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Old 04-01-2016, 09:58 AM
 
10,265 posts, read 5,934,396 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1ondoner View Post
Have you been to Houston? Sometimes it's important to have a wider perspective. You've lived in Philly, probably all your life, so I see things very differently from you.
Oh, course... However you don't know anything about me really...

Yes, I've been to Houston. I have family living there who were displaced by Katrina. I'm just a a diehard east coast person and care the most about what happens/exists in the NE.

Just because I have lived in the Phila. area all of my life, and have generational history in the area, doesn't mean I haven't traveled. I'm single(always have been), had a very successful career in IT. I have resources and free time that allowed me/allow me to do what I want, pretty much, when I want to... like go to Europe multiple times.

Btw, my best friend lives in western Nebraska. It's fascinating to spend time there because the people are very different than me.
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Old 04-01-2016, 10:00 AM
 
10,265 posts, read 5,934,396 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BR Valentine View Post
You're correct that Philadelphia is a major player in medicine and life sciences. No one who knows either industry would say otherwise. What is different between Philadelphia and Houston is the physical scale of the Texas Medical Center and the CHOP / Penn campus. Texas Medical Center is the largest medical complex in the world. You'd have to have something like all of Penn's hospitals, CHOP, the VA and Jeff, plus maybe Temple on a single contiguous campus to match the scale of TMC. That said the size of the TX Med Ctr does not make Houston a more important location for medicine or life sciences than Philadelphia.
Thanks. That's pretty much what I was trying to convey. You said it better than me.
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Old 04-01-2016, 11:17 AM
 
Location: New York City
6,224 posts, read 5,562,899 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BR Valentine View Post
You're correct that Philadelphia is a major player in medicine and life sciences. No one who knows either industry would say otherwise. What is different between Philadelphia and Houston is the physical scale of the Texas Medical Center and the CHOP / Penn campus. Texas Medical Center is the largest medical complