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Old 08-18-2013, 09:26 AM
 
177 posts, read 306,228 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blauskies View Post
Problem is PA in general is not clearly defined by regions like other states seem to clearly define, like California, distinctly split up in 3 sections. Depending on what source you look at, there are so many views on the regions that it's confusing. Just like this search displays in maps

regions of pa - Google Search

I am from Central PA originally, Sunbury PA area which is right along the Susquehanna River around 50 miles north of Harrisburg, we never looked at Johnstown and Altoona as Central PA more of Southwestern PA and Williamsport would be North Central PA. Some maps place Sunbury in Northeastern PA and South Central PA as well. I remember the days before the internet, maps would just say Western and Eastern PA, was a lot easier but we still called our area Central PA.
I was just trying to give a basic idea. I wasn't calling Johnstown or Altoona Central PA, but they're definitely not Southwestern PA. Southwestern PA is entirely in Pittsburgh's metro, and Johnstown/Altoona has its own metro and even its own ABC, NBC, etc affiliates. You can't go by "feel" or things like that, because PA as you said is hard to define when it comes to regions. You have to go by its relationship to the other places in its region. Jonhstown and Altoona are in a metro with State College, share TV affiliates, and State College really seems to have risen on the backs of Johnstown and Altoona. Most people would consider State College to be Central PA, yes?
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Old 08-18-2013, 09:29 AM
 
Location: Better half of PA
1,391 posts, read 1,075,335 times
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State College is geographically central PA. Culturally, well..............
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Old 08-18-2013, 09:45 AM
 
177 posts, read 306,228 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sayid Linus View Post
State College is geographically central PA. Culturally, well..............
Haha the same could be said about some parts that are included with Southeastern PA, too. I personally don't consider Upper Montgomery or Upper Bucks to be anything like Southeastern PA, or even the Central part of those counties for that matter. Honestly I don't find many of the exurban areas to be anything like Southeastern PA. This state is, at its heart, rural and somewhat backcountry. That exists throughout the entire state, in every region of it. Honestly there are even boroughs in SEPA that feel like any other borough in PA, including the far-flung ones that most label "small towns". Clifton Heights in Delco, for example, feels a lot like any of the far-flung boroughs in PA, yet happens to be less than 10 miles from Center City. Anybody who has crossed over into there from other parts of the county, especially when coming from Philadelphia, gets the sense that they've really traveled much farther from the city than they have, as it is a post-industrial borough, with multiple Orthodox churches, vacant mills and other industrial buildings, a small, old town center/downtown area, that used to have its own very small school district that was VERY big on football, and it just feels like it's nowhere near the rest of the county and especially nowhere near the city. I've heard people from elsewhere say it reminds them of the sticks. Yet that area is definitely a part of not just SEPA but an urban area that stretches through a large chunk of Delaware County.

By the same token, places like Lewisburg and some of the other older boroughs in other regions in PA remind me a lot of places in SEPA and specifically the older, post-industrial parts of this metro. You can't go to a place like Kensington or Port Richmond and not be reminded of other parts of PA. Nor can you Manayunk or Roxborough. The main features of those neighborhoods are churches and industrial buildings, with small Main Streets or downtown areas as well.

That's because what matters when determining an area's culture or its "feel" is almost solely the history of how that area came to be that way, and that's why you can't go by "feel" or what an area is like culturally when it comes to deciding which place is in what region of the state.
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Old 08-18-2013, 10:17 AM
 
Location: Villanova Pa.
4,910 posts, read 12,771,485 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Avalon08 View Post

I grew up in this area my entire life as well -- in fact, in Plymouth. The point was not about the RIVER <banging head on table>, it was about the fact the OP can't get to Plymouth Meeting by cutting across back roads and such
No matter how you wish to spin it you did mention the Schuylkill River as being part of a barrier problem to possible relocation.

The river isn't the problem. The arteries aren't the problem. The problems with traffic at Plymouth is due to 2 main causes.

1.Location Plymouth Meeting is at the nexus of 2 interstates. 476 + 276.

2.Plymouth Meeting is a major commercial hub(relatively speaking) where a lot of people commute to.


NE of the river or SW of the river it doesn't matter. Plymouth Meeting is going to be a commuter problem for someone coming from Gwynedd Valley(N) as much as its going to be a problem coming from Gladwyne(S) of the river.
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Old 08-18-2013, 11:15 AM
 
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Malvern is a nice area, but kind of far. There are plenty of nice areas closer by so I think you'd be better off looking closer to PM. Chester Springs is beautiful farm land area, not too far from Malvern. There is lots of new development, suburbanization in the area. There is no real downtown area of Chester Springs - Malvern has a little downtown area (the borough) surrounded by a larger area of suburban developments, with some preserved natural space (the Malvern zip code, 19355). There is a pretty wide range of housing available in Malvern, from townhomes and apartments to vast old-money estates. Much of the Main Line is like that (Malvern isn't traditionally a part of the Main Line, but many call it that now).

