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Old 12-08-2015, 04:40 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia, PA
8,701 posts, read 14,772,056 times
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$1 Billion in Demand for Downtown Retail Fuels Dramatic Expansion

Quote:
PHILADELPHIA (December 7, 2015) – More than 183,000 residents, 294,000 workers, 3.1 million occupied hotel room nights and 116,000 college students in or immediately adjacent to Philadelphia’s downtown contribute to Center City’s 24-hour vibrancy and generate more than $1 billion in retail demand, according to a new report released today by the Center City District and Central Philadelphia Development Corporation.

With 76% of the people residing in the core of Center City holding at least a bachelor’s degree and household incomes averaging more than $107,000, Center City’s expanding affluent and highly educated populous has attracted more than 33 national retailers since 2013. These new popular brands augment the strong base of local boutiques and independents that make up 78% of Center City’s tenant mix.

The number of downtown residents has increased 16% since 2000, and millennials entering their peak consumer-spending years represent 40% of this population, due to the fastest growth of America’s 10 largest cities for this demographic. Empty-nesters migrating from the suburbs have contributed to the elevated household incomes.

As Center City’s purchasing power continues to increase, so does the demand in Center City’s 1,017 retailers, including 226 apparel stores, 159 jewelry stores, 137 food and drink retailers, and 117 home and garden establishments. Center City’s 956 food establishments include 440 full-service restaurants and 309 takeout establishments.

Retail rents in Center City have increased more than most peer cities, rising faster than all but Miami, the report noted. Center City’s density, diversity and accessibility create opportunities for retailers seeking to capitalize on changing preferences that are now favoring urban cores in America. Currently, local and national developers are investing $6.7 billion in major projects that are underway or planned for completion within the downtown by 2018. More than 2.3 million square feet are dedicated to retail as older shopping streets are being redeveloped and Philadelphia’s prime retail district, formerly centered on Walnut Street, continues to expand to West Chestnut and east of Broad to Market Street.
CCD/CPDC Release: $1 Billion in Demand for Downtown Retail Fuels Dramatic Expansion

Link to report:
http://www.centercityphila.org/docs/CCR15_retail.pdf
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Old 12-13-2015, 12:27 PM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
14,398 posts, read 9,315,512 times
Reputation: 10715
Quote:
Originally Posted by southbound_295 View Post
That's an understatement. The majority of posters don't understand that Philadelphia used to have a reputation for wretched dining choices. I think that there were 3 choices for a better dining experience, & two were Bookbinders. Old Original Bookbinders was owned by John Taxin (sp?) & Bookbinders on 15th St was owned by the Bookbinder family.
The food culture in Philadephia pre-Restaurant Renaissance was pretty much dominated by meat-and-potatoes, dark-wood-paneled restaurants. A couple of others you left out: Frankie Bradley's, with its plank steaks, and Arthur's. (The former is now an eclectic anything-and-everything-goes bar/pub/nightspot that pays homage to its heritage by adopting its original name [for a long time, it was the lesbian bar/restaurant Sisters] with a "y" where the "ie" was in the first name. A Chipotle Mexican Grill location occupies the site of the latter, which had housed the acclaimed high-end Chinese restaurant Susanna Foo for most of the 1990s and early 2000s.) I ate at one such restaurant in the 'burbs with my ex once: the General Wayne Inn in Merion, now a Hasidic Jewish synagogue and cultural center.

The then-food critic for Philadelphia magazine, where I am now a staffer, wrote a wonderful article ca. 1990 about the evolution of Philadelphia's dining scene. He described the restaurant scene pre-1971 as "The Grownups Serve the Mix-and-Match Menu." The two things I remember from his lengthy description of this old (and boring) restaurant universe were his descriptions of the salad dressings: "(bottled) French, Russian (French with pickle bits), Thousand Island (even more pickle bits)," and his description of "some restaurant on some Horse Pike" on the way to the shore where the bartenders poured generously: "Greedy's 1 1/2! Only miles away!"

What that article noted that's not yet metioned here were "the kids" who opened up eclectic restaurants with funky decor and menus that featured whatever the chef felt like preparing that day, usually posted on a blackboard. Three of them opened at about the same time: the Knave of Hearts (300 block South Street), the Astral Plane (1700 block Lombard, in the former office of an African-American newspaper, front pages of which graced the walls of its bar), and Friday Saturday Sunday (20th and Rittenhouse Square, which had a great matchbook bearing a photo of the kitchen staff on the front and the legend "Friday Saturday Sunday loves you every night." on the back and a great, very intimate bar with a fish tank upstairs; I recall having a tear-filled argument with my ex there the night he decided that rather than move to Boston, I should move to Philly. The place grew on me. What else can I say?) Of those three, which along with Steve Poses' restaurants (Frog on the high end and the Commissary on the low end, later joined by City Bites across from the original Ritz where Positano Coast is now), were the defining restaurants of the Restaurant Renaissance, Friday Saturday Sunday lasted the longest, closing only this past summer when the owner sold it to a buyer who said he was willing to keep the name.

