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Old 05-12-2011, 01:18 PM
 
1 posts, read 3,165 times
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Hey all,

I'm a 24-year old gearing up to move from Brooklyn to Philly. I've lived in a few different Brooklyn neighborhoods and, if one were to divide the reasonably affordable trendy parts of Brooklyn into hipster Brooklyn (Williamsburg, Bushwick, the northern part of Bed-Stuy) and brownstone Brooklyn (Downtown Brooklyn, Fort Greene, Clinton Hill, Prospect Heights, Crown Heights, Bed-Stuy), then I'm team brownstone Brooklyn 100%.

I'm a HUGE fan of the Pro-Crow (Prospect Heights/Crown Heights) area for its proximity to Prospect Park and the Brooklyn Museum, its laid-back vibe, attractive buildings and tree-lined streets, its diversity, the restaurants and cafes, ample transportation options, and the unpretentious nightlife scene. I also lived in the North Bronx for awhile and really enjoyed that for the vibrant community activist scene (both Northwest and South Bronx), slower pace of life (compared to Manhattan), sense of community (people have roots there and aren't just stopping through), plethora of urban parkland, and amazing cheap food. Both have interesting local arts scenes, which I've liked.

I'm going to be living in Philly and commuting to Jersey (I refuse to live in Jerz, don't try to convince me), so easy access to 95 is important. I want to be able to get around the city easily, but will have a car so I think access to public transit is not a top priority. I'd like to be able to do a lot of walking to get around. The plus side about moving from NYC to Philly is that it takes much less time to get around (living in BK, I consider a friend or a hangout spot to be "close" if I can get there within a half hour). Outdoor space is a priority for me, but I'm fine as long as it's accessible in under 30 min. In terms of an apartment, I'm looking for as much space as possible in the $700-900 range (from a studio to a 2br).

I'm most strongly considering the Art Museum area and Fishtown right now, but am open to other suggestions. Where should I live?
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Old 05-12-2011, 03:45 PM
 
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Fishtown will generally be more affordable than Art Museum.
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Old 05-12-2011, 07:40 PM
 
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Northern Liberties has a really cool vibe, lots of night life and I would guess more affordable than the Art Museum area plus closer to NJ. Skip Fishtown altogether, still on it's way up.
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Old 05-12-2011, 08:46 PM
 
Location: back in Philadelphia!
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I've always thought that Clinton Hill felt a lot like West Philly (University City). I'd take a look at that area as well, I think you might dig it.
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Old 05-21-2011, 06:57 PM
 
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I seem to have the same tastes as you and am also looking into Philly. Art museum is definitely more brownstone-it sounds like you would like it much more than fishtown. Most if not all of fishtown seems like an unattractive Williamsburg with the conveniences located next door in trendy Northern Liberties. Nolibs is not cheap but it is active, walkable and attractive. There is very little greenery in the residential areas in Nolibs/Fishtown but Art Museum is near the parks. West Philly has a good mix of cheap, walkable, convenient, with trees. Lots more college kids- not sure it feels like a home or a campus. Each of these neighborhoods is limited in size -you reach less walkable or less attractive areas quickly- there are not blocks and blocks and blocks of lovely brownstones like in NY. - note, I have neither lived in NYC or Philly- just have friends and family there.
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Old 05-21-2011, 08:52 PM
 
Location: back in Philadelphia!
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CityChic9 View Post
I seem to have the same tastes as you and am also looking into Philly. Art museum is definitely more brownstone-it sounds like you would like it much more than fishtown. Most if not all of fishtown seems like an unattractive Williamsburg with the conveniences located next door in trendy Northern Liberties. Nolibs is not cheap but it is active, walkable and attractive. There is very little greenery in the residential areas in Nolibs/Fishtown but Art Museum is near the parks. West Philly has a good mix of cheap, walkable, convenient, with trees. Lots more college kids- not sure it feels like a home or a campus. Each of these neighborhoods is limited in size -you reach less walkable or less attractive areas quickly- there are not blocks and blocks and blocks of lovely brownstones like in NY. - note, I have neither lived in NYC or Philly- just have friends and family there.
I don't think West Philly is THAT much more 'collegey' than Clinton Hill with Pratt. It is definitely a very real neighborhood with it's own identity and lots of people calling it home.

Neighborhoods in Philly are definitely way smaller and less well-defined than neighborhoods in Brooklyn. But Brooklyn is a much bigger place than Philly (almost a million more people), and there's a LOT more gentrification (too much, IMO!) but even in neighborhoods like Park Slope & Fort Greene, the fancy brownstone sections do give way to some raggedy looking areas pretty quickly if you go one way or other.

Also, I disagree with your characterization of Fishtown. It has attractive parts, and a growing number of things to do in the neighborhood, including some of the city's best bars & music venues.
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Old 05-21-2011, 09:13 PM
 
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I don't know a lot about fishtown. I know it has a lot of little shops popping up here and there. Definitely a neighborhood with some stuff going on, and it seems like that is going to continue to be the case. But I didn't notice any particularly attractive areas, nothing with a brownstone or parklike feel anyhow. Where are the more attractive areas?
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Old 05-21-2011, 10:24 PM
 
Location: back in Philadelphia!
3,263 posts, read 5,623,357 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CityChic9 View Post
I don't know a lot about fishtown. I know it has a lot of little shops popping up here and there. Definitely a neighborhood with some stuff going on, and it seems like that is going to continue to be the case. But I didn't notice any particularly attractive areas, nothing with a brownstone or parklike feel anyhow. Where are the more attractive areas?
There just aren't many proper brownstones anywhere in Philadelphia period (a few, yes, but it wasn't remotely as big a thing as it was in New York 150 years ago). It's largely a bricks & schist kind of town. If you're looking for Brownstone Brooklyn, you will not find in in Philly. Philly's got it's own thing.
I'm not a huuge fan of Fishtown (old grudges die hard), and it isn't the most beautiful neighborhood, but it doesn't have a bunch of ramshackle frame & siding buildings like Williamsburg. There are historic areas and lots of perfectly nice brick rowhouses. It's really not hugely different from the Art Museum area, architecturally. The demographics are different, and it's a lot cheaper, but those aren't necessarily bad things.

Here's a block I like (streetview link):

Montgomery Ave, Fishtown

And Fishtown has Penn Treaty Park, which is a nice place to be.

Friends of Penn Treaty Park


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Old 05-21-2011, 10:45 PM
 
46 posts, read 98,438 times
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Which is easier to get around town from with out a car - Fishtown or Art Museum?
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Old 05-21-2011, 11:31 PM
 
Location: back in Philadelphia!
3,263 posts, read 5,623,357 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CityChic9 View Post
Which is easier to get around town from with out a car - Fishtown or Art Museum?
I'd say overall Fishtown has somewhat better public transportation access, with the El (Market/Frankford Line) stop at Front & Girard.

Lots of people bike too though, and the southern part of the Art Museum area is closer in to center city and overall a little easier to bike (or walk) to & from than a lot of Fishtown.
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