U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Pennsylvania
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 09-22-2006, 02:26 PM
 
4,330 posts, read 8,645,425 times
Reputation: 4122

Advertisements

Stop Rendell and his big government policies that are putting this state in debt. Vote Lynn Swann in November!
Rate this post positively

 
Old 09-22-2006, 02:30 PM
 
Location: Florida but not for long :) :)
1,130 posts, read 1,437,285 times
Reputation: 50
Ok, if I am there, you got it!! (still trying to sell here in Florida) We may be there though, we have a few serious buyers
Rate this post positively
 
Old 09-22-2006, 03:28 PM
 
2,259 posts, read 7,275,627 times
Reputation: 962
Rendell is great. Swann has no chance.
Rate this post positively
 
Old 10-11-2006, 10:15 PM
 
2,259 posts, read 7,275,627 times
Reputation: 962
Quote:
Originally Posted by SayNo2PA View Post
TOTALLY. Rendell is a CROOK !! He's always greasy looking & reminds me of some creepy traveling salesman.

My DH had to wait SIX mos for his new bullet proof vest (the previous ones that PA bought deteriorated) while Rendell gave himself a 2.5yr retrograded pay raise.
Murtha is an $#^%#^N also

Rendell did not accept the raise for himself. Murtha is a hero.
Rate this post positively
 
Old 10-11-2006, 10:19 PM
 
Location: Marshall-Shadeland, Pittsburgh, PA
32,200 posts, read 74,166,248 times
Reputation: 18394
As I'm still an undecided voter, can anyone tell me the candidates' viewpoints on curtailing the urban sprawl epidemic plaguing our countryside, which I personally see as being the MOST pressing overall issue facing our state's economic vitality? I know Gov. Rendell was a big proponent of reinvestment in small cities (something I approve of), but I just haven't seem much in the way of "progress" in that respect during his tenure. What is Lynn Swann's approach towards downtown revitalizations, growth boundaries, preservation of open space, etc.? When you think about it, the continual "white flight" phenomenon is costing the state MORE and MORE annually, as we have to provide services on new exurban frontiers that we never had to previously.

I know I sound like a nerd here, but where does each stand? Thanks!
Rate this post positively
 
Old 10-12-2006, 07:17 AM
 
1,005 posts, read 1,757,656 times
Reputation: 656
Hello -

Sorry to sound naive, but what is "urban sprawl"? I've seen it used on many state's forums with a negative context, but I actually don't know the definition.

Thank you... Baltic_Celt
Rate this post positively
 
Old 10-12-2006, 07:32 AM
 
Location: Marshall-Shadeland, Pittsburgh, PA
32,200 posts, read 74,166,248 times
Reputation: 18394
Quote:
Originally Posted by Baltic_Celt View Post
Hello -

Sorry to sound naive, but what is "urban sprawl"? I've seen it used on many state's forums with a negative context, but I actually don't know the definition.

Thank you... Baltic_Celt
It's basically just haphazard, cookie-cutter, low density residential zoning that you see springing up in our countrysides. For an example, think of the way L.A. is depicted---Just sp-r--a---w----l-----i------n-------g out for miles and miles with one and two-story buildings for miles upon miles away from the city center. While sprawl may be justified in rapidly-growing areas such as southern California, where new homes and businesses must continually be constructed to support the growing population, it certainly isn't justified in Scranton/Wilkes-Barre, where we've continued to shed population drastically for the past several decades. Over that same time period, we've increased the amount of land we've developed for strip malls, industrial parks, housing developments, etc. by 20%! In essence, we're just spreading less and less people out over a wider and wider area. To me, this is bad for a myriad of reasons; the first and foremost being the fact that all of these newly-developed areas need new services (roadways, schools, police protection, fire protection, utlities, etc.), which has to come out of the state's already thin pocketbook. In order to compensate for all of these new services, existing services in other, urbanized areas are getting cut, which angers people in THESE areas and fuels the fire for even MORE wasteful land use as people try to move to areas where they perceive there are "better" services available.

On a local scale, try to think of what happened to Wilkes-Barre after the 1972 Hurricane Agnes flood vs. what happened in the Back Mountain/Dallas area in the years after; Wilkes-Barre collapsed and the Back Mountain has continued to grow so quickly that traffic congestion, school overcrowding, and water runoff issues are now a hotly-debated topic in that once-rural area. (That is now home to 30,000 people, and will eclipse Wilkes-Barre in population by around 2020 if current trends continue!)
Rate this post positively
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Closed Thread


Settings
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2020 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Pennsylvania

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:44 PM.

© 2005-2023, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top