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Old 01-11-2018, 12:45 PM
 
Location: NYC & Media PA
505 posts, read 327,189 times
Reputation: 383

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My apartment was in Queens. I actually felt that Queens and Brooklyn were safer than Manhattan. NYC really turned around (again) under Rudy and the momentum just hasn't stopped. Liberals and conservatives both love the secure feeling you get pretty much anywhere. Philly doesn't have a strong presence and the politicians elected here will never push for the proactive policing that turned NYC; theyre too scared of losing their voting base


Quote:
Originally Posted by cpomp View Post
There is a huge difference between being poor and being a thug, i don't care how much money someone has. People are free to move and act how they please, but even when I was on Walnut over the holidays I came across more rowdiness, swearing and pants below the butt in one day then I see in a week walking around a comparable neighborhood in NYC, and its not a shot at Philadelphia (I still see the same stuff in Manhattan, just a lot less).

So while you may not agree with Ipranger467, those sentiments are felt by many, and a lot of the cities problems can be fixed within a few years if we didn't have a one step forward two steps back approach to every issue.

To clarify I wasn't talking about the outer boroughs of NYC, I was directly comparing the Center City area to Manhattan.

I have explored every borough now a good bit except Staten Island, I am not afraid to travel around and explore areas whether they are good or bad, I just make a lot of mental notes when I travel to new cities, neighborhoods, boroughs, etc.
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Old 01-11-2018, 01:28 PM
 
10,789 posts, read 6,849,216 times
Reputation: 3937
Quote:
Originally Posted by lpranger467 View Post
My apartment was in Queens. I actually felt that Queens and Brooklyn were safer than Manhattan. NYC really turned around (again) under Rudy and the momentum just hasn't stopped. Liberals and conservatives both love the secure feeling you get pretty much anywhere. Philly doesn't have a strong presence and the politicians elected here will never push for the proactive policing that turned NYC; theyre too scared of losing their voting base
William Bratton popularized the "broken windows" method of policing and Guiliani was wise enough to hire him as nypd police commissioner. It worked. So Bratton should get the credit. Most New Yorkers have probably never heard of him today.

Are you unaware that Charles Ramsey, Nutter's police commish, applied the same kinds of policing actions here? It worked here too. Except for the infuriating uptick of homicides in 2017, other crimes have continued to go down.
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Old 03-16-2018, 07:53 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia
922 posts, read 438,095 times
Reputation: 748
Nice work, Philly.

After months of trailing the sharp rise of homicides of 2017, we've now killed more than last year at this point - up 6%.

What the hell. So many freaking guns out there.
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Old 03-16-2018, 08:08 AM
 
6,384 posts, read 3,783,650 times
Reputation: 4561
Quote:
Originally Posted by Redddog View Post
Nice work, Philly.

After months of trailing the sharp rise of homicides of 2017, we've now killed more than last year at this point - up 6%.

What the hell. So many freaking guns out there.
‘We’ve killed’? No, I don’t think it’s us ha.

Gun violence is horrendous. But it also disportionally effects certain people who live that life.

If anyone is curious crime in Philadelphia so far in 2018 as of last week



The murder rate is possibly the worst metric to go off of due to the fact that there are tons of factors including where someone was wounded, how fast paramedics get there, the type of weapon, etc.
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Old 03-16-2018, 08:48 AM
 
Location: New York City
7,450 posts, read 6,558,966 times
Reputation: 4437
How does Philadelphia stats compare to Chicago?
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Old 03-21-2018, 06:50 AM
 
Location: New York City
7,450 posts, read 6,558,966 times
Reputation: 4437
1. St. Louis: 12.2 per 100K people
2. New Orleans: 11.24 per 100K people
3. Baltimore: 8.3 per 100K people
4. Kansas City: 6.85 per 100K people
5. Cincinnati: 6.02 per 100K people
6. Pittsburgh: 5.93 per 100K people
7. Memphis: 5.67 per 100K people
8. Cleveland: 5.44 per 100K people
9. Detroit: 4.9 per 100K people
10. Newark: 4.61 per 100K people
11. Oakland: 4.13 per 100K people
12. Philadelphia: 4.08 per 100K people
13. Atlanta: 3.81 per 100K people
14. Chicago: 3.77 per 100K people
15. Bakersfield: 3.72 per 100K people
16. Orlando: 3.61 per 100K people
17. Albuquerque: 3.58 per 100K people
18. DC: 3.52 per 100K people
19. Nashville Metro: 3.44 per 100K people
20. Milwaukee: 3.19 per 100K people
21. Indianapolis: 3.16 per 100K people
22. Louisville Metro: 3.07 per 100K people
23. Denver: 3.03 per 100K people
24. Anchorage: 3.01 per 100K people
25. Jacksonville: 2.95 per 100K people
26. Minneapolis: 2.9 per 100K people
27. Columbus: 2.79 per 100K people
28. Tucson: 2.45 per 100K people
29. Las Vegas Metro: 2.39 per 100K people
30. Oklahoma City: 2.35 per 100K people
31. Toledo: 2.15 per 100K people
32. Dallas: 2.12 per 100K people
33. Wichita: 2.05 per 100K people
34. Miami: 1.98 per 100K people
35. Houston: 1.95 per 100K people
36. Tampa: 1.86 per 100K people
37. Phoenix: 1.8 per 100K people
38. Tulsa: 1.74 per 100K people
39. Boston: 1.49 per 100K people
40. San Antonio: 1.41 per 100K people
41. Los Angeles: 1.36 per 100K people
42. St. Paul, MN: 1.31 per 100K people
43. Stockton: 1.3 per 100K people
44. Charlotte: 1.19 per 100K people
45. Buffalo: 1.19 per 100K people
46. El Paso: 1.17 per 100K people
47. Fort Worth: 1.17 per 100K people
48. Austin: 1.16 per 100K people
49. St. Petersburg: 1.15 per 100K people
50. Jersey City: 1.14 per 100K people
51. San Francisco: 1.03 per 100K people
52. Portland: 0.94 per 100K people
53. Seattle: 0.85 per 100K people
54. San Jose: 0.68 per 100K people
55. San Diego: 0.64 per 100K people
56. NYC: 0.59 per 100K people

