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Old 09-03-2015, 08:54 AM
 
Location: Center City
7,529 posts, read 10,316,025 times
Reputation: 11038

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Quote:
Originally Posted by rotodome View Post
Well, I didn't say all, I said typically. It's just the way that retail is heading.
Go to a given store's website and look for the flagship store locations. They are usually, as I said, in big cities not suburban malls.
We may be talking past one another. My point is that only a handful of US cities are anchored by a vibrant live/work/play CCBD. Most of the post-industrial sunbelt cities are anchored by CBDs that function as "office parks" - bustling during the workday but quiet after 5 pm and on weekends.

Take Houston, the city I am most familiar with as an example. There, the flagship stores are located in retail centers that are suburban in nature, even though they are within Houston's 627 sprawling square miles. Houston's two highest-end malls, the Galleria and Memorial Mall, are 8 and 12 miles respectively from its CBD while still being within the city'S political boundaries. While I am not familiar with all sunbelt cities, of those I have visited, their CBDs seem to function similarly as "office parks."

In essence, the point I'm trying to make is just because an internet search reveals that stores carry any given city's zip codes does not necessarily mean that they are in a dense, pedestrian-based setting. More times than not, they will be in car-centered destinations similar to Houston's River Oaks, Dallas's Highland Park or Atlanta's Buckhead.
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Old 09-03-2015, 09:41 AM
 
Location: NYC based - Used to Live in Philly - Transplant from Miami
2,307 posts, read 2,781,820 times
Reputation: 2610
Ah I forget how awesome Galleria Mall is!
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Old 09-03-2015, 09:43 AM
 
Location: NYC based - Used to Live in Philly - Transplant from Miami
2,307 posts, read 2,781,820 times
Reputation: 2610
Quote:
Originally Posted by cpomp View Post
MOMS organic market. Thats nice too, I just like grabbing quick things at Trader Joes, except the one at West Market is always mobbed.
I had never been to MOM's (in DC).
Let us see how it will be.

Yeah that Trader's Joe is always full, with lines all the way down the aisles.
But it is worth it even just to get their pickled dried mango.
Yum. Yum.
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Old 09-03-2015, 10:19 AM
 
Location: back in Philadelphia!
3,266 posts, read 5,676,291 times
Reputation: 2147
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pine to Vine View Post
We may be talking past one another. My point is that only a handful of US cities are anchored by a vibrant live/work/play CCBD. Most of the post-industrial sunbelt cities are anchored by CBDs that function as "office parks" - bustling during the workday but quiet after 5 pm and on weekends.

Take Houston, the city I am most familiar with as an example. There, the flagship stores are located in retail centers that are suburban in nature, even though they are within Houston's 627 sprawling square miles. Houston's two highest-end malls, the Galleria and Memorial Mall, are 8 and 12 miles respectively from its CBD while still being within the city'S political boundaries. While I am not familiar with all sunbelt cities, of those I have visited, their CBDs seem to function similarly as "office parks."

In essence, the point I'm trying to make is just because an internet search reveals that stores carry any given city's zip codes does not necessarily mean that they are in a dense, pedestrian-based setting. More times than not, they will be in car-centered destinations similar to Houston's River Oaks, Dallas's Highland Park or Atlanta's Buckhead.
No argument on the somewhat obvious fact that sunbelt cities are not organized like Philly or the handful of other US cities with traditional downtowns. And Houston, with it's famous lack of zoning, is an exceptionally unwieldy sprawly beast of a city. The point I was making in this thread about retail was about how retail is evolving, and that flagships are typically located in high profile locations within cities, regardless of whether or not they are cities of a similar character to Philly.

I also think it's remarkable (and kind of great) that, since people increasingly want to live in walkable downtown areas, that many cities across the country are actively changing in response to that demand.
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Old 09-03-2015, 10:31 AM
 
Location: Center City
7,529 posts, read 10,316,025 times
Reputation: 11038
^^^ I had a feeling that we were in what is sometimes called "violent agreement."
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Old 09-03-2015, 10:47 AM
 
Location: East Central Pennsylvania/ Chicago for 6yrs.
2,535 posts, read 3,300,823 times
Reputation: 1483
Quote:
Originally Posted by kyb01 View Post
If you are afraid of a a negative responses STOP POSTING HERE.

