Welcome to City-Data.com Forum!
U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Pennsylvania > Philadelphia
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 09-04-2013, 07:30 AM
 
Location: The City
22,378 posts, read 38,888,203 times
Reputation: 7976

Advertisements

http://blog.philadelphiarealestate.c...-station-area/
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 09-04-2013, 07:39 AM
 
Location: Center City
7,528 posts, read 10,250,389 times
Reputation: 11023
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarketStEl View Post
The author replies:

The photo I chose to accompany my essay probably wasn't the best one to run with it, because that building is cheap, looks it, and has a bunch of architectural problems that will keep it from aging well, like that all-out-of-proportion mock-classical cornice on what's otherwise a strictly Modernist knockoff box.

But I still maintain that some of the buildings that make up today's "background" - the night sky against which the stars shine - were probably of similar quality and character when built. The difference may well be that the builders did understand things like proportion and context when they built them, things that clearly escaped the grasp of the builder of the house in the photo. I've seen other Modernist boxes equipped with metal or stucco tumors that don't look all that bad considering, and those may well recede into tomorrow's background. You might also want to read the full blog post I linked to for a better elaboration of this argument.
I concur with you that the house you chose to feature in your essay was a bad choice. I also think it was a bad choice to be built in the city. I won't repeat my reasons again. I read your full blog. If you are thinking the building from KC is a better choice, again, I don't concur. I am all for density. I just don't think it has to be ugly or cheap. I believe it is just as easy to design an attractive building as an unattractive building. The cheap materials used to construct such a building will not fare well in the decades ahead. I say this as relatively new transplant after a long sojourn in Houston. I have seen how cheaply constructed buildings rapidly decline in appearance and invite similar construction in their vicinity. They are simply a way to developers to make a fast buck and move on. It is a sunbelt, boom mindset - it will only last 25 years so who cares? I would truly hate to see Philly go down that road.

Near the end of your article you state: "These buildings below are indicative of the unremarkable structures designed and built by people in an earlier era. They cared about the simple beauty of buildings, and we collectively cherish what they left us now." Indeed they have stood the test of time. While I find them simple, I also find them remarkable. They are not the signature buildings of their street, but they are attractive and architecturally interesting. I'm sure this was the intent of the owner when he built them. Let's continue that mindset today.

I don't buy the case for unremarkable architecture. Even the simplest and humblest of buildings should be built to last and possess their own beauty, no matter how simple or humble. I do not wish to derail ths thread, but wanted to reply. If you are so inclined, I will grant you the last word.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-04-2013, 09:05 AM
 
Location: Center City
7,528 posts, read 10,250,389 times
Reputation: 11023
High rise on Schuylkill near park given green light by city: Tower near Schuylkill River Park wins design approval
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-04-2013, 11:03 AM
 
Location: The Left Toast
1,303 posts, read 1,895,774 times
Reputation: 981
New Casino by Wynn? Wynn casino project manager: Here's why we're Philly's best bet
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-04-2013, 06:19 PM
 
13 posts, read 25,987 times
Reputation: 18
That would be pretty amazing if it happened. It would help University City expand west and north and help the surrounding area on all sides. It is weird to think that American Bandstand was filmed right at that intersection for years.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-04-2013, 06:22 PM
 
Location: Cumberland County, NJ
8,632 posts, read 12,990,645 times
Reputation: 5766
Quote:
Originally Posted by BillyJacc View Post
I hope Wynn does win. They city doesn't need a Casino in Market East. Putting a casino on the riverfront makes a lot more sense if you ask me.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-05-2013, 07:56 AM
 
Location: Center City
7,528 posts, read 10,250,389 times
Reputation: 11023
Quote:
Originally Posted by gwillyfromphilly View Post
I hope Wynn does win. They city doesn't need a Casino in Market East. Putting a casino on the riverfront makes a lot more sense if you ask me.
I'm really kinda torn on the whole Market East proposal. First of all, I am almost reflexively against casinos. Rather than deliver on their promise of improving neighborhoods, they tend to do the opposite by focusing all their energies inward toward the tables, while turning their backs to the street. One need only look to AC to see how that played out. Or SugarHouse. For that reason, I'd say pick the location that is most out of the way and be done with it.

