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Old 08-28-2013, 04:57 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
36 posts, read 37,447 times
Reputation: 30

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I am just so excited about Philly's future. Its hosting a global event in 2015, possibly be a potential candidate for the 2024 Summer Olympics, Philadelphia is going through a renaissance stage and yea like other big cities it has it problems like crime and bad public schools like NYC, Chicago, L.A. and D.C. but look at how Philly has come a long way since the 80s and 90s. How do you think Philly's future will be like?
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Old 08-29-2013, 08:30 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia
11,942 posts, read 10,818,746 times
Reputation: 8139
I think Philly has been revitalizing and growing for quite some time now but things will only snowball and accelerate in the coming years. Real Estate prices in Boston, NYC and DC are not sustainable and I find it worth noting that Warren Buffett and Berkshire Hatthaway recently bought the largest real estate company in the region-Prudential Fox and Roach.
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Old 08-29-2013, 08:35 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia, PA
1,567 posts, read 2,663,137 times
Reputation: 1658
I'm picturing Bartertown from Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome.
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Old 08-29-2013, 09:32 AM
 
Location: Center City
7,085 posts, read 8,214,674 times
Reputation: 10149
I am relatively new to the city, living here going on 3 years. It is an amazing and vibrant city, and I see growth and gentrification moving out in all directions from Center City. There are three big challenges the city faces going forward. If it can tackle these, I think the Philly will not only continue to grow, it will be a dynamo.

The first is jobs. I'd like to open the Inky and see more frequent announcements of new businesses locating to the city. I am not talking about new retail opening on Walnut, but big companies making the decision to locate their offices inside the city limits. This will take some package of enticements to lure the financial and pharma companies currently in the suburbs to set up shop in Philly when there leases expire. Also, there need to be not just jobs for "professionals" but for working class folks. Other cities do this. Philly needs to look at how they accomplish that and do the same.

The second area is education. The school system is abysmal. That said, Philly is not unique among large urban cities in facing daunting challenges in funding and providing the quality of education its citizens deserve. With such a large percentage of our populace in poverty, good education is one of the key means for giving people skills that can move them out of poverty.

The third area is crime. I am lucky. I am a white guy who spends nearly all my time in the 2 square mile happy and carefree enclave of Center City. It is easy to forget how big the city is and how many people have to deal with crime on a daily basis. I can't even imagine what it must be like to not be able to sit on the front porch of your home without fearing a stray bullet from a drive-by might sail your way. Honestly - can you imagine that being your daily reality? For far too many of our innocent citizens, this is a way of life.

I am neither an economist nor a social scientist, so I don't know how to best tackle any of these challenges. One thing that is clear to me is that these three challenges are inter-related. I am not a Negadelphian, however. There are a couple of things I've observed that are heartening regarding what I've outlined above. First, it is not as if I am the only one who sees these challenges - I do see the city investing effort and making progress on each of these areas. The second is the people of this city. One thing I really like about Philadelphia is that the folks who are from here are really invested in their city. It is not a generic transient city where folks come from all over simply to make a buck and then move on. Philadelphians have turned this city around and are rightly proud of that. Folks who live here will figure out how to turn these current challenges into opportunities. For that reason, I have a lot of confidence in the future of Philadelphia.
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Old 08-29-2013, 10:45 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia, PA
1,567 posts, read 2,663,137 times
Reputation: 1658
Quote:
Originally Posted by mancat100 View Post
I'm picturing Bartertown from Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome.
I kid. I kid. Philly has a great future. We just need better leadership.
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Old 08-29-2013, 10:48 AM
 
Location: South Jersey
7,780 posts, read 18,921,816 times
Reputation: 2329
Quote:
Originally Posted by mancat100 View Post
I kid. I kid. Philly has a great future. We just need better leadership.

I agree.. The city will do fine in the future..
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Old 08-29-2013, 11:23 AM
 
Location: New York City
6,227 posts, read 5,562,899 times
Reputation: 3325
Quote:
Originally Posted by jm02 View Post
I am relatively new to the city, living here going on 3 years. It is an amazing and vibrant city, and I see growth and gentrification moving out in all directions from Center City. There are three big challenges the city faces going forward. If it can tackle these, I think the Philly will not only continue to grow, it will be a dynamo.