Once again you are comparing a place that has NEVER had a major physical catastrophe in its entire history with a place that was virtually destroyed by fire. That provided an opportunity to create the avenues you think are superior.

And new street lighting has been installed on many Center City streets.
Another mentioned Miami shopping core having flagship stores. But he is a Insider.. living in Philly now. So he can.
I merely mentioned Chicago in regards here, to its replacing street lights as a IMPROVEMENT. Being many original ones it saved along with reproductions was a plus. I noted its uggggllly ones pre-1980s on, its original shopping street downtown.

It tried different revamping tries costing many millions on its State St. Retail street a couple FAILED times. Like a Mall concept closed off to cars, but not buses. Not the pre-natural gas run kind it has now. They were fume gushers then.

Its last makeover was successful. But again.... I reference Chicago, merely as they replaced streetlights as a improvement aspect, and streetscaping. That was all I referenced Chicago on in that post.

As noted in Past post. One main shopping street there, became mostly suburban regular Mall type stores like Old Navy. The other the Big Gun Retailers.

Walnut and Chestnut could be helped in getting Big Gun retailers to invest. To revamp the streets. Streetscaping for a Better Retail shopping Core. Streetscaping Broad St. Starts it. Can Walnut and Chestnut be next? I merely suggested new streetlights.... noting with Philly's OLDER Architecture. How about antique style? Perhaps as it originally had?

Had nothing to so with narrow streets vs wider. I mentioned that in other post as a negative and got the HEAT.... I addressed now the city CAN DO things to make the most of what it has ON STREET LEVEL? Might help getting the Bigger retailers, all say you want to come in. I thought to try Aesthetically given the streets a Higher Class look. Most want the streets to FULLY become that.

As for the....I am afraid of negative replies... if anything I reply MORE THEN and the smileys and more CAPS come. Disagreements to mine and why it is not feasible or doable I respect. Not...How dare I as a outsider kinds of replies.... That kind is what I suggest spare me from.

Also Retailers want Deals to lure them too. They luv Tax incentives too. Free Tax for some years.

But thanks for replying.

Last edited by steeps; 09-03-2015 at 11:50 AM..
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Old 09-03-2015, 04:24 PM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
14,397 posts, read 9,315,512 times
Reputation: 10712
Quote:
Originally Posted by steeps View Post
Another mentioned Miami shopping core having flagship stores. But he is a Insider.. living in Philly now. So he can.
I merely mentioned Chicago in regards here, to its replacing street lights as a IMPROVEMENT. Being many original ones it saved along with reproductions was a plus. I noted its uggggllly ones pre-1980s on, its original shopping street downtown.
I'm a native of one of the Midwest's second-tier cities (Chicago being the only one in the first tier), and I've seen State Street in three incarnations.

One was with the 1960s triple-headed fluorescent lights (with a fourth back light focused on the sidewalk) on a street with mixed traffic. The street seemed to me pretty bustling in the 1970s.

Then there was the 1980s "transitway," which did for State Street what the one here did for Chestnut, namely, turned it into a zombie shopping district. It was lit by box-headed lamps mounted on tall poles, very much a period piece that has thankfully disappeared.

It looks a lot nicer now with the faux-old street furniture (including subway station entrances that now look older than the subway they serve). If any of the old State Street lights were preserved and reinstalled, great, but I'd be surprised if that were the case.


Quote:
Walnut and Chestnut could be helped in getting Big Gun retailers to invest. To revamp the streets. Streetscaping for a Better Retail shopping Core. Streetscaping Broad St. Starts it. Can Walnut and Chestnut be next? I merely suggested new streetlights.... noting with Philly's OLDER Architecture. How about antique style? Perhaps as it originally had?
I don't know whether you've seen the old teardrop lamps suspended from short brackets with curved braces beneath that were the dominant style of street light on Center City streets other than Broad, but I consider the pedestal lampposts installed by the Center City District in the 1990s an improvement on these.

