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Old 01-21-2015, 01:30 PM
 
Location: Boston Metrowest (via the Philly area)
7,319 posts, read 10,692,956 times
Reputation: 8909

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Quote:
Originally Posted by asiandudeyo View Post
Thanks.
I am sorry. I did not mean to be a ******. Sometimes it does frustrate me.
Although I have to remind myself for every single negative thing about a city, there are other gazillion positive things about that city.
I think you're being completely fair, too--but at the very least, I think the fact that Philadelphia has a several "proper" high-streets with at least a critical mass of middle-to-higher end stores is a major plus. It definitely has a good base to build on (retailers really look for proximity to other retailers--also keep in mind that Burberry, for example, closed because it seemed to be out-rented by Michael Kors). Few cities have even what Philadelphia has, although I recognize it pales in comparison to some other select cities (e.g., Boston, Miami and San Francisco).

And the Philly region is not lacking for affluence, either--it's just much less concentrated in the city than other major metro areas. King of Prussia being one of the largest luxury trophy malls in the US is a testament to that, but the city can continue to entice suburbanites with a much more unique urban shopping experience.

So long as the city continues to boost its high-paying jobs, attract more affluent residents, and raise its travel profile, it is doing everything right to attract more high-end retail.

Last edited by Duderino; 01-21-2015 at 01:50 PM..
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Old 01-23-2015, 12:14 AM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
14,398 posts, read 9,315,512 times
Reputation: 10715
1. Note that the Conde Nast Traveler ratings are based on a readers' survey. That means the readers of the magazine think shopping in this town is great. I know such surveys are unscientific, but something tells me that the readership of this magazine is not unusually concentrated in Greater Philadelphia. IOW, the shopping we have made a strong impression on people who came here and checked it out.

2. What were the two places that got singled out in the mag's writeup? The Reading Terminal Market and Third Street in Old City, in particular Sugarcube. What do these two places have in common? They're purely homegrown, and light to nonexistent on all the national chains you all have been salivating over in the posts preceding this.

There's NO chain presence in the RTM at all, and it's far and away the most acclaimed and highly regarded place to shop in the city. Granted, it sells food, not clothing, but it still rates as a shopping experience like no other.

I can think of only one Third Street store at present that is non-local in origin: Jonathan Adler, the home decor store, and Jonathan has only a handful of stores around the country. The rest are all homegrown, and many of them specialize in high-end or unique merchandise (any of you checked out Tribal Home?).

I used to get highly annoyed when I traveled with my ex and the first thing he would do in any city we visited was make a bee line for the Polo Ralph Lauren store. What's unique, distinctive or unusual about going there? Well, for what it's worth, the same can be said for all those other chains whose absence some of you lamented. Don't get me wrong, I am thrilled that Uniqlo, Michael Kors, Madewell, American Eagle, and so on, have opened in Center City, and the upgrading of Barneys Co-op says good things too (even though I will in all likelihood never set foot in Barneys just as I never set foot in the misnamed Co-op). But it's the "only in Philly" stuff that caught the visitors' eye. We should be promoting the hell out of that as well.
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Old 01-23-2015, 07:48 AM
 
Location: Boston Metrowest (via the Philly area)
7,319 posts, read 10,692,956 times
Reputation: 8909
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarketStEl View Post
I used to get highly annoyed when I traveled with my ex and the first thing he would do in any city we visited was make a bee line for the Polo Ralph Lauren store. What's unique, distinctive or unusual about going there? Well, for what it's worth, the same can be said for all those other chains whose absence some of you lamented. Don't get me wrong, I am thrilled that Uniqlo, Michael Kors, Madewell, American Eagle, and so on, have opened in Center City, and the upgrading of Barneys Co-op says good things too (even though I will in all likelihood never set foot in Barneys just as I never set foot in the misnamed Co-op). But it's the "only in Philly" stuff that caught the visitors' eye. We should be promoting the hell out of that as well.
Well said. In an era of sameness and never-ending "corporatization," locally-owned businesses are indeed crucial to any successful and interesting city.
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Old 01-23-2015, 11:05 AM
 
Location: The place where the road & the sky collide
23,816 posts, read 34,864,325 times
Reputation: 10258
Quote:
Originally Posted by Duderino View Post
Well said. In an era of sameness and never-ending "corporatization," locally-owned businesses are indeed crucial to any successful and interesting city.
This^^^

I remember 4 local department stores in Center City. Each one specialized in certain things. The May company killed the last 2. When they bought Wanamakers & turned it into a Hecht, with the buyers in Baltimore, they ran a huge ad campaign announcing "Philadelphia, we're going to teach you how to shop." No they didn't.
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Old 01-23-2015, 07:19 PM
 
Location: back in Philadelphia!
3,266 posts, read 5,676,291 times
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and then May itself got bought a few years later.
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Old 01-24-2015, 12:49 AM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
14,398 posts, read 9,315,512 times
Reputation: 10715
Funny, I don't remember "we're going to teach you how to shop" - were I in Hecht's marketing department, I would have nixed that line as an insult to the customers - but I do remember ads in the subway that had lines reminiscent of that old sign atop Lits: "A great city. A great store. A new name." (Or something like that for the last line.)

Philadelphians displayed their traditional disdain for outsiders coming in and rebadging old familiar institiutions. When May Department Stores acquired Wanamakers' rival at the other end of Market East, it kept the Strawbridge name on the stores even though the chain was also folded into Hecht's administratively.
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Old 01-24-2015, 03:07 AM
 
Location: The place where the road & the sky collide
23,816 posts, read 34,864,325 times
Reputation: 10258
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarketStEl View Post
Funny, I don't remember "we're going to teach you how to shop" - were I in Hecht's marketing department, I would have nixed that line as an insult to the customers - but I do remember ads in the subway that had lines reminiscent of that old sign atop Lits: "A great city. A great store. A new name." (Or something like that for the last line.)

Philadelphians displayed their traditional disdain for outsiders coming in and rebadging old familiar institiutions. When May Department Stores acquired Wanamakers' rival at the other end of Market East, it kept the Strawbridge name on the stores even though the chain was also folded into Hecht's administratively.
I thought that it was extremely insulting & so did everyone who I knew, of all ages. I paid no attention to the rest of the ad campaign. That one line was all I needed to know about the May Company. That & their ignorance of John Wanamaker's place in history.

The Philadelphia department stores always included items that were in small enough quantities that everyone couldn't buy one. Whatever your financial status, you could buy something special. I remember the first Christmas as Hechts there were giant piles of sort of ratty-looking little teddy bears in the Christmas department. I thought "This is not going to go over well." After Christmas most of those teddys were half price, then lower & lower. I don't know if they donated them or sent them back to Baltimore.
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Old 01-24-2015, 08:15 AM
 
10,787 posts, read 8,827,312 times
Reputation: 3984
Quote:
Originally Posted by southbound_295 View Post
I thought that it was extremely insulting & so did everyone who I knew, of all ages. I paid no attention to the rest of the ad campaign. That one line was all I needed to know about the May Company. That & their ignorance of John Wanamaker's place in history.

The Philadelphia department stores always included items that were in small enough quantities that everyone couldn't buy one. Whatever your financial status, you could buy something special. I remember the first Christmas as Hechts there were giant piles of sort of ratty-looking little teddy bears in the Christmas department. I thought "This is not going to go over well." After Christmas most of those teddys were half price, then lower & lower. I don't know if they donated them or sent them back to Baltimore.
On top of that was the Lord and Taylor's debacle. They essentially let the retail portion of the building lay fallow and deteriorate the whole while they were there. It took a WHILE for Macy's to clean up the mess they left.
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Old 01-24-2015, 11:54 AM
 
Location: The place where the road & the sky collide
23,816 posts, read 34,864,325 times
Reputation: 10258
Quote:
Originally Posted by kyb01 View Post
On top of that was the Lord and Taylor's debacle. They essentially let the retail portion of the building lay fallow and deteriorate the whole while they were there. It took a WHILE for Macy's to clean up the mess they left.
I hated that Philadelphia lost the local department stores. If I ever win the lottery I would love to start a new one, based on the way that the old ones operated. It's not a matter of how many designer stores are in the city. Philadelphia had none, years ago. Philadelphia had stores that catered to the local population. They knew what the locals wanted. The May Company failed miserably.

The May Company didn't understand that history is a big part of the city, despite the preservation in the city. Apparently, they also didn't care that department stores came to be in the US because of John Wanamaker & Marshal Field.
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Old 01-25-2015, 05:13 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia, PA
8,701 posts, read 14,772,056 times
Reputation: 3669
Looks like Coach on Walnut has closed. And Kenneth Cole is closing as well. Philadelphia's retail scene continues to take one step forward and one step back.
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