The website now simply has these words: "Coming Soon - 2016." I hope the fish tank survives the transition too.

There was a fourth pillar of the Restaurant Renaissance, mentioned in the story linked above, and it is now its sole survivor: The Restaurant School (now The Restaurant School at Walnut Hill College). It turned out a host of inventive chefs, some of whom set up shop on a forlorn Manayunk business strip called Main Street.

Perrier raised our expectations of what to expect from a top-of-the-line, three-Michelin-star (though I believe Michelin stripped the restaurant of its third star near the end of its life, sending Perrier into a funk) fine dining restaurant. Steve Poses and "the kids" raised the expectations of what to expect from a restaurant for everyone else.

Quote:
Originally Posted by kyb01 View Post
Funny how France awarded the Legion of Honor to Perrier(even though his primary career was in the United States) when it's never occurred to anyone locally to give him the Philadelphia Award something he richly deserves,IMO.
Wanna start a campaign to correct this oversight?


Quote:
Originally Posted by kyb01 View Post
Oh, I'm all for embracing positive change! But soon few will remember Perrier and how he, and a few others back in the late 60s/70s, caused a food revolution in the city. We pretty much take for granted today that Philadelphia is a food and restaurant town. That was not always the case.
A subsequent post suggests this isn't the case, but it's worth repeating the history to keep it fresh in everyone's memory "lest we forget."
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Old 12-13-2015, 01:23 PM
 
Location: The place where the road & the sky collide
23,816 posts, read 34,864,325 times
Reputation: 10258
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarketStEl View Post
The food culture in Philadephia pre-Restaurant Renaissance was pretty much dominated by meat-and-potatoes, dark-wood-paneled restaurants. A couple of others you left out: Frankie Bradley's, with its plank steaks, and Arthur's. (The former is now an eclectic anything-and-everything-goes bar/pub/nightspot that pays homage to its heritage by adopting its original name [for a long time, it was the lesbian bar/restaurant Sisters] with a "y" where the "ie" was in the first name. A Chipotle Mexican Grill location occupies the site of the latter, which had housed the acclaimed high-end Chinese restaurant Susanna Foo for most of the 1990s and early 2000s.) I ate at one such restaurant in the 'burbs with my ex once: the General Wayne Inn in Merion, now a Hasidic Jewish synagogue and cultural center.

The then-food critic for Philadelphia magazine, where I am now a staffer, wrote a wonderful article ca. 1990 about the evolution of Philadelphia's dining scene. He described the restaurant scene pre-1971 as "The Grownups Serve the Mix-and-Match Menu." The two things I remember from his lengthy description of this old (and boring) restaurant universe were his descriptions of the salad dressings: "(bottled) French, Russian (French with pickle bits), Thousand Island (even more pickle bits)," and his description of "some restaurant on some Horse Pike" on the way to the shore where the bartenders poured generously: "Greedy's 1 1/2! Only miles away!"

What that article noted that's not yet metioned here were "the kids" who opened up eclectic restaurants with funky decor and menus that featured whatever the chef felt like preparing that day, usually posted on a blackboard. Three of them opened at about the same time: the Knave of Hearts (300 block South Street), the Astral Plane (1700 block Lombard, in the former office of an African-American newspaper, front pages of which graced the walls of its bar), and Friday Saturday Sunday (20th and Rittenhouse Square, which had a great matchbook bearing a photo of the kitchen staff on the front and the legend "Friday Saturday Sunday loves you every night." on the back and a great, very intimate bar with a fish tank upstairs; I recall having a tear-filled argument with my ex there the night he decided that rather than move to Boston, I should move to Philly. The place grew on me. What else can I say?) Of those three, which along with Steve Poses' restaurants (Frog on the high end and the Commissary on the low end, later joined by City Bites across from the original Ritz where Positano Coast is now), were the defining restaurants of the Restaurant Renaissance, Friday Saturday Sunday lasted the longest, closing only this past summer when the owner sold it to a buyer who said he was willing to keep the name.

The website now simply has these words: "Coming Soon - 2016." I hope the fish tank survives the transition too.

