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Old 08-22-2013, 05:54 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia, PA
1,567 posts, read 2,662,851 times
Reputation: 1658

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Quote:
Originally Posted by CarryOn View Post
And if you're like us, approaching middle age (50) and you never had kids, Philly is like a siren, calling to the desolate Midwest, "Come...play among my cheesesteak parlors and dance in the streets where Liberty was born..."

That's what we're planning, anyway.
Cheesesteak parlours. Ha!!!
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Old 08-22-2013, 06:05 AM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
5,673 posts, read 10,245,988 times
Reputation: 9515
The political strategy we are witnessing is to starve the schools enough to justify turning them over to private operators. The urban schools, Philadelphia being a prime example, are the low hanging fruit in this strategy. Between new mandates and less funding, privatization looks inevitable, though the results will likely be no better than what is currently in place. The purpose of privatizing in this scenario is not student improvement, but transferring public money to connected private hands.

But let's be clear about a couple of things. This is a bipartisan effort that both parties are willingly engaging in. And children and families do play a role in school failure. There are many students and families that place no value on education and do nothing but sabotage the learning process for themselves and others, the continuation of a cycle that has existed for years. Schools have a mandate to provide an education and are by and large stuck with a lot of kids who don't care to be educated. If public schools could freely expel students, they would improve exponentially almost overnight.

Suburban districts may or may not face the same fate. This is one area where the fragmentation of school districts in Pennsylvania plays a role. Smaller, high achieving districts may have a community that will mobilize against corporate takeover of schools. Less cohesive communities may not. Don't be surprised to see district consolidation on the agenda, because once the community becomes too large, it may be too fragmented to offer a cohesive face.

Final thought for people in favor of privatization - to use a cliche, be careful what you wish for. If you think this whole process will result in higher achieving schools that are run more economically, well, I'd like to talk with you about a great deal on a time share.
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Old 08-22-2013, 08:12 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia
11,942 posts, read 10,817,344 times
Reputation: 8139
Quote:
Originally Posted by maf763 View Post
The political strategy we are witnessing is to starve the schools enough to justify turning them over to private operators. The urban schools, Philadelphia being a prime example, are the low hanging fruit in this strategy. Between new mandates and less funding, privatization looks inevitable, though the results will likely be no better than what is currently in place. The purpose of privatizing in this scenario is not student improvement, but transferring public money to connected private hands.

But let's be clear about a couple of things. This is a bipartisan effort that both parties are willingly engaging in. And children and families do play a role in school failure. There are many students and families that place no value on education and do nothing but sabotage the learning process for themselves and others, the continuation of a cycle that has existed for years. Schools have a mandate to provide an education and are by and large stuck with a lot of kids who don't care to be educated. If public schools could freely expel students, they would improve exponentially almost overnight.

Suburban districts may or may not face the same fate. This is one area where the fragmentation of school districts in Pennsylvania plays a role. Smaller, high achieving districts may have a community that will mobilize against corporate takeover of schools. Less cohesive communities may not. Don't be surprised to see district consolidation on the agenda, because once the community becomes too large, it may be too fragmented to offer a cohesive face.

Final thought for people in favor of privatization - to use a cliche, be careful what you wish for. If you think this whole process will result in higher achieving schools that are run more economically, well, I'd like to talk with you about a great deal on a time share.
Excellent post, repped.
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Old 08-22-2013, 08:36 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia, PA
1,567 posts, read 2,662,851 times
Reputation: 1658
Quote:
Originally Posted by maf763 View Post
The political strategy we are witnessing is to starve the schools enough to justify turning them over to private operators. The urban schools, Philadelphia being a prime example, are the low hanging fruit in this strategy. Between new mandates and less funding, privatization looks inevitable, though the results will likely be no better than what is currently in place. The purpose of privatizing in this scenario is not student improvement, but transferring public money to connected private hands.

But let's be clear about a couple of things. This is a bipartisan effort that both parties are willingly engaging in. And children and families do play a role in school failure. There are many students and families that place no value on education and do nothing but sabotage the learning process for themselves and others, the continuation of a cycle that has existed for years. Schools have a mandate to provide an education and are by and large stuck with a lot of kids who don't care to be educated. If public schools could freely expel students, they would improve exponentially almost overnight.

Suburban districts may or may not face the same fate. This is one area where the fragmentation of school districts in Pennsylvania plays a role. Smaller, high achieving districts may have a community that will mobilize against corporate takeover of schools. Less cohesive communities may not. Don't be surprised to see district consolidation on the agenda, because once the community becomes too large, it may be too fragmented to offer a cohesive face.

Final thought for people in favor of privatization - to use a cliche, be careful what you wish for. If you think this whole process will result in higher achieving schools that are run more economically, well, I'd like to talk with you about a great deal on a time share.
I agree with 98% of this. The effort may be bi-partisan in that everyone's hands are dirty, however only one party has a strong doctrinaire anti-public school contingent in its ranks. All are guilty, but some are more guilty.
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Old 08-22-2013, 10:44 AM
 
8,048 posts, read 18,469,927 times
Reputation: 2738
There is (at least) one other thread talking about the plight of the Philadelphia School District. Going forward, returning to the original topic of general pros and cons will extend the life of this thread and minimize infractions.
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