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Old 09-06-2006, 06:37 PM
 
Location: Marshall-Shadeland, Pittsburgh, PA
32,234 posts, read 74,232,802 times
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Then you have Scranton's extensive network of suburbs. The most popular one among young families is an area called "The Abingtons", just to the northwest of the city proper, and includes such communities as Clarks Summit, Waverly, Clarks Green, Dalton, and South Abington. Basically, this area is "Stepford on Steroids!" LOL! South Abington is teeming with cookie-cutter housing developments and chain stores along Northern Boulevard. Clarks Summit is a bit more "chic", with posh boutiques adorning downtown's "State Street." Clarks Green is largely an "old money" residential community full of retired professionals. Waverly is a village that is on the National Historic Register, and has leafy streets. Dalton is a non-descript, rural hamlet to the north of Waverly. Altogether, you'll find the region's most expensive housing options here, ranging from "in-town" properties in Clarks Summit at $175,000 up to the seven-figure range for historic seven-bedroom "carriage house estates" in Waverly or Dalton. Housing in South Abington's newer developments usually range between $200,000-$400,000, depending on, quite honestly, the "snootiness" level of the homes. LOL! I suppose the Abingtons are a decent place to call home (if you can afford 'em), but high property taxes affiliated with the Abington Heights School District (ranked among the highest in the state), and increasing traffic issues on Routes 6/11, the main commuter belt between Clarks Summit and Scranton, totally turn me off. (It's also probably the SAFEST part of the metro though, if you're still interested). ;o)

You also have an area to the south of Scranton known as "North Pocono", which is an "up-and-coming" suburban area. Communities here include Moscow, Thornhurst, Clifton, Elmhurst, Spring Brook, Daleville, Mount Cobb, and Madisonville. While still primarily rural in character, I foresee North Pocono becoming the "next Abingtons" as the years progress, as local elected officials rubber stamp any and all new housing developments. Also affecting the North Pocono area is pressure from neighboring Monroe County, as some NY/NJ commuters are beginning to spill over into North Pocono's housing developments. This region, while currently considered by most (including myself) to be a great, wide-open area, is probably going to become just as "snooty" and just as congested as the Abingtons currently are in the next 10-15 years, so if you're looking to move to PA "long-term", then consider a part of North Pocono where it appears as if surrounding land is unavailable for development of homes or strip malls. Housing prices here can range from $175,000 for a rancher along a rural road on an acre of land up to $700,000 in some prestigious neighborhoods, such as Harmony Hills, although a few "fixer-upper bargains" can still be found.

To the northeast of Scranton lies a network of small former mining towns that comprise the "Mid Valley." Included here are towns such as Archbald, Olyphant, Throop, Dickson City, Mayfield, Jessup, Jermyn, and Blakely. Neighborhoods here are safe and established, albeit usually a bit on the "elderly" side. Housing prices here are still very affordable; Homes under $100,000 are quite common. In fact $100,000 would get you a traditional two-story home on a side street in Olyphant on a typical in-town lot (50' x 150'), with three bedrooms, one and a half bathrooms, a living room, kitchen, dining room, and family room, and a fenced-in yard. Homes such as these would need very minor cosmetic updates (often the elderly former occupants didn't care much to keep decorating standards "up to snuff"), so interior painting, wallpapering, etc. would be required. For some reason or other, people in the Mid-Valley also had a habit, from what I understand, in the 1960s and 1970s of covering up their hardwood floors with carpeting. As such, if you look at an older home in any of these communities, ask your realtor if you can pull up a corner of carpeting to see if there are indeed beautiful, original hardwood floors (Most homes in the "coal towns" were built around 1900).

Finally, there's Greater Pittston, MY current location, about ten to fifteen minutes south of Scranton and ten to fifteen minutes north of Wilkes-Barre. Here in extreme northern Luzerne County (Scranton is in Lackawanna County, by the way), you'll find safe neighborhoods, ranging from in-town fixer-uppers in Pittston proper up to stately homes in ritzier subdivisions such as Quail Hill, Willow View, Highland Hills, Glenmaura, etc. I won't go into much detail about Pittston, since I don't want to seem too biased, but I truly do feel as if our convenient location to both cities is definitely worth looking into.
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Old 09-07-2006, 02:28 AM
 
41 posts, read 119,476 times
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Thank you so much ScrantonWilkesBarre, I appreciate all the info and your time for writing it. I am going to show my husband tomorrow night when he gets out of work. Eventually we will both be going back to school and getting our degrees. I plan on a trip june 1st and stay 5 or 6 days, apply for jobs and look at the areas you mentioned. We won't be buying a house right away, but Im sure we will have pleanty of talks about if we are going to settle down there or not. We will be wanting to start a family within a few years.

At first I had my heart on the pittsburgh area, but realized that it may be a struggle going to visit family. I may want to move away right now but I think eventually I would think if we lived 8 hours away and we have kids, it might be harder then if we only lived 3 hours away.
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Old 11-09-2006, 05:00 PM
 
