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Old 01-26-2015, 09:47 PM
 
Location: NYC based - Used to Live in Philly - Transplant from Miami
2,307 posts, read 2,781,820 times
Reputation: 2610

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The Rumor Mill: Zara on Walnut Street Is Closing For a Very, Very Long Time - Shoppist

OH great. Now this really hits home....I really take this one personally LOL

Last edited by asiandudeyo; 01-26-2015 at 09:59 PM..
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Old 01-26-2015, 10:55 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia, PA
8,701 posts, read 14,772,056 times
Reputation: 3669
Quote:
Originally Posted by asiandudeyo View Post
The Rumor Mill: Zara on Walnut Street Is Closing For a Very, Very Long Time - Shoppist

OH great. Now this really hits home....I really take this one personally LOL
Well good thing it's just for renovations and not permanent.
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Old 01-26-2015, 11:29 PM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
14,395 posts, read 9,315,512 times
Reputation: 10712
Quote:
Originally Posted by asiandudeyo View Post
First of all, I agree that having a city with all the name brands are monotonous. Something "locally-grown" is also needed to add diversity and characters to the city.
I am going to talk mainly about fashion, but also furnitures per what you mentioned.
Most of the name-brands I and several others were mentioning are NOT ubiquity in every cities. Their boutiques / stores are only available in selected cities, where the corporation know that people will actually get them.
In my personal opinion, world-class cities are those whivch actually have these selections provided.
And as somebody who have lived in Philadelphia for 4 years, I would like to see this city to grow even more by providing this selections. (And of course it will make my life easier when I shop for the clients instead of going home to Miami or Manhattan to shop he he).
Only selective cities have Desigual, Scotch & Soda, SuperDry, Paul Smith and Ted Baker.
So they are distinctive. But they are internationally renowned.
They are not as "common-chain" as Polo Ralph Lauren. Although now we have Ted Baker in KOP.
In my dream, people can come to Philadelphia to shop not only for locale boutiques (which is 90% misnomer, I will explain later below) but also world-class renowned brands. Back home in Miami, people flocked Dsquared2 and Jimmy Choo boutiques all the way from Dallas because they don;t have those particular stores there. True, Saks Fifth carries them, but the fully-fledged boutique is always the real deal since it has all the selections from the label.
Not all cities have Kartell store. It is an international yet unique Italian-designed furniture stores I remember when one of my client asked me that he wanted to get those unique indie chairs form the office setting in Ugly Betty. And right away I know that they are of Kartell. They are unique, they are not overrated.
The point is that I have seen people come from Bucks County to Center City to shop in Jack Wills of Walnut (another internationally renowned label) because it is unique and it is not available in Montgomery Mall or Plymouth meeting Mall. Why not adding others?


Now about locale boutique, they usually sell other brands that are not local. The only brand/boutique I know was born and grown in Philly is Duke and Winston on Chestnut. (You should check it out especially since the pup is cute).
Sugarcube perhaps is locally owned but it only sells 10% Phialdelphia-based products. They provide selection from "fresh" designers from all over the country and internationally who wants to make it big. Michelle Kim is one of an example of products carried by SugarCube. The last time I checked, she is not from Philly. So technically, Sugarcube is just an outlet that sell cheaper merchandises as oppose to Joan Shepp and Boyd. You can buy Michelle Kim's merchandise, as well as some others such as Gentle Fawns (Canadian brands) in numerous store in Brooklyn, West Hollywood and South Beach. So they are not unique to Philadelphia.
This also applies to furniture store.

And also not all international-renowned brand offer same products in every stores they have. It will depend on the demand of the demographic in the area. For example, Ralph Lauren in Bellevue does not have certain lines of RL products; such as: the purple label, the RLX and Denim & Supply. Another good example is Lacoste of CC. It does not provide extensive Live! line since there is no demand for it here. (The store only started to offer the line last year; albeit in limited selection and quantity). Of course this does not apply to affordable fast-fashion brands like H & M, Uniqlo and soon F21. Although even then, H & M chestnut and walnut actually offer slightly different selections. (Chestnut being for the younger crowds while Walnut being for the older crowds).

