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Old 07-26-2013, 06:14 AM
 
416 posts, read 486,411 times
Reputation: 438

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Clark Park View Post
Part of the charm of famous neighborhoods like Boston's Beacon Hill, Washington's Georgetown, Brooklyn's Park Slope, Cleveland's Ohio City, Baltimore's Federal Hill are adherence to zoning codes that have preserved those historic residential neighborhoods ... and yes, these are in big urban cities.
That is also why most of those neighborhoods you mentioned are incredibly expensive, well beyond the reach of the average middle-class family or college-educated young adult. Zoning laws are why San Francisco, New York, and Boston are among the most expensive cities in the country. They present a formidable challenge to developers' efforts to meet demand for more housing. And building up in the form of high-rises like the one depicted is the best way to meet demand because it allows developers to accommodate lots of people without producing sprawl.

Lack of available housing drives prices up in a growing city. Philly is growing and unless more housing gets built it will become just as expensive as other east coast cities. That would be a shame, since it is perhaps the only city in the region where middle and working class people can still afford to live in large numbers. For regular people who want to live in an urban environment, Philly represents a viable alternative to Boston, D.C., New York, and the cities of the Sun Belt. By being overly protective of old buildings and neighborhoods preservationists will simply destroy the true source of the city's character.
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Old 07-26-2013, 07:50 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia, PA
1,567 posts, read 2,663,137 times
Reputation: 1658
I live in Spruce Hill too. I'm in favor of the development, including the height and mass. I agree with others though that the aesthetics could be improved, particularly as it fronts Baltimore. No blank walls. No pointless, litter-collecting lawnlets.
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Old 07-26-2013, 07:57 AM
 
Location: Philly
10,026 posts, read 14,474,108 times
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its a great place for a large apartment tower. its a short walk from the trolley portal and in an area experiencing a housing shortage
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Old 07-26-2013, 08:12 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia, PA
2,377 posts, read 2,695,391 times
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I know the parks there are beautiful and lively so I can only imagine this would be a great addition to the area despite being out of style. Also to me it seems important to help improve west philly as a whole.
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Old 07-26-2013, 08:43 AM
 
1,114 posts, read 1,966,926 times
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Sounds almost as bad as the terrible ugly and huge building on the south side of Washington Square that blocks the sun out of half the park.
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Old 07-26-2013, 08:45 AM
 
Location: North Jackson
2,076 posts, read 3,334,972 times
Reputation: 2779
Quote:
Originally Posted by Devout Urbanist View Post
That is also why most of those neighborhoods you mentioned are incredibly expensive, well beyond the reach of the average middle-class family or college-educated young adult. Zoning laws are why San Francisco, New York, and Boston are among the most expensive cities in the country. They present a formidable challenge to developers' efforts to meet demand for more housing. And building up in the form of high-rises like the one depicted is the best way to meet demand because it allows developers to accommodate lots of people without producing sprawl.

Lack of available housing drives prices up in a growing city. Philly is growing and unless more housing gets built it will become just as expensive as other east coast cities. That would be a shame, since it is perhaps the only city in the region where middle and working class people can still afford to live in large numbers. For regular people who want to live in an urban environment, Philly represents a viable alternative to Boston, D.C., New York, and the cities of the Sun Belt. By being overly protective of old buildings and neighborhoods preservationists will simply destroy the true source of the city's character.
The people who already own in that area DON'T CARE. They want zoning restrictions and higher prices. Telling them about SF and Boston is music to their ears. Their dream is for the home they paid $200k for to someday be worth $2M.
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Old 07-26-2013, 09:22 AM
 
Location: back in Philadelphia!
3,260 posts, read 4,877,400 times
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Even in Park Slope (since it was brought up in this thread), there are several high rises and glassy modern new buildings. And it didn't destroy the character of the neighborhood.
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Old 07-26-2013, 09:33 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia, PA
1,567 posts, read 2,663,137 times
Reputation: 1658
Quote:
Originally Posted by JacksonPanther View Post
The people who already own in that area DON'T CARE. They want zoning restrictions and higher prices. Telling them about SF and Boston is music to their ears. Their dream is for the home they paid $200k for to someday be worth $2M.
Damn right. I'm one of them.
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Old 07-26-2013, 10:05 AM
 
Location: University City, Philadelphia
22,632 posts, read 12,789,064 times
Reputation: 15763
Quote:
Originally Posted by Devout Urbanist View Post
That is also why most of those neighborhoods you mentioned are incredibly expensive, well beyond the reach of the average middle-class family or college-educated young adult. Zoning laws are why San Francisco, New York, and Boston are among the most expensive cities in the country. They present a formidable challenge to developers' efforts to meet demand for more housing. And building up in the form of high-rises like the one depicted is the best way to meet demand because it allows developers to accommodate lots of people without producing sprawl.

Lack of available housing drives prices up in a growing city. Philly is growing and unless more housing gets built it will become just as expensive as other east coast cities. That would be a shame, since it is perhaps the only city in the region where middle and working class people can still afford to live in large numbers.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JacksonPanther View Post
The people who already own in that area DON'T CARE. They want zoning restrictions and higher prices. Telling them about SF and Boston is music to their ears. Their dream is for the home they paid $200k for to someday be worth $2M.
Quote:
Originally Posted by mancat100 View Post
Damn right. I'm one of them.
You all make good points.

The bottom line: the Spruce Hill neighborhood of University City is already gentrified. Not gentrifying. Gentrified. That's why there are expensive restaurants like Marigold, Aksim, Distrito, Pod, etc. in the neighborhood. That's why homeowner's property taxes under AVI are going up 200%, 300%, 400%.

It's too late for people looking for "affordable" and lower cost homes in this neighborhood. Too late. Even a smallish row home a block away on either Regent Square or 4200 block of Osage is inching towards half a million dollars! Half a million! An attached row house. Believe it.

Philly has hundreds of other neighborhoods that are affordable, and even a bargain compared to Boston, NYC, or Washington. Working class people will always find housing in Philly.

The neighborhood is beautiful. The residents want to keep it that way.
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Old 07-26-2013, 10:16 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia, PA
2,377 posts, read 2,695,391 times
Reputation: 1492
Someone posted an article about how people in south philly wanted to stop development there so the area would remain "the same" (poor). I don't see how this is different.

Quite frankly the value is more likely to increase when the area becomes more vibrant and holds more population against the bad areas of west philly.
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