I know murder rates are not the best metric to measure crime, BUT this is the metric that everyone notices. And with that, Philadelphia now has the nations largest per capita murder rate among Americas top 10 cities.

How do we fix this problem? Someone posted in the Homicide thread regarding NYC stating: "Gentrification, cameras everywhere, cops all over the place in NYC. NYC cops have the city on lockdown"

If having cops carrying assault rifles on every street corner is what it takes, then I am all for it. I hardly ever see police even in the best parts of Center City, resulting in incidences like flash mobs, stabbings, copper railings being stolen, etc. You do not see that in Manhattan, and I don't need a flashback to 1970 when Manhattan was dangerous, I am talking about 2018 with cities going opposite directions when it comes to safety and policing.

Any other suggestions how to fix this problem?
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Old 03-21-2018, 02:19 PM
 
Location: Denver, CO
31,776 posts, read 14,048,095 times
Reputation: 23351
Quote:
Originally Posted by thedirtypirate View Post
‘We’ve killed’? No, I don’t think it’s us ha.

Gun violence is horrendous. But it also disportionally effects certain people who live that life.
Guns don't commit violence by themselves. It is people violence using a gun as the tool.

Quote:
The murder rate is possibly the worst metric to go off of due to the fact that there are tons of factors including where someone was wounded, how fast paramedics get there, the type of weapon, etc.
Why does type of weapon matter? Dead, is dead, no matter if it is a knife, hammer, club, fists, motor vehicle, bomb, or gun.
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Old 03-21-2018, 02:36 PM
 
10,789 posts, read 6,849,216 times
Reputation: 3937
Quote:
Originally Posted by cpomp View Post




Any other suggestions how to fix this problem?
I was struck by how high Pittsburgh is.

Anyhow...

I said it a long time ago: convince Charles Ramsey to come out of retirement and pay him a LOT to do so. The other option is to appoint a commish who is not part of PPD. Every time someone from outside comes here they shake things up and results happen.

It's crazy because other crimes are going down.

And as you know there is a correlation between crime and poverty. And since Philly is the poorest top ten city, that's probably a factor.
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Old 03-21-2018, 03:43 PM
 
10,789 posts, read 6,849,216 times
Reputation: 3937
Some of these homicides are beyond ridiculous in how they happen: feuds and fights of family members with strangers who have insulted them or some other idiocy. Sigh.

One that made the news over the last couple of days concerned a Penn State student due to graduate in May. This young woman seemed to be on the right path but instead she chose to spend time in a dive bar near 52nd and Market. Some argument ensued, her father and grandfather showed up, it escalated and she was killed. Her father and grandfather were also shot(not life threatening). Basically everything about it was dumb.
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Old 03-21-2018, 07:54 PM
 
Location: New York, NY
1,679 posts, read 992,825 times
Reputation: 2680
Quote:
Originally Posted by kyb01 View Post
Some of these homicides are beyond ridiculous in how they happen: feuds and fights of family members with strangers who have insulted them or some other idiocy. Sigh.

One that made the news over the last couple of days concerned a Penn State student due to graduate in May. This young woman seemed to be on the right path but instead she chose to spend time in a dive bar near 52nd and Market. Some argument ensued, her father and grandfather showed up, it escalated and she was killed. Her father and grandfather were also shot(not life threatening). Basically everything about it was dumb.
Unfortunately poverty and "old school" mentality teaches people to solve petty disputes through violence. Since this America, that way too often involves guns. It happens in the trailer parks of my quiet little hometown, and it happens in the ghettos here. The good thing is, if you aren't involved in drugs or gangs, murder is a very rare chance you don't really have to worry about. Most murders are scumbags killing other scumbags. The truly sad ones are when the innocent people of a violent neighborhood get caught in the crossfire, or ones like this where a promising young person is gunned down for absolutely zero reason.
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