The street lights on Market Street East and the Ben Franklin Parkway are stripped-down approximations of these older lamps.

The lights on Broad Street are replicas of an older Philadelphia design, and I think they're very handsome.

I was actually quite a fan of the "Philadelphia davit," the squashed quarter-circle aluminum lights that defined this city's streets from the mid-1960s until somewhere around 2000. They were nearly unique to this city (you can also find them on the New Jersey Turnpike Hudson County Spur) and quite clean and contemporary. The dark brown horizontal mast arms that have replaced them are not bad but not as distinctive IMO.
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Old 09-03-2015, 09:56 PM
 
Location: NYC based - Used to Live in Philly - Transplant from Miami
2,307 posts, read 2,781,820 times
Reputation: 2610
Quote:
Originally Posted by steeps View Post
Another mentioned Miami shopping core having flagship stores. But he is a Insider.. living in Philly now. So he can.
That is me ~ the Miami dude. And yes, you can also contribute to the forum even though you don't live here.
I also got heat from time to time, so did everybody else here!
It is a part of discussion - we agree and disagree.
None of us mean you harm or attempt to attack you at personal level.
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Old 09-03-2015, 10:42 PM
 
Location: back in Philadelphia!
3,266 posts, read 5,676,291 times
Reputation: 2147
Quote:
Originally Posted by steeps View Post
Another mentioned Miami shopping core having flagship stores. But he is a Insider.. living in Philly now. So he can.
I merely mentioned Chicago in regards here, to its replacing street lights as a IMPROVEMENT. Being many original ones it saved along with reproductions was a plus. I noted its uggggllly ones pre-1980s on, its original shopping street downtown.

It tried different revamping tries costing many millions on its State St. Retail street a couple FAILED times. Like a Mall concept closed off to cars, but not buses. Not the pre-natural gas run kind it has now. They were fume gushers then.

Its last makeover was successful. But again.... I reference Chicago, merely as they replaced streetlights as a improvement aspect, and streetscaping. That was all I referenced Chicago on in that post.

As noted in Past post. One main shopping street there, became mostly suburban regular Mall type stores like Old Navy. The other the Big Gun Retailers.

Walnut and Chestnut could be helped in getting Big Gun retailers to invest. To revamp the streets. Streetscaping for a Better Retail shopping Core. Streetscaping Broad St. Starts it. Can Walnut and Chestnut be next? I merely suggested new streetlights.... noting with Philly's OLDER Architecture. How about antique style? Perhaps as it originally had?

Had nothing to so with narrow streets vs wider. I mentioned that in other post as a negative and got the HEAT.... I addressed now the city CAN DO things to make the most of what it has ON STREET LEVEL? Might help getting the Bigger retailers, all say you want to come in. I thought to try Aesthetically given the streets a Higher Class look. Most want the streets to FULLY become that.

As for the....I am afraid of negative replies... if anything I reply MORE THEN and the smileys and more CAPS come. Disagreements to mine and why it is not feasible or doable I respect. Not...How dare I as a outsider kinds of replies.... That kind is what I suggest spare me from.

Also Retailers want Deals to lure them too. They luv Tax incentives too. Free Tax for some years.

But thanks for replying.
chain retailers rarely build their own spaces. they typically lease existing spaces or new ones that commercial developers build and pitch to them.
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Old 09-03-2015, 11:36 PM
 
28 posts, read 28,560 times
Reputation: 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by rotodome View Post
chain retailers rarely build their own spaces. they typically lease existing spaces or new ones that commercial developers build and pitch to them.
Not really. In dense areas like Philly/Washington/New York, if the LL is sitting on the gold, they have the power. Retailers will pony up for A real estate in tight markets (IE: As-Is deals, no allowance). Hefty investment but high risk/reward scenario.


On a side note, until Philly gets rid of these degenerate homeless people, retail will stay the same. No one wants to see it outside a store and it's a bad look. Philly needs to clean this up ASAP.
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