Still, part of me wonders . . . Blatstein has a pretty good track record in NoLibs and elsewhere. We've got that big white elephant of the old Inquirer building sitting there. Who is going to do anything with that? It takes someone with money and a vision, and they don't come across that often. I think the location, near the convention center, could make good commercial sense. And think how it might work together with the Divine Lorraine to jump start the North Broad renaissance folks keep waiting for.

All this said, I would have two caveats on The Provence. First is that the design be much improved. In renderings it looks like Vegas on North Broad and that's not a good fit for the city. Make it less plastic and more substantial. Secondly, I would want a guarantee that there be extensive and good commercial space at street level, along with commitment by some high profile retailers (say, a Starr restaurant or a Ted Montanas) before any approvals are made.

I know this is not how the business of granting casino licenses works. I'm just offering my thoughts on some of the benefits of Blatstein's proposal, if done well. I'm sure long time Philadelphians have some insights I lack, so I am happy to get some pushback and be further informed.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-05-2013, 11:15 AM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
14,147 posts, read 9,038,713 times
Reputation: 10491
Quote:
Originally Posted by jm02 View Post
I'm really kinda torn on the whole Market East proposal. First of all, I am almost reflexively against casinos. Rather than deliver on their promise of improving neighborhoods, they tend to do the opposite by focusing all their energies inward toward the tables, while turning their backs to the street. One need only look to AC to see how that played out. Or SugarHouse. For that reason, I'd say pick the location that is most out of the way and be done with it.

Still, part of me wonders . . . Blatstein has a pretty good track record in NoLibs and elsewhere. We've got that big white elephant of the old Inquirer building sitting there. Who is going to do anything with that? It takes someone with money and a vision, and they don't come across that often. I think the location, near the convention center, could make good commercial sense. And think how it might work together with the Divine Lorraine to jump start the North Broad renaissance folks keep waiting for.

All this said, I would have two caveats on The Provence. First is that the design be much improved. In renderings it looks like Vegas on North Broad and that's not a good fit for the city. Make it less plastic and more substantial. Secondly, I would want a guarantee that there be extensive and good commercial space at street level, along with commitment by some high profile retailers (say, a Starr restaurant or a Ted Montanas) before any approvals are made.

I know this is not how the business of granting casino licenses works. I'm just offering my thoughts on some of the benefits of Blatstein's proposal, if done well. I'm sure long time Philadelphians have some insights I lack, so I am happy to get some pushback and be further informed.
Personally, I like Blatstein's proposal the best of all of them precisely because it struck me as an urban entertainment complex with a casino tossed in as an afterthought.

But a builder who knows the industry told me it won't work as a casino, a message he's also delivered via several other reporters. Here's my version:

How Traffic, A Changing Market and Knowing His Tomatoes May Make a Winner Out of Wynn | Property: Real Estate and Neighborhood Chatter

The saving grace here is this: if Blatstein doesn't get the license, he will figure out something to do with the old Inquirer building. If he could make that sow's ear of a State Office Building into silk-purse rental apartments, he will figure out something people will want a piece of at 400 North Broad.

And Eighth and Market's been the site of a series of failed redevelopment proposals. What's one more?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-08-2013, 11:09 AM
 
Location: The City
22,378 posts, read 38,888,203 times
Reputation: 7976
Quote:
Originally Posted by sayitaintso View Post
On 10 Sept COMCAST will announce that it is moving NBC HQ from NYC to Philly. Comcast will construct two new towers at 18th AND 19th and Arch.
No word on if studios will also move. You'd think they'd still have to retain major studio presence in NYC.
This announcement alone is major, but only the tip of the iceberg. Other industries that support the media machine will be forced to tag along. This is easily the biggest economic development news in the last half century.
Thousands of new jobs will be created almost overnight.
What many were calling an apartment bubble now won't even support the number of jobs created by this single event.
What CNN did for Atlanta is what we can expect NBC to do for us.
Welcome to Philadelphia 2.0
We will see, only a few days, this would be interesting though

SkyscraperPage Forum - View Single Post - PHILADELPHIA | The Development Thread VIII
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-08-2013, 11:27 AM
 
Location: The City
22,378 posts, read 38,888,203 times
Reputation: 7976
phillyskyline.com | yo

Why all the rumors about Comcast, NBC and its real estate? - Philadelphia Business Journal
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Settings
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2020 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Pennsylvania > Philadelphia

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2024, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top