U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Pennsylvania > Philadelphia
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 12-11-2007, 08:04 AM
 
Location: Boston Metrowest (via the Philly area)
4,745 posts, read 7,845,060 times
Reputation: 4700

Advertisements

I just thought this was an interesting article, as it has a lot of implications for more sprawl and suburbanization of Southeastern PA given the economic advantages of living in a cheaper area but working in an area with higher wages. However, I wonder what the cost-of-living will have in store in about 10 years for adjacent areas such as Lancaster, Reading, and Allentown as Philly-area commuters continue to live farther out from their jobs. Will we have any "bargain" areas -- or rural areas, for that matter -- left in this part of the state?

The new western pioneers
Lancaster County is becoming the edge of Phila. commuting.

By Tom Infield

Inquirer Staff Writer
Jim and Debby Geissel liked their twin house in Northeast Philadelphia. But as their family grew to include two boys, with another soon on the way, they began to look at larger homes in the Route 611 corridor north of the city.


The new western pioneers | Philadelphia Inquirer | 12/11/2007 (broken link)

Last edited by Administrator; 12-12-2007 at 01:34 AM.. Reason: [cut - too much of the article reposted - copyright violation]
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-11-2007, 09:11 AM
 
8,048 posts, read 18,469,927 times
Reputation: 2738
Thanks for the article, Duderino! I'm disappointed but not surprised that sprawl has reached into Lancaster County. As you're familiar with DC, you know that it will only get worse unless/until Philly and other metros figure out a way to improve the employment and education prospects in the city core.

There will probably always be people who want their quiet acre of land. But if the article is any measure, a household's decision to commute from the exurbs seems to be influenced as much by circumstance as by choice.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-11-2007, 09:53 AM
 
Location: Boston Metrowest (via the Philly area)
4,745 posts, read 7,845,060 times
Reputation: 4700
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tone509 View Post
Thanks for the article, Duderino! I'm disappointed but not surprised that sprawl has reached into Lancaster County. As you're familiar with DC, you know that it will only get worse unless/until Philly and other metros figure out a way to improve the employment and education prospects in the city core.
Most definitely. I think it's important for our metropolitan areas to grow economically, but it's really not necessary to deplete valuable countryside in the process. I've read articles recently about some firms contemplating relocation from the suburbs to the city (i.e., Unisys), so hopefully trends like that will continue and counteract the trend of exurban/suburban development.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tone509 View Post
There will probably always be people who want their quiet acre of land. But if the article is any measure, a household's decision to commute from the exurbs seems to be influenced as much by circumstance as by choice.
That's an excellent point. I know lots of people just prefer suburban living, but I think more living/lifestyle opportunities are arising in areas in or close to the urban core that were not there 10-15 years ago -- the new, large-scale "lifestyle center" that is currently being constructed in King of Prussia is a perfect example:

Village at Valley Forge.

While farther commutes leading to more bedroom communities in far away farm land will certainly continue, I just hope more Smart Growth developments such as these will win out in the end.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-12-2007, 05:22 PM
 
Location: Villanova Pa.
4,910 posts, read 12,771,485 times
Reputation: 2635
130 mile daily roundtrip is absolutely ridiculous. I could maybe see living in Ephrata if you worked in Exton or maybe West Chester but not South Philly. 3 hours a day commuting,$7800 a year in gas, wear and tear/tires etc on the car. No thanks. Those people could live in Downingtown for a few more bucks and cut their commute in half. These lancaster commuters are the extreme exception and not the norm.

Now in 25-30 years as the western suburbs continue to grow, I can definitely see Lancaster/Berks Counties getting drawn into the Philadlephia metro.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-12-2007, 05:25 PM
 
Location: Rural Central Texas
3,617 posts, read 9,490,936 times
Reputation: 5474
Well, my current commute is 1,368 miles each way, but I only do one roundtrip a week and by air........does this count? The furthest I 'comfortably' commuted on a daily basis is 45 miles in about 50 minutes.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-12-2007, 07:54 PM
 
992 posts, read 3,287,613 times
Reputation: 243
That's too freakin far.. I like my 15 minute commute from Cinnaminsion to the northeast
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-13-2007, 06:43 AM
 
Location: Metropolis
1,547 posts, read 3,477,198 times
Reputation: 972
Quote:
Originally Posted by rainrock View Post
130 mile daily roundtrip is absolutely ridiculous. I could maybe see living in Ephrata if you worked in Exton or maybe West Chester but not South Philly. 3 hours a day commuting,$7800 a year in gas, wear and tear/tires etc on the car. No thanks. Those people could live in Downingtown for a few more bucks and cut their commute in half. These lancaster commuters are the extreme exception and not the norm.

Now in 25-30 years as the western suburbs continue to grow, I can definitely see Lancaster/Berks Counties getting drawn into the Philadlephia metro.
Berks has already recently been added to the Philadelphia combined statistical area. I guess it's a matter of time before Lancaster does. Or maybe someone here knows whether Berks is currently much more connected to the Philadelphia area than Lancaster is.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-13-2007, 07:45 AM
 
Location: Philaburbia
33,072 posts, read 61,890,891 times
Reputation: 55491
I go insane driving from Norristown to East Falls -- a 13-mile drive that takes anywhere from 30 to 50 minutes. I couldn't begin to imagine driving in from Lancaster County.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Pennsylvania > Philadelphia
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top