I apologize if I sounded condescending in my previous post in regard to Conde Nast article. But I am not the only one, who share the sentiment about the reality of shopping here. Some of my friends also said the same thing. There are also other who feel the same way. Read the article below.
Mirror, Mirror: Welcome to Philadelphia, city of shopping
I can see Philadelphia rated #2 heck even #1 for its culinary selection in the US. But I don't see how Philadelphia can be #2 for world shopping destination beating Hong Kong, Dubai or Paris. Heck I even think that Bangkok and Bandung have more indie stores that makes and sells one-of-a-kind local products, while also providing internationally recognized brands within its vicinity.


Anyway at the end, we all have our opinions. And tihis is just my 2 cents.

OK you guys stay warm today and tomorrow!!!!!! Don't drive when it is not necessary.
Check, gotcha. And gotcha on the nature of some of the designer boutiques you mention.

I don't consider it a mark against a local boutique that much of the merchandise it carries (or even all of it) is not local - especially if what it does carry can't be found easily elsewhere in the area or city. I used to regularly go to two locally owned casual menswear shops in Rehoboth Beach to seek out Mix Studio, a line that I haven't run across anywhere else since the two stores that carried it closed.

Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams have become a high-end chain furniture boutique. They used to have a store on Chestnut Street, but sold it to its current owners, who still carry their line but have added several others. Yet I'd consider Luxe Home local, even though, unlike at Cella Luxuria one block down, it carries products from no local makers I know of (I know the fellow who produces some of the more original tables I've seen at Cella Luxuria, a really great furniture boutique whose owners I know as well).

I remember passing by Duke & Winston's original store on 2nd Street in Northern Liberties and seeing their merchandise at a First Friday special event at the Arden Theatre Company. I'm pleased they've grown and moved to a more highly visible location.

But if you want further proof that perhaps the readers of Conde Nast Traveler march to the beat of a different drummer, given what you've just said above about world shopping destinations, consider that the mag's readers put Barcelona in the top spot. Barcelona, from what I hear, is a truly fascinating city, but I hadn't associated it with fashion shopping either. (I'd sure like to ride its subway someday as well as take a stroll down Las Ramblas and check out the Antonio Gaudi buildings.)

Hope you're staying warm too.
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Old 01-27-2015, 12:57 AM
 
Location: The place where the road & the sky collide
23,816 posts, read 34,864,325 times
Reputation: 10258
Quote:
Originally Posted by asiandudeyo View Post
First of all, I agree that having a city with all the name brands are monotonous. Something "locally-grown" is also needed to add diversity and characters to the city.
I am going to talk mainly about fashion, but also furnitures per what you mentioned.
Most of the name-brands I and several others were mentioning are NOT ubiquity in every cities. Their boutiques / stores are only available in selected cities, where the corporation know that people will actually get them.
In my personal opinion, world-class cities are those whivch actually have these selections provided.
And as somebody who have lived in Philadelphia for 4 years, I would like to see this city to grow even more by providing this selections. (And of course it will make my life easier when I shop for the clients instead of going home to Miami or Manhattan to shop he he).
Only selective cities have Desigual, Scotch & Soda, SuperDry, Paul Smith and Ted Baker.
So they are distinctive. But they are internationally renowned.
They are not as "common-chain" as Polo Ralph Lauren. Although now we have Ted Baker in KOP.
In my dream, people can come to Philadelphia to shop not only for locale boutiques (which is 90% misnomer, I will explain later below) but also world-class renowned brands. Back home in Miami, people flocked Dsquared2 and Jimmy Choo boutiques all the way from Dallas because they don;t have those particular stores there. True, Saks Fifth carries them, but the fully-fledged boutique is always the real deal since it has all the selections from the label.
Not all cities have Kartell store. It is an international yet unique Italian-designed furniture stores I remember when one of my client asked me that he wanted to get those unique indie chairs form the office setting in Ugly Betty. And right away I know that they are of Kartell. They are unique, they are not overrated.
The point is that I have seen people come from Bucks County to Center City to shop in Jack Wills of Walnut (another internationally renowned label) because it is unique and it is not available in Montgomery Mall or Plymouth meeting Mall. Why not adding others?


Now about locale boutique, they usually sell other brands that are not local. The only brand/boutique I know was born and grown in Philly is Duke and Winston on Chestnut. (You should check it out especially since the pup is cute).
Sugarcube perhaps is locally owned but it only sells 10% Phialdelphia-based products. They provide selection from "fresh" designers from all over the country and internationally who wants to make it big. Michelle Kim is one of an example of products carried by SugarCube. The last time I checked, she is not from Philly. So technically, Sugarcube is just an outlet that sell cheaper merchandises as oppose to Joan Shepp and Boyd. You can buy Michelle Kim's merchandise, as well as some others such as Gentle Fawns (Canadian brands) in numerous store in Brooklyn, West Hollywood and South Beach. So they are not unique to Philadelphia.
This also applies to furniture store.

And also not all international-renowned brand offer same products in every stores they have. It will depend on the demand of the demographic in the area. For example, Ralph Lauren in Bellevue does not have certain lines of RL products; such as: the purple label, the RLX and Denim & Supply. Another good example is Lacoste of CC. It does not provide extensive Live! line since there is no demand for it here. (The store only started to offer the line last year; albeit in limited selection and quantity). Of course this does not apply to affordable fast-fashion brands like H & M, Uniqlo and soon F21. Although even then, H & M chestnut and walnut actually offer slightly different selections. (Chestnut being for the younger crowds while Walnut being for the older crowds).

I apologize if I sounded condescending in my previous post in regard to Conde Nast article. But I am not the only one, who share the sentiment about the reality of shopping here. Some of my friends also said the same thing. There are also other who feel the same way. Read the article below.
Mirror, Mirror: Welcome to Philadelphia, city of shopping
I can see Philadelphia rated #2 heck even #1 for its culinary selection in the US. But I don't see how Philadelphia can be #2 for world shopping destination beating Hong Kong, Dubai or Paris. Heck I even think that Bangkok and Bandung have more indie stores that makes and sells one-of-a-kind local products, while also providing internationally recognized brands within its vicinity.


Anyway at the end, we all have our opinions. And tihis is just my 2 cents.

OK you guys stay warm today and tomorrow!!!!!! Don't drive when it is not necessary.
You're welcome to your opinion, but, really, shops don't make a city. People make a city.

Philadelphia has never had a reputation for being on the cutting edge of fashion. What made you choose to move to Philadelphia?
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Old 01-27-2015, 05:53 AM
 
Location: New York City
9,448 posts, read 9,471,166 times
Reputation: 6687
Quote:
Originally Posted by asiandudeyo View Post
First of all, I agree that having a city with all the name brands are monotonous. Something "locally-grown" is also needed to add diversity and characters to the city.
I am going to talk mainly about fashion, but also furnitures per what you mentioned.
Most of the name-brands I and several others were mentioning are NOT ubiquity in every cities. Their boutiques / stores are only available in selected cities, where the corporation know that people will actually get them.
In my personal opinion, world-class cities are those whivch actually have these selections provided.
And as somebody who have lived in Philadelphia for 4 years, I would like to see this city to grow even more by providing this selections. (And of course it will make my life easier when I shop for the clients instead of going home to Miami or Manhattan to shop he he).
Only selective cities have Desigual, Scotch & Soda, SuperDry, Paul Smith and Ted Baker.
So they are distinctive. But they are internationally renowned.
They are not as "common-chain" as Polo Ralph Lauren. Although now we have Ted Baker in KOP.
In my dream, people can come to Philadelphia to shop not only for locale boutiques (which is 90% misnomer, I will explain later below) but also world-class renowned brands. Back home in Miami, people flocked Dsquared2 and Jimmy Choo boutiques all the way from Dallas because they don;t have those particular stores there. True, Saks Fifth carries them, but the fully-fledged boutique is always the real deal since it has all the selections from the label.
Not all cities have Kartell store. It is an international yet unique Italian-designed furniture stores I remember when one of my client asked me that he wanted to get those unique indie chairs form the office setting in Ugly Betty. And right away I know that they are of Kartell. They are unique, they are not overrated.
The point is that I have seen people come from Bucks County to Center City to shop in Jack Wills of Walnut (another internationally renowned label) because it is unique and it is not available in Montgomery Mall or Plymouth meeting Mall. Why not adding others?