The first is jobs. I'd like to open the Inky and see more frequent announcements of new businesses locating to the city. I am not talking about new retail opening on Walnut, but big companies making the decision to locate their offices inside the city limits. This will take some package of enticements to lure the financial and pharma companies currently in the suburbs to set up shop in Philly when there leases expire. Also, there need to be not just jobs for "professionals" but for working class folks. Other cities do this. Philly needs to look at how they accomplish that and do the same.

The second area is education. The school system is abysmal. That said, Philly is not unique among large urban cities in facing daunting challenges in funding and providing the quality of education its citizens deserve. With such a large percentage of our populace in poverty, good education is one of the key means for giving people skills that can move them out of poverty.

The third area is crime. I am lucky. I am a white guy who spends nearly all my time in the 2 square mile happy and carefree enclave of Center City. It is easy to forget how big the city is and how many people have to deal with crime on a daily basis. I can't even imagine what it must be like to not be able to sit on the front porch of your home without fearing a stray bullet from a drive-by might sail your way. Honestly - can you imagine that being your daily reality? For far too many of our innocent citizens, this is a way of life.

I am neither an economist nor a social scientist, so I don't know how to best tackle any of these challenges. One thing that is clear to me is that these three challenges are inter-related. I am not a Negadelphian, however. There are a couple of things I've observed that are heartening regarding what I've outlined above. First, it is not as if I am the only one who sees these challenges - I do see the city investing effort and making progress on each of these areas. The second is the people of this city. One thing I really like about Philadelphia is that the folks who are from here are really invested in their city. It is not a generic transient city where folks come from all over simply to make a buck and then move on. Philadelphians have turned this city around and are rightly proud of that. Folks who live here will figure out how to turn these current challenges into opportunities. For that reason, I have a lot of confidence in the future of Philadelphia.

Rather than taking jobs away from the suburbs, I would rather companies from other cities move to the city. Nothing better than having a huge business base in the city and suburbs.
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Old 08-29-2013, 12:12 PM
 
95 posts, read 148,572 times
Reputation: 103
If we want to keep the new residents who are improving existing neighborhoods, and continue attracting more, access to good public education is key. Middle class parents who care about their kids' education have to reasonably have a way to educate their kids without having to pay for private school, or else they will just move to the suburbs. Improving public education across the board is a hard problem, but in the medium-term, a stop gap measure might be to open up more exam schools like Masterman and Central. There should be enough such seats that those reasonably motivated to encourage their kids to study should be able to expect admission into one of them.

Taxes are of course the other big issue. The wage tax discourages living in the city vs. suburbs, especially for those with jobs in the suburbs, and high business taxes encourage jobs to be in the suburbs. Both have to be lowered. To make up the revenue, we should raise real estate taxes. This is painful, but at least property can't move -- people and businesses can. Perhaps these can be lowered in the future once the city expands its tax base.
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Old 08-29-2013, 12:38 PM
 
Location: Center City
7,085 posts, read 8,214,674 times
Reputation: 10149
Quote:
Originally Posted by cpomp View Post
Rather than taking jobs away from the suburbs, I would rather companies from other cities move to the city. Nothing better than having a huge business base in the city and suburbs.
Good point. Given the option, I would always take jobs from outside the metro. While I agree the city and the suburbs are all in this together, the leaders of each have their own business to run themselves - their cities. From time to time, businesses come to crossroads where they decide whether to stay put or re-locate. Not only Philly but the other suburbs see this as an opportunity to enhance their employment base. You can't tell me some township in DelCo wouldn't have welcomed GSK with open arms, rather than see them locate from CC to the Navy Yard. The leaders of Philly would be derelict in their responsibilities if they were not on the lookout for opportunities to attract new businesses from anywhere, including, sometimes, their own suburbs.
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Old 08-29-2013, 03:05 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia, PA
2,377 posts, read 2,695,391 times
Reputation: 1492
When it becomes the heavy urban density alternative to NYC I think it's going to explode.
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