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View Poll Results: What is Your Favorite State Bordering Pennsylvania?
Ohio 9 12.86%
West Virginia 13 18.57%
Maryland 5 7.14%
Delaware 6 8.57%
New Jersey 14 20.00%
New York 23 32.86%
Voters: 70. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 12-17-2013, 12:03 PM
 
Location: Marshall-Shadeland, Pittsburgh, PA
32,597 posts, read 77,136,154 times
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I lurk in some of the state forums in New England, and one member there has made this same inquiry on a few of them. They have evolved into interesting discussions that let residents of a state express their viewpoints of states around them. For purposes of this discussion please vote for your favorite state that borders Pennsylvania and then reply with how you arrived at your decision. You can feel free to share personal vignettes, anecdotes, vacation memories, statistics, etc. to help support your position. I have a feeling this may be an interesting thread to peruse since our Commonwealth is considered culturally Northeastern, Mid-Atlantic, Great Lakes, and quasi-Midwestern depending upon which corner you may find yourself within, so we have a great melting pot of experiences with surrounding states to draw from for discussion.
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Old 12-17-2013, 12:08 PM
 
Location: Marshall-Shadeland, Pittsburgh, PA
32,597 posts, read 77,136,154 times
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I voted for New York. I feel as if Pennsylvania and New York are both great examples of housing a very diverse array of living options and different built environments to enjoy. We in Pennsylvania are simultaneously home to large cities like Philadelphia and Pittsburgh along with some of the most remote municipalities east of the Mississippi River. We have old and historic as well as shiny and new. Similarly New York houses Greater New York City/Long Island for a world-class cosmopolitan experience, but it also has the Adirondacks, Catskills, Finger Lakes, a portion of the Thousand Islands, and a portion of two Great Lakes for natural splendor, not to mention Niagara Falls. There are New England-like villages complete with town squares along with older Rust Belt cities trying to reinvent themselves (i.e. Binghamton, Elmira, Buffalo). You have Ithaca, which is noted for being a liberal mecca, and then you also have some very socially conservative areas not far away. I would love to live in the middle of Upstate New York (perhaps Cortland) and be within a half-day's drive of any sort of environment imaginable for a getaway.

West Virginia is just about entirely rural in nature. Its "major cities" such as Morgantown, Charleston, or Huntington are all rather small in stature. While the scenery is breathtaking (especially the New River Gorge and Seneca Rocks) I'd have no cure if I had the "city itch". Ohio has a lot going for it, but New York still edged it out for me personally because I lean left politically (as does NY) while Ohio leans right politically. We enjoy day-tripping to the Youngstown area to partake in a great art museum, splendid parks, and a great farmers' market with a fraction of the crowds to which we've become accustomed in Pittsburgh. Cleveland is a decent city, but I do prefer Pittsburgh. Columbus doesn't do much for me. I really love Cincinnati the best out of the "Three C's" because it reminds me the most of my current hometown with its hills, historic architecture, and dense population. Otherwise a lot of Ohio's urban landscape is bleak. I have a hard time finding places like Toledo, Ashtabula, Steubenville, Akron, or Dayton to be aesthetically pleasing. Some parts of these cities seem post-apocalyptic. Maryland is a great state, but it is largely being overtaken by urban sprawl pressures from both Baltimore and DC. The entire middle 1/3 of the state is sprawl-threatened, and I want no part in a state that is doing nothing to control it. I honestly don't know much about Delaware other than the fact that it's very small---industrial in the north, agricultural in the central and southwestern areas, and touristy in the southeast. New Jersey, like Maryland, seems to be very sprawl-threatened. Instead of working to reinvigorate places like Camden, Newark, Paterson, Trenton, etc. the state is letting sprawl take over.

Last edited by SteelCityRising; 12-17-2013 at 01:10 PM..
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Old 12-17-2013, 12:55 PM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
14,164 posts, read 22,530,826 times
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New York is the state that's most similar to Pennsylvania.
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Old 12-17-2013, 04:06 PM
 
Location: Philly
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baltimore has improved immensely, certainly moreso than camden or trenton. newark's ironbound is a great place but downtown newark is pretty awful and so close to manhattan. wilmington could be a great little city but urban renewal wiped so much out and it just lacks energy.
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Old 12-17-2013, 04:09 PM
 
Location: North by Northwest
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gnutella View Post
New York is the state that's most similar to Pennsylvania.
That's true as a whole. I'm personally partial to NJ (South Jersey in particular) because it's the most similar to SE PA.

Also, LOL at the State just "letting" Camden continue to deteriorate. There have been more than a few failed efforts to revitalize the place. The several square blocks around RU-C plus the Aquarium and Susquehanna Bank Center along the waterfront are inhabitable. Also, AFAIK, Newark is starting to see a turnaround, and, of course, Jersey City and Hoboken are quite gentrified.
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Old 12-17-2013, 04:36 PM
 
Location: Philly
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HeavenWood View Post
That's true as a whole. I'm personally partial to NJ (South Jersey in particular) because it's the most similar to SE PA.

Also, LOL at the State just "letting" Camden continue to deteriorate. There have been more than a few failed efforts to revitalize the place. The several square blocks around RU-C plus the Aquarium and Susquehanna Bank Center along the waterfront are inhabitable. Also, AFAIK, Newark is starting to see a turnaround, and, of course, Jersey City and Hoboken are quite gentrified.
I think that northern maryland is extremely similar to PA, it's the same geography. new jersey is geographically like northeast philly and perhaps south philly as well as most of delaware. how did nj try to revitalize camden? by knocking down the waterfront and trying to build an isolated village of prosperity. Newark is improving bit by bit but I was shocked at how run down it was and that was this year, after the corey booker hype. cape may is a beautiful place but atlantic city's continued struggles are mind boggling, it's on the friggin ocean!
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Old 12-17-2013, 04:41 PM
 
Location: North by Northwest
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pman View Post
I think that northern maryland is extremely similar to PA, it's the same geography. new jersey is geographically like northeast philly and perhaps south philly as well as most of delaware. how did nj try to revitalize camden? by knocking down the waterfront and trying to build an isolated village of prosperity. Newark is improving bit by bit but I was shocked at how run down it was and that was this year, after the corey booker hype. cape may is a beautiful place but atlantic city's continued struggles are mind boggling, it's on the friggin ocean!
South Jersey is below the fall line/on the coastal plain, so topographically, it's like most of the City, plus parts of inner DelCo and Lower Bucks.

And AC continues to struggle, but Margate/Longport are still doing quite well.
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Old 12-17-2013, 04:48 PM
 
3,463 posts, read 5,618,779 times
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I lived all over PA. I would say upstate New York and West Virginia are mine. You can keep Jersey, take Philly with it, Delaware, mehhh, maybe around the Delmarva peninsula, no thanks to anywhere above there. I had to commute from Philly area to Vermont a while ago and there just seemed to be a weird magic feeling as soon as I hit the NY Thruway. Very nice ride. As a nature boy, West Virginia has stayed pretty much unmolested. Very desirable to me. Marylands OK in some parts, but as many parts are Wrong Turn/Deliverance scary. Mean drivers, too
But yeah, Upstate NY
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Old 12-17-2013, 04:50 PM
 
Location: North by Northwest
9,291 posts, read 12,863,842 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thunderkat59 View Post
I lived all over PA. I would say upstate New York and West Virginia are mine. You can keep Jersey, take Philly with it, Delaware, mehhh, maybe around the Delmarva peninsula, no thanks to anywhere above there. I had to commute from Philly area to Vermont a while ago and there just seemed to be a weird magic feeling as soon as I hit the NY Thruway. Very nice ride. As a nature boy, West Virginia has stayed pretty much unmolested. Very desirable to me. Marylands OK in some parts, but as many parts are Wrong Turn/Deliverance scary. Mean drivers, too
But yeah, Upstate NY
Great post, Lion-o! *snarf* *snarf*.
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Old 12-17-2013, 04:52 PM
 
Location: Philly
10,205 posts, read 16,689,069 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HeavenWood View Post
South Jersey is below the fall line/on the coastal plain, so topographically, it's like most of the City, plus parts of inner DelCo and Lower Bucks.

And AC continues to struggle, but Margate/Longport are still doing quite well.
technically the fall line runs from overbrook area though germantown, and roughly follows route 1. like anything, actual change is gradual. most of the city was hills and streams like the rest of PA. much of it was graded for development. thus, large swaths of the city are not even like south jersey and certainly most of the state is not. south jersey is essentially a giant flood plain that protects philadelphia from coastal storms.
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