There was a fourth pillar of the Restaurant Renaissance, mentioned in the story linked above, and it is now its sole survivor: The Restaurant School (now The Restaurant School at Walnut Hill College). It turned out a host of inventive chefs, some of whom set up shop on a forlorn Manayunk business strip called Main Street.

Perrier raised our expectations of what to expect from a top-of-the-line, three-Michelin-star (though I believe Michelin stripped the restaurant of its third star near the end of its life, sending Perrier into a funk) fine dining restaurant. Steve Poses and "the kids" raised the expectations of what to expect from a restaurant for everyone else.



Wanna start a campaign to correct this oversight?




A subsequent post suggests this isn't the case, but it's worth repeating the history to keep it fresh in everyone's memory "lest we forget."
Knave of Hearts & Astral Plane were an outgrowth of the boutiques that started on Sansom, interspersed with head shops. As the spaces on Sansom filled & therefore rents went up there was a movement to South St. where rents were still low. Pine St. had the antique shops.

The food critic who you are remembering took over from Elaine Tait. She was moved to lifestyles at some point after that replaced the Society Page.

I think the other fancy restaurant that I can't remember the name of was something like top of the 2s or top of the 3s. It was way out of my price range so the name escapes me.

Last edited by southbound_295; 12-13-2015 at 01:33 PM..
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Old 12-13-2015, 01:48 PM
 
10,787 posts, read 8,827,312 times
Reputation: 3984
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarketStEl View Post
The food culture in Philadephia pre-Restaurant Renaissance was pretty much dominated by meat-and-potatoes, dark-wood-paneled restaurants. A couple of others you left out: Frankie Bradley's, with its plank steaks, and Arthur's. (The former is now an eclectic anything-and-everything-goes bar/pub/nightspot that pays homage to its heritage by adopting its original name [for a long time, it was the lesbian bar/restaurant Sisters] with a "y" where the "ie" was in the first name. A Chipotle Mexican Grill location occupies the site of the latter, which had housed the acclaimed high-end Chinese restaurant Susanna Foo for most of the 1990s and early 2000s.) I ate at one such restaurant in the 'burbs with my ex once: the General Wayne Inn in Merion, now a Hasidic Jewish synagogue and cultural center.

The then-food critic for Philadelphia magazine, where I am now a staffer, wrote a wonderful article ca. 1990 about the evolution of Philadelphia's dining scene. He described the restaurant scene pre-1971 as "The Grownups Serve the Mix-and-Match Menu." The two things I remember from his lengthy description of this old (and boring) restaurant universe were his descriptions of the salad dressings: "(bottled) French, Russian (French with pickle bits), Thousand Island (even more pickle bits)," and his description of "some restaurant on some Horse Pike" on the way to the shore where the bartenders poured generously: "Greedy's 1 1/2! Only miles away!"

What that article noted that's not yet metioned here were "the kids" who opened up eclectic restaurants with funky decor and menus that featured whatever the chef felt like preparing that day, usually posted on a blackboard. Three of them opened at about the same time: the Knave of Hearts (300 block South Street), the Astral Plane (1700 block Lombard, in the former office of an African-American newspaper, front pages of which graced the walls of its bar), and Friday Saturday Sunday (20th and Rittenhouse Square, which had a great matchbook bearing a photo of the kitchen staff on the front and the legend "Friday Saturday Sunday loves you every night." on the back and a great, very intimate bar with a fish tank upstairs; I recall having a tear-filled argument with my ex there the night he decided that rather than move to Boston, I should move to Philly. The place grew on me. What else can I say?) Of those three, which along with Steve Poses' restaurants (Frog on the high end and the Commissary on the low end, later joined by City Bites across from the original Ritz where Positano Coast is now), were the defining restaurants of the Restaurant Renaissance, Friday Saturday Sunday lasted the longest, closing only this past summer when the owner sold it to a buyer who said he was willing to keep the name.

The website now simply has these words: "Coming Soon - 2016." I hope the fish tank survives the transition too.

There was a fourth pillar of the Restaurant Renaissance, mentioned in the story linked above, and it is now its sole survivor: The Restaurant School (now The Restaurant School at Walnut Hill College). It turned out a host of inventive chefs, some of whom set up shop on a forlorn Manayunk business strip called Main Street.

Perrier raised our expectations of what to expect from a top-of-the-line, three-Michelin-star (though I believe Michelin stripped the restaurant of its third star near the end of its life, sending Perrier into a funk) fine dining restaurant. Steve Poses and "the kids" raised the expectations of what to expect from a restaurant for everyone else.