If it were me moving into the area, I would look for something closer. I also wouldn't think of recommending somewhere like Quakertown from someone coming from Marin County. No offense to Quakertown, but it is less of a cosmopolitan area than places like Bryn Mawr or other of the near-in Philadelphia suburbs.
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Old 08-18-2013, 11:35 AM
 
177 posts, read 306,228 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by souphil View Post
Malvern is a nice area, but kind of far. There are plenty of nice areas closer by so I think you'd be better off looking closer to PM. Chester Springs is beautiful farm land area, not too far from Malvern. There is lots of new development, suburbanization in the area. There is no real downtown area of Chester Springs - Malvern has a little downtown area (the borough) surrounded by a larger area of suburban developments, with some preserved natural space (the Malvern zip code, 19355). There is a pretty wide range of housing available in Malvern, from townhomes and apartments to vast old-money estates. Much of the Main Line is like that (Malvern isn't traditionally a part of the Main Line, but many call it that now).

If it were me moving into the area, I would look for something closer. I also wouldn't think of recommending somewhere like Quakertown from someone coming from Marin County. No offense to Quakertown, but it is less of a cosmopolitan area than places like Bryn Mawr or other of the near-in Philadelphia suburbs.
My thoughts exactly.

This metro is one of those weird places where people in the metro have a much different view of where the best areas in the metro are and what makes an area the best than people who come to this metro from elsewhere. People from outside of the area tend to love the more urban, historic places whereas people in this metro always seem to rate the most suburban and exurban areas as being the best simply because of their reputation and the bias that person has towards those types of areas.

This seems to be common among metros where the suburbs grew at the expense of the city.
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Old 08-18-2013, 12:46 PM
 
Location: SW Florida
4,614 posts, read 6,271,014 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rainrock View Post
No matter how you wish to spin it you did mention the Schuylkill River as being part of a barrier problem to possible relocation.

The river isn't the problem. The arteries aren't the problem. The problems with traffic at Plymouth is due to 2 main causes.

1.Location Plymouth Meeting is at the nexus of 2 interstates. 476 + 276.

2.Plymouth Meeting is a major commercial hub(relatively speaking) where a lot of people commute to.


NE of the river or SW of the river it doesn't matter. Plymouth Meeting is going to be a commuter problem for someone coming from Gwynedd Valley(N) as much as its going to be a problem coming from Gladwyne(S) of the river.
I'm not spinning anything, and I do not make up things to support my opinion....such as saying there are 15 or 20 ways to cross the river but not mentioning most are railroad bridges.

Commuting from Gwynedd Valley to Plymouth Meeting is absolutely not the same as coming from Gladwyne, anyone who can read a map can see that. (I also lived in Gwynedd too, so I'm familiar with that traffic.) And your earlier KOP-to-Plymouth Meeting example was irrelevant, since no one was talking about the OP moving to KOP. There are a million different back roads to take if one gets stuck in traffic from Gwynedd to Plymouth Meeting. The OP will just have to look at her map to figure out who's making more sense here.
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Old 08-18-2013, 12:49 PM
 
Location: SW Florida
4,614 posts, read 6,271,014 times
Reputation: 7809
Quote:
Originally Posted by s1oozne View Post
My thoughts exactly.

This metro is one of those weird places where people in the metro have a much different view of where the best areas in the metro are and what makes an area the best than people who come to this metro from elsewhere. People from outside of the area tend to love the more urban, historic places whereas people in this metro always seem to rate the most suburban and exurban areas as being the best simply because of their reputation and the bias that person has towards those types of areas.

This seems to be common among metros where the suburbs grew at the expense of the city.
I agree. Quakertown is very, very different from the original places mentioned by the OP.
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Old 08-18-2013, 01:33 PM
 
33 posts, read 43,630 times
Reputation: 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by s1oozne View Post
My thoughts exactly.

This metro is one of those weird places where people in the metro have a much different view of where the best areas in the metro are and what makes an area the best than people who come to this metro from elsewhere. People from outside of the area tend to love the more urban, historic places whereas people in this metro always seem to rate the most suburban and exurban areas as being the best simply because of their reputation and the bias that person has towards those types of areas.
Most people simply try to help by giving their opinion to a specific place in question. Others seem to have a larger convoluted agenda.

Last edited by toobusytoday; 08-18-2013 at 06:55 PM.. Reason: fixed typo - removed faux mod comment
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Old 08-18-2013, 06:59 PM
 
Location: SW Florida
4,614 posts, read 6,271,014 times
Reputation: 7809
I didn't see any "us v. them" mentality. I see people trying to help the OP with the realities of traffic, and the realities of living in the immediate metro suburbs v. a more rural area. So people have different opinions -- it's all germane to the original topic.
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