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A good place to raise kids and have a family is in the Abingtons. Although called ritzy and snobby by outsiders, not everyone here is like that. South Abington Township is continually growing with developments, but it's not a bad place to live. South Abington Rec. Park is a perfect place to bring children to play. Neighborhoods in South Abington range from developments, 30 years old homes, and a few quieter ones. Clarks Summit has become very crowded, but there are nicer neighborhoods there than in South Abington in my opinion. Clarks Green avoids the busy populated areas of Clarks Summit and is a much more quieter retreat. Our Lady of Peace School is in Clarks Green, and a lot of students from Clarks Green are enrolled at that school. Just north of Clarks Green is Waverly, which is the wealthiest and oldest community of the Abingtons. Waverly is considered "old money," but it's also a great place to raise kids with Waverly Community House Park and the Waverly Elementary School. Just west of Waverly is the town of Dalton, which is a "middle class" version of Waverly. It's more of a quieter, friendlier town however it has it's share of "old money" and rich snobs. Dalton doesn't have as much population or crowded neighborhoods like Clarks Summit, but it isn't too rural or far away. The largest rural area of the Abingtons is Newton-Ransom. The public school district for the Abingtons is the Abington Heights School District located in Clarks Summit, PA. Abington Heights has been ranked the top 100 school districts to live in by Money magazine and is "top-notch" in northeastern Pennsylvania. Although it seems the school has paid more attention towards athletics, it still keeps the tradition of quality education for students living in Clarks Summit, South Abington, Waverly, Dalton, and Newton-Ransom. The Lackawanna Trail School District is much smaller that Abington Heights and is located just north of Abington. That school seems to "Lack" a lot of opportunity for students but it isn't a bad school. I wouldn't recommend that school compared to Abington Heights. Good Luck.
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Old 11-09-2006, 05:19 PM
 
Location: Marshall-Shadeland, Pittsburgh, PA
32,234 posts, read 74,232,802 times
Reputation: 18434
Quote:
Originally Posted by dltn46 View Post
A good place to raise kids and have a family is in the Abingtons. Although called ritzy and snobby by outsiders, not everyone here is like that. South Abington Township is continually growing with developments, but it's not a bad place to live. South Abington Rec. Park is a perfect place to bring children to play. Neighborhoods in South Abington range from developments, 30 years old homes, and a few quieter ones. Clarks Summit has become very crowded, but there are nicer neighborhoods there than in South Abington in my opinion. Clarks Green avoids the busy populated areas of Clarks Summit and is a much more quieter retreat. Our Lady of Peace School is in Clarks Green, and a lot of students from Clarks Green are enrolled at that school. Just north of Clarks Green is Waverly, which is the wealthiest and oldest community of the Abingtons. Waverly is considered "old money," but it's also a great place to raise kids with Waverly Community House Park and the Waverly Elementary School. Just west of Waverly is the town of Dalton, which is a "middle class" version of Waverly. It's more of a quieter, friendlier town however it has it's share of "old money" and rich snobs. Dalton doesn't have as much population or crowded neighborhoods like Clarks Summit, but it isn't too rural or far away. The largest rural area of the Abingtons is Newton-Ransom. The public school district for the Abingtons is the Abington Heights School District located in Clarks Summit, PA. Abington Heights has been ranked the top 100 school districts to live in by Money magazine and is "top-notch" in northeastern Pennsylvania. Although it seems the school has paid more attention towards athletics, it still keeps the tradition of quality education for students living in Clarks Summit, South Abington, Waverly, Dalton, and Newton-Ransom. The Lackawanna Trail School District is much smaller that Abington Heights and is located just north of Abington. That school seems to "Lack" a lot of opportunity for students but it isn't a bad school. I wouldn't recommend that school compared to Abington Heights. Good Luck.
I concur with everything you said, and I'm sorry that I generalized all residents of the Abingtons as "posh." (Mmmm..this crow that I'm eating tastes delicious!) LOL! The one good thing about the traffic congestion in Clarks Summit is that the motorists up there are actually chivalrous enough to STOP to allow pedestrians to cross at crosswalks in the Downtown area (It's a state low in PA to do so, but most local residents are too ignorant to adhere to them, as I've learned on my daily runs as I've nearly been mowed over countless times by people making right-hand turns on red WITHOUT first yielding to pedestrians in the crosswalks!)

I'm not talking about Newton/Ransom, or any of the original homesteading families in the Abingtons who have held onto their land and have not succumbed to the tempation of selling out their pristine woodlands for half-acre building lots! I'm moreso referring to the newer subdivisions, that you even have to admit, are just to "show off!" What married professional couple without children actually needs a $700,000 McMansion with five bedrooms, four bathrooms, a three-car garage, media rooms, etc.? Everyone has economic choices in life; if I were fortunate enough to command a salary high enough to afford a home in the upper-six-figure range in a new development in the Abingtons, I wouldn't dare blow it all on trying to "impress the colleagues/family/family friends, etc." (which is what I envision the motive behind purchasing such extravagant homes to be!) Instead, I'd live a comfortable life, putting my excess funds to good use for the betterment of the community. For example, wealthy West Pittston businessman Clifford K. Melberger, president of Diversified in Downtown Scranton, recently made a generous culturally-enriching decision for needy children in Scranton's slums by offering them a new "music center" where these children can play a piano, a saxophone, a violin, etc., whereas they otherwise never would have been able to be exposed to the arts. Clifford, (If I'm thinking about the same generous man here), resides in a middle-class neighborhood in West Pittston. Could he have used the money that he funneled into that new music complex to put towards a down payment on a new McMansion in the Abingtons to "keep up with the Jones's?" Of course! However, his self-sacrifice in putting his wealth towards the benefit of the urban community amazes me! I think our area would be better off with fewer "keepin' up the social image" people trying to outdo each other with extravagance as opposed to more people like Mr. Melberger, who just say "***** the Jones's", and does something extraordinary.
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Old 03-13-2008, 04:27 PM
 
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The Abingtons are not all that posh or ritzy. Though there are sections of wealth most of the region is middle class with many blue collar families.
Also, there is no such place as Newton-Ransom. They are two distinct townships and Ransom does not consider itself part of the Abingtons as Newton does.
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