me, I'm friends with people who volunteer to try to make our area the best it can be, and I know firsthand that the few bad apples among "Generation Y" are simply overshadowing the many positive accomplishments being made daily.

As far as Lowe's is concerned, I just don't see "eye-to-eye" with hypocritical management philosophies of "putting the customer first" while intentionally understaffing stores so much that your customers and employees both leave the store with a sour taste in their mouths for the company. If you honestly expect to "wow" a new customer, then you need to provide your workforce with the proper resources to make this target goal achieveable. Instead, we've been noticing vacating positions being eliminated, leaving those who remain to try to struggle and pick up the slack without an increase in pay. For this reason, I've become very miserable at my job---If you're going to pretty much triple the expected workload on your employees, then you should at least do something to try to minimize the impact on them, be it a pay increase, an extra day off per week, occasional store parties, etc. I'm noticing employee morale in my store dipping lower and lower and lower as business continues to increase and increase and increase annually. I've now been at the company for nearly two years, and I've noticed a severe downturn in job quality since I started my tenure here.

However, I must re-iterate that my concerns resonate amongst most, if not all major chains in the U.S. I'm sure employees and customers alike are often feeling ignored and neglected by other conglomerates, such as Wal-Mart, Home Depot, etc. Managers trying to deliberately understaff their stores in order to meet "target margins" in order to boost their own annual bonuses is a common phenomenon in retail, and this is the reason why the associates you come into contact with at these companies are often so unhelpful---Would you be happy making less than $9/hr and constantly being subjected to avoidable stress in the form of being understaffed and screamed at by underserved customers while your superiors are earning over $100,000 annually for creating such a mess? I, for one, had an epiphany today---I just walked into work for the first time in nearly two years and said to myself "I don't care anymore." When I expressed my concern to my co-workers about no longer feeling "passionate" about my job, I was met with a cacophony of "Wow! Welcome to the club!", as most of them have also already become disillusioned with corporate greed.

There once was a time when I thought it was special to work in customer service; I wanted to come into work everyday and make a difference in the lives of my customers. Now, I realize that this fantasy of mine clashes with the reality of inept management policy and a lust for the almighty dollar. This is why I hope to establish my own CPA practice someday; a firm where my clients would be guaranteed to come first before selfish desires of "skimming off the top." I can't wait until my co-workers do actually form a coup d'etat, as I'll be right behind them! Life is just starting to feel pretty pointless, as all you do is walk into a giant box for nine hours a day and watch your co-workers become overstressed and your customers leaving angered. Then again, you people, as Americans, asked for this type of environment when you demanded "one-stop shopping!" Now, you have your wish, and for that you have to be willing to sacrifice great customer service for those low, low prices and convenience. I've noticed far too many customers, especially senior citizens, treating our store as if it was still "Bob's Corner Store" on Main Street. It's sad to see them get an unfortunate reality check when they realize that the day of an employee knowing you on a first-name basis and being able to take you right to any product you'd care to browse for and tell you everything about it is over---There's no way this is possible when you have tens of thousands of products and thousands of daily customers vs. a few dozen employees.
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Old 09-13-2006, 06:15 PM
 
70 posts, read 114,678 times
Reputation: 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScrantonWilkesBarre View Post
I can't wait until my co-workers do actually form a coup d'etat, as I'll be right behind them!
Uh oh... my dad was right Seriously though, Scranton you're a credit to our age bracket. If there ever is a change in how things are run you'll be right there in the lead.
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Old 09-13-2006, 09:48 PM
 
98 posts, read 415,273 times
Reputation: 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScrantonWilkesBarre View Post
TThen again, you people, as Americans, asked for this type of environment when you demanded "one-stop shopping!" Now, you have your wish, and for that you have to be willing to sacrifice great customer service for those low, low prices and convenience. I've noticed far too many customers, especially senior citizens, treating our store as if it was still "Bob's Corner Store" on Main Street. It's sad to see them get an unfortunate reality check when they realize that the day of an employee knowing you on a first-name basis and being able to take you right to any product you'd care to browse for and tell you everything about it is over---There's no way this is possible when you have tens of thousands of products and thousands of daily customers vs. a few dozen employees.
I am not sure Americans asked for it but more likely Corporate America Marketed it as a way to svae a few bucks! America bought it and little by little the Ma and Pop stores had to close.

Do not be upset with the Older People- they only know the Old Way and still expect that. Heck even I do! But I also know that Business today does not hire Experience but those they can pay Lower wages to..

Heck I must say your lucky to be getting $9h. Many businesses here in Carbon County will only pay you Minimum Wage I assure you!

As a CPA you will indeed be working one on one with your customer. I took Accounting in College(I went in my 30's) so I know the basics. It is a facinating job and if you love numbers well that is the Job for you!
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Old 02-19-2007, 04:15 PM
 
Location: South-Central Penna. (Harrisburg)
222 posts, read 1,364,910 times
Reputation: 81
I have freinds in Tower City which is close to the SCHUY / LEBANON / DAUPHIN line. it is a pretty cheap area to buy a home, about 50 - 80 for a Huge 5 bed, 2 bath home. They are very very large and usually have small yards around them. I can tell you in Hegins, Tower City, Muir, Sacramento, Valley View and Pine Grove the the standard rent for a property like that is about 175 - 300, I havent even heard of anything higher than that. You can buy a home for very cheap and fix it up yourself if you like. Tower City has a Subway, a few mom & pops, 2 gas stations, a few diners nearby, and a pool hall. It is rebounding after years of decline. They strip mine a lot in Schuy. County and there are open mine shafts all over, and illegal spent coal ash dumps all over. As Scrant-WilkesBarre said you might gain a slight amount, hopefully not lose anything, but there is an over abundance of properties, and very few jobs. They have a huge industrial park south of Frackville. Also a federal prison and the schuykill valley mall in that town. It is half - deserted. There are lots of small petty cash subsistance jobs, but not much in the way of 'living like a king' the ydo ahve two state parks, tuscarora and locust lake. the have a few golf corses, and some state game lands around. It's very beautiful if you like mountains and being close to nature. As with a lot of places, its in the middle of the rust belt, there is an aging population, and a diminishing tax base. Tim Holden is the rep. for that area and there hasnt really been almost any economic development. you could even use the word 'contraction' to describe the economic activity there. I could live there and still be within 30 - 40 minutes of the city, but you better be prepared to travel for jobs, medical and entertainment. they have dozens of historical buildings and churches and stuff like that, its very great place to be from and to visit, but it's on the edge for employment.
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Old 03-07-2007, 02:55 PM
 
2 posts, read 6,451 times
Reputation: 10
I'm in the process of building a home in Swatara Creek (I-81 & Rt. 443 area). It's a sister community to Swatara Village. The folks seem very friendly and I like the small town atmosphere. Can anyone tell me about the two retirement villages?
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Old 04-13-2007, 07:53 AM
 
2 posts, read 6,451 times
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Talking Settling in Schuylkill

I retired in 2002 after 35 years in the telecommunication field. I drove a school bus for 3 years afterwards just to have something to do. After several years of searching and analyzing the "retirement havens" (FL, NC, SC, etc.), we decided to move an hour up the road to Schuy. Cty. (Pine Grove area). The main question is "why"?
We gave serious thought to the NC area, specifically Asheville area and its scenic mountains. The price was right, the taxes were right, but something was wrong, . . . growth! At this stage of our lives we really aren't giving much thought to making a killing on our real estate investment (it's just going to greedy offspring or nursing homes anyway). The thought of new schools, new admin buildings, banks, crowds, construction, it was too much to bear. So we looked for a quiet, sedate area with a negative growth rate. Here we are!
That may not be a textbook recommendation for the county, but at this point in our lives it fills the bill.
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Old 04-13-2007, 01:53 PM
 
14 posts, read 73,043 times
Reputation: 23
Default Schuylkill COunty - think twice before moving here!

