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Old 10-01-2015, 05:12 PM
 
4,995 posts, read 3,042,337 times
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Philly superintendent wants more closures, conversions, new schools

Was wondering how other people felt about this? More charters, less public. Idk honestly. I guess I could understand closing dangerous schools with dwindling population and bad scores. Partnering with the Universities to develop new schools is interesting. Could that work on a much larger scale though?
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Old 10-01-2015, 08:41 PM
 
Location: Philly
10,026 posts, read 14,483,472 times
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It'd worked well with penn Alexander so why not try another. I'm not a big fan of chsrter conversions...people should opt in but I understand it's cheaper for the district. While money isn't always the answer the problem is so much of the money goes to pensions, healthcare, and debt rather than kids and teaching
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Old 10-02-2015, 07:56 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pman View Post
It'd worked well with penn Alexander so why not try another. I'm not a big fan of chsrter conversions...people should opt in but I understand it's cheaper for the district. While money isn't always the answer the problem is so much of the money goes to pensions, healthcare, and debt rather than kids and teaching
From what I understand Penn Alexander has a decent percentage of children from poor socioeconomic backgrounds too. As a father, I have no problem one day sending my children to a school with a reasonable percentage of poorer students (say, no more than 20% of the students should be from the lowest 20% of American families). I think the big fear today is not race, but that a school with an overwhelming amount of children of lower socioeconomic backgrounds. While most kids from poor backgrounds are certainly good kids who want to learn, some are not (don't get me wrong there are rich kids who are troublemakers too, but generally a lower percentage of richer kids are than poorer kids). A teacher can teach a class with a few troublemakers, but after there is a limit before they become referees. Lower class sizes might help this. I don't mind having my family do our fair share to help the disenfranchised, but letting my child attend some of the Philadelphia public schools would go way beyond doing a fair share. The continuing economic segregation of the past 50 years makes it very difficult to see an easy way out that solves everyone's issue in the short term.

As others have mentioned, I think it's critical to have some type of tier system as well. If you are a high achiever, you should be placed in a good school with others at your same level, no matter where you are from.
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Old 10-02-2015, 11:15 AM
 
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And how do you go about improving socio-economic standing?
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Old 10-02-2015, 11:32 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Redddog View Post
And how do you go about improving socio-economic standing?
That's a conversation for another day. But no matter how much we improve the socio economic standing of the poor, there will always be a bottom 20% of society. This bottom 20% should not be shoehorned and isolated in select neighborhoods and schools surrounded by poverty. That's really not moral nor is it good for society as a whole.
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Old 10-02-2015, 11:58 AM
 
Location: back in Philadelphia!
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Well, if the bottom 20% was better off, they'd still be 20%, but they'd be better off. Thereby, so would society be as a whole.

But how we get there is the tricky part.
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Old 10-02-2015, 08:15 PM
 
Location: New York City
1,371 posts, read 782,846 times
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Originally Posted by Kevin1813 View Post

As others have mentioned, I think it's critical to have some type of tier system as well. If you are a high achiever, you should be placed in a good school with others at your same level, no matter where you are from.
That would do nothing but continue the segregation that already exists. If you come from a better off, stable background, your chances of academic success are far better than a kid who comes from an unstable one but who is just as smart. If you have parents who care and a solid school environment, your chances of academic achievement skyrocket. If you have absent parents and a unstable school environment, your chances of success are low no matter how hard you try.

So much of academic success has to do with your family's economic position, not how smart you are or the effort you put in.

Fixing the terrible public schools involves improving the disadvantaged's economic situation and stopping the endless cycle of poverty, drugs, crime, and welfare. Those are societal changes that are massive undertakings and take decades to change. Throwing money at the problem or privatizing so a bunch of rich people can make an easy buck while failing to educate just as bad as the public system isn't a good solution.
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Old 10-05-2015, 07:50 AM
 
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Originally Posted by MB1562 View Post
That would do nothing but continue the segregation that already exists.
Strongly agree with the above. It's also been proven that a children with higher scores placed with other children with lower scores raises scores for the entire class.

To anyone interested in 'fixing' the Public School system, I'd recommend reading:

How to Destroy a Public-School System | The Nation

As it gives a good history of how deeply underfunded the Philadelphia school system is, as well as a strong argument against charter schools.

Last edited by theTimmy; 10-05-2015 at 07:51 AM.. Reason: typo
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Old 10-05-2015, 08:35 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theTimmy View Post
How to Destroy a Public-School System | The Nation

As it gives a good history of how deeply underfunded the Philadelphia school system is, as well as a strong argument against charter schools.

I have read this two or three times now and it still bothers me. I could go on forever about how I truly believe there is blood on Corbett's, that rat. I still have faith that Wolf is fighting for us, the common people, in Harrisburg. We need a solid plan that fixes the public schools.

This article came out recently about how the charters are wasting even more money:
http://www.philly.com/philly/educati...ding_boom.html
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Old 10-05-2015, 02:20 PM
 
10,279 posts, read 5,946,889 times
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Originally Posted by thedirtypirate View Post
I have read this two or three times now and it still bothers me. I could go on forever about how I truly believe there is blood on Corbett's, that rat. I still have faith that Wolf is fighting for us, the common people, in Harrisburg. We need a solid plan that fixes the public schools.

This article came out recently about how the charters are wasting even more money:
Charters' building boom
Just consider how things would continue to evolve and deteriorate even more if Corbett had won.
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