Now about locale boutique, they usually sell other brands that are not local. The only brand/boutique I know was born and grown in Philly is Duke and Winston on Chestnut. (You should check it out especially since the pup is cute).
Sugarcube perhaps is locally owned but it only sells 10% Phialdelphia-based products. They provide selection from "fresh" designers from all over the country and internationally who wants to make it big. Michelle Kim is one of an example of products carried by SugarCube. The last time I checked, she is not from Philly. So technically, Sugarcube is just an outlet that sell cheaper merchandises as oppose to Joan Shepp and Boyd. You can buy Michelle Kim's merchandise, as well as some others such as Gentle Fawns (Canadian brands) in numerous store in Brooklyn, West Hollywood and South Beach. So they are not unique to Philadelphia.
This also applies to furniture store.

And also not all international-renowned brand offer same products in every stores they have. It will depend on the demand of the demographic in the area. For example, Ralph Lauren in Bellevue does not have certain lines of RL products; such as: the purple label, the RLX and Denim & Supply. Another good example is Lacoste of CC. It does not provide extensive Live! line since there is no demand for it here. (The store only started to offer the line last year; albeit in limited selection and quantity). Of course this does not apply to affordable fast-fashion brands like H & M, Uniqlo and soon F21. Although even then, H & M chestnut and walnut actually offer slightly different selections. (Chestnut being for the younger crowds while Walnut being for the older crowds).

I apologize if I sounded condescending in my previous post in regard to Conde Nast article. But I am not the only one, who share the sentiment about the reality of shopping here. Some of my friends also said the same thing. There are also other who feel the same way. Read the article below.
Mirror, Mirror: Welcome to Philadelphia, city of shopping
I can see Philadelphia rated #2 heck even #1 for its culinary selection in the US. But I don't see how Philadelphia can be #2 for world shopping destination beating Hong Kong, Dubai or Paris. Heck I even think that Bangkok and Bandung have more indie stores that makes and sells one-of-a-kind local products, while also providing internationally recognized brands within its vicinity.


Anyway at the end, we all have our opinions. And tihis is just my 2 cents.

OK you guys stay warm today and tomorrow!!!!!! Don't drive when it is not necessary.

Some of these points are valid, but Philly is years behind New York, PAis, San Fran, etc in the shopping world.

Also if this area is going to get a Jimmy Choo or Chanel boutique it is going to be in KoP, not in Center City. These labels follow the wealth and the sophisticated shopper, which in Phillys case is primarily in the suburbs. Our area is certainly recognized by international retails such as Saint Laurent, LV, Neimans and soon to come Prada, but the draw is to KoP, not Walnut St.
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Old 01-27-2015, 06:22 AM
 
5,546 posts, read 6,912,438 times
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While I respect those who are really into high fashion on this board, I have a hard time caring when a store like Coach closes. The interesting part of the city are the original boutiques IMO. I don't want Philly to be seen as a shopping destination like NYC and SF, populated with stores carrying $2000 wallets and the same name brands you can get in any other big city. And I get that there are economic positives that come from that on the whole, but there's more to a retail scene than Burberry and Tiffany's...I mean, how many people here are frequenting these stores to buy the latest $700 belt?
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Old 01-27-2015, 08:35 AM
 
Location: New York City
9,448 posts, read 9,471,166 times
Reputation: 6687
Quote:
Originally Posted by AJNEOA View Post
While I respect those who are really into high fashion on this board, I have a hard time caring when a store like Coach closes. The interesting part of the city are the original boutiques IMO. I don't want Philly to be seen as a shopping destination like NYC and SF, populated with stores carrying $2000 wallets and the same name brands you can get in any other big city. And I get that there are economic positives that come from that on the whole, but there's more to a retail scene than Burberry and Tiffany's...I mean, how many people here are frequenting these stores to buy the latest $700 belt?
Yes, but Scotch and Soda, Penguin, TopShop, Ted Baker, Fred Perry, Paul Smith, etc are not stores you find in any old shopping mall or city. It would be great if more boutiques in Philly carried a selection of these brands, but an actual outpost would be awesome.

Everyone knows Louis Vuitton, but having stores like the ones I mentioned, plus a mix of independents.. now that is a strong selection of retail.

Plus people on here itch and moan that they don't want Philly to have a scene like NYC, NYC has hundreds of boutique/independent shops everywhere! Take a walk around the village/Chelsea, SoHo, you have all the top name brands, plus so many interesting independents ranging from scarves to coats to skincare. Philly has some wonderful options as well, but nowhere near what NYC/Boston/LA/Chicago have.

We live in a wonderful city, but lets not inflate reality.
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Old 01-27-2015, 09:06 AM
 
5,546 posts, read 6,912,438 times
Reputation: 3826
Quote:
Originally Posted by cpomp View Post
Yes, but Scotch and Soda, Penguin, TopShop, Ted Baker, Fred Perry, Paul Smith, etc are not stores you find in any old shopping mall or city. It would be great if more boutiques in Philly carried a selection of these brands, but an actual outpost would be awesome.

Everyone knows Louis Vuitton, but having stores like the ones I mentioned, plus a mix of independents.. now that is a strong selection of retail.

Plus people on here itch and moan that they don't want Philly to have a scene like NYC, NYC has hundreds of boutique/independent shops everywhere! Take a walk around the village/Chelsea, SoHo, you have all the top name brands, plus so many interesting independents ranging from scarves to coats to skincare. Philly has some wonderful options as well, but nowhere near what NYC/Boston/LA/Chicago have.
Yes, I'm not trying to say NYC ONLY offers the big brand names. It just seems so many folks in this forum focus on them, that's all.

Quote:
Originally Posted by cpomp View Post
We live in a wonderful city, but lets not inflate reality.
Inflate reality??? I didn't say I think Philly's offerings are better than the other two cities, I just said:

Quote:
I don't want Philly to be seen as a shopping destination like NYC and SF, populated with stores carrying $2000 wallets and the same name brands you can get in any other big city. And I get that there are economic positives that come from that on the whole, but there's more to a retail scene than Burberry and Tiffany's...I mean, how many people here are frequenting these stores to buy the latest $700 belt?
A wide diversity of options at all price points and a couple less EXPENSIVE brand name stores isn't hurting Philly's scene. That's all.
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Old 01-27-2015, 09:49 AM
 
Location: Boston Metrowest (via the Philly area)
7,319 posts, read 10,692,956 times
Reputation: 8909
Quote:
Originally Posted by AJNEOA View Post
A wide diversity of options at all price points and a couple less EXPENSIVE brand name stores isn't hurting Philly's scene. That's all.
Exactly. Also, despite what San Franciscans and New Yorkers will claim, a significant portion of their retail market is to there to serve wealthy international visitors. Certainly these cities themselves have lots of wealth, but to the extent that more "global" cities have higher end retail options, they're obviously catering to a much more touristy audience (frankly, for the world's 1%).

Philadelphia is definitely gaining ground in attracting more tourists (and presumably many of them are here to shop), but Philly's tourist market still a drop in the bucket compared to NYC. Furthermore, being relatively close to the NYC market, there's a bit of a challenge for Philly in terms of retail market overlap--something that cities like Miami, San Francisco, Chicago, and Boston do not have to contend with.
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Old 01-27-2015, 11:30 AM
 
Location: NYC based - Used to Live in Philly - Transplant from Miami
2,307 posts, read 2,781,820 times
Reputation: 2610
Quote:
Originally Posted by southbound_295 View Post
You're welcome to your opinion, but, really, shops don't make a city. People make a city.

Philadelphia has never had a reputation for being on the cutting edge of fashion. What made you choose to move to Philadelphia?
First of all, thanks for being respectful in your respond. This is one thing that I found very appealing with people in Philly. But again I might be bias.
Anyway you are correct. the people makes the city. Like what I just mentioned, based on my experience people in Philadelphia is friendly and down to earth. And I really enjoy that!
(Although some (not that many though) of them have superiority complex without any "ground base" )
However as I start to love the area, I also want the best for the city. And from my perspective and some transplants here, best meaning availability of vast array of shopping options. Maybe it is a Miamian things, ha ha, but shopping is considered to be a second sport down there.

I moved to Center City from Miami because of my long distance relationship with my boyfriend of nth year.
He works in a firm in Manhattan so I tried to find a way to be closer to him. (He tried to transfer from NYC to Miami to no avail for 2 years). I transferred to the HQ we have here in PA burb (my full-time job) and relocated to Center City.
Travelling between the two cities have been a norm.
But that is another story!
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