I was born, raised and still live in Schuylkill COunty (30 yrs later) ...and I'm desperately trying to get out! Yes, some areas and towns are nice. Private, rural, pretty settings if you can afford it ...but a lot of the towns are downright depressed. The area, in it's hay-day of coal mining, was fruitful. Now, the area is economically depressed and run down.

It's a "different world' in Sch. County. The shopping is pathetic. There are a few small malls, but nothing to write home about. I usually travel 50-60 miles to Reading or Harrisburg to do some decent shopping. Same goes with restaurants - barely anything. Yes, there are fast food stuff but if you want to go to places like red lobster, tgi fridays or olive garden you'll have to drive 50 miles. Not really much to do except sit at a local dive bar and drink beer. (which is exactly what a lot of "skooks" do!) Jobs can be scarce depending on your profession. I commute to Harrisburg (60 miles) every day because I couldn't find a job in the area for my degree. (Maybe my first mistake was moving back home after college!)

I would definitely stay away from Mahanoy City and Shenandoah. The towns are dirty. My husband teaches at the Mahanoy area high school and the district has a rating of 60% low income families. That's way more than even a big city like Harrisburg! Shenandoah is slowly becoming an immigrant town of spanish decent. A lot of them don't speak english.

I guess it depends on your age, whether you have kids, and what kind of life you are lookihng for, but I for one can't wait to save up enough money so i'm able to move out! I could go on and on but I will spare everyone of my rants.
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Old 02-05-2008, 08:10 PM
 
1 posts, read 2,854 times
Reputation: 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by denise817 View Post
I was born, raised and still live in Schuylkill COunty (30 yrs later) ...and I'm desperately trying to get out!
I would definitely stay away from Mahanoy City and Shenandoah. The towns are dirty. My husband teaches at the Mahanoy area high school and the district has a rating of 60% low income families. That's way more than even a big city like Harrisburg! Shenandoah is slowly becoming an immigrant town of spanish decent. A lot of them don't speak english.

I guess it depends on your age, whether you have kids, and what kind of life you are lookihng for, but I for one can't wait to save up enough money so i'm able to move out! I could go on and on but I will spare everyone of my rants.

WoW, Denise! I sincerely hope you got out of Schuylkill County. I read your other posts and know that you were looking for another home. I went to Mahanoy Area, and moved into Shenandoah. I think that it is truly disgusting that you would call them dirty! Your reasoning for calling them dirty is a direct reflection of your obvious ignorance. Low income families and hispanics do not make places DIRTY! I also hope that your husband (which obviously must tell you all about the dirty children he teaches because a woman of your class, ahem..., would never step foot into those towns) doesn't teach his students the same idiotic notions. These areas are underdeveloped and do have many non english speaking folks living there, however, I do not believe that the problems that the coal regions are dealing with are soley due to the people that live there. I am an educated young woman with a family. I do not drink. I speak english. I live in Shenandoah. I work a full-time job and it is actually a good one! I am a contributing member of society and my contributions go into this small county. I am here to do good things and would welcome anyone to do the same. Rather than run away so you never see tumble weed blowing in the streets, grab a broom and trash bag and clean it up. Credit the fine people that live in Schuylkill County for all that they do to empower themselves to create a better way of life and stay here to do it, rather than down them and call them dirty because they are below poverty and spanish.
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Old 02-05-2008, 10:31 PM
 
59 posts, read 299,339 times
Reputation: 25
Schuylkill County will probably never have the level of population or success it had during the coal mining heyday...However, that doesn't make it a bad place to live or visit. it carries a slower pace of life, and tight knit towns...Since when was high school football or the local polka dance so evil? because rock and rap and the nfl is what is on the TV? It's different there, sure, its like going back in time in some ways...There's so much potential though, the right people trying the right things can really change the downturn around, and i think thats viewable already in orwigsburg with the new developments starting to pop up off route 61, the new st clair shopping center(forget what store occupies most of it)..slowly but surely, coal country can comeback. I'd live there someday, absolutely. Theres no pressure to keep up with the joneses at all..
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