Wanna start a campaign to correct this oversight?




A subsequent post suggests this isn't the case, but it's worth repeating the history to keep it fresh in everyone's memory "lest we forget."
You probably have a much better grasp of how to start that kind of campaign, wrt Perrier, than I do. Another notable restaurant back in the early 70s was London. It was exactly where the current one is. This was back when Fairmount was pretty shabby.
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Old 12-13-2015, 01:50 PM
 
10,787 posts, read 8,827,312 times
Reputation: 3984
Quote:
Originally Posted by southbound_295 View Post
Knave of Hearts & Astral Plane were an outgrowth of the boutiques that started on Sansom, interspersed with head shops. As the spaces on Sansom filled & therefore rents went up there was a movement to South St. where rents were still low. Pine St. had the antique shops.

The food critic who you are remembering took over from Elaine Tait. She was moved to lifestyles at some point after that replaced the Society Page.

I think the other fancy restaurant that I can't remember the name of was something like top of the 2s or top of the 3s. It was way out of my price range so the name escapes me.
There was also the Three Threes and the Garden which were both near 16th and Spruce.
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Old 12-13-2015, 04:09 PM
 
Location: The place where the road & the sky collide
23,816 posts, read 34,864,325 times
Reputation: 10258
Quote:
Originally Posted by kyb01 View Post
There was also the Three Threes and the Garden which were both near 16th and Spruce.
The Three Trees must be the one I'm thinking of. I think the name came from the address - 333. Didn't Tayoun have a middle eastern restaurant with belly dancers? Of course the Latin Casino had moved to Cherry Hill, across Rte 70 from Garden State Racetrack.

Before Knave of Hearts opened on South Street there wasn't much there. The only place that I can remember was the magic shop that sold tarot cards, incense, & candles.
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Old 12-13-2015, 07:50 PM
 
10,787 posts, read 8,827,312 times
Reputation: 3984
Quote:
Originally Posted by southbound_295 View Post
The Three Trees must be the one I'm thinking of. I think the name came from the address - 333. Didn't Tayoun have a middle eastern restaurant with belly dancers? Of course the Latin Casino had moved to Cherry Hill, across Rte 70 from Garden State Racetrack.

Before Knave of Hearts opened on South Street there wasn't much there. The only place that I can remember was the magic shop that sold tarot cards, incense, & candles.
Yeah, lol, Tayoun's place was on the 100 block of Chestnut St.

And, lol, re the Latin Casino! The food was horrible!

Hmmm, the TLA was kinda there on South St and Lickity Split, at 4th and South, came along a bit later.
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Old 12-13-2015, 09:41 PM
 
Location: The place where the road & the sky collide
23,816 posts, read 34,864,325 times
Reputation: 10258
Quote:
Originally Posted by kyb01 View Post
Yeah, lol, Tayoun's place was on the 100 block of Chestnut St.

And, lol, re the Latin Casino! The food was horrible!

Hmmm, the TLA was kinda there on South St and Lickity Split, at 4th and South, came along a bit later.
I never went to the Latin. I heard that the food was god-awful. I remember when Lickety Split opened. That was a real novelty.

Wasn't Krass Brothers on South St.?
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Old 12-14-2015, 05:36 AM
 
10,787 posts, read 8,827,312 times
Reputation: 3984
Quote:
Originally Posted by southbound_295 View Post
I never went to the Latin. I heard that the food was god-awful. I remember when Lickety Split opened. That was a real novelty.

Wasn't Krass Brothers on South St.?
Yes, at 9th and South. There's a Whole Foods that takes up most of that block now.
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Old 12-14-2015, 08:12 AM
 
Location: NYC based - Used to Live in Philly - Transplant from Miami
2,307 posts, read 2,781,820 times
Reputation: 2610
This is a rant.

The Bloomingdales Outlet on Chestnut is a joke.
If anything the selection of Nordstrom rack is a tad better.

1. Aside of outlet-exclusive-only merchandise, there are real deal merchandise but they are from two years ago (that is Spring/Summer collection of 2013 and Fall/Winter of 2012) that had been sold in Burlington Coat Factory on Market East last year.
The only difference is that Burlington in Market East does not really care about their store appearance, while Bloomingdale outlet has the name Bloomingdale attached to it.
2. Alot of the merchandise of the non outlet-exclusive-only are only discounted around 10 - 15% from their original prices 2 years ago.
3. The mens department is a joke.


I take this personally since this could mean that their marketing team does not think highly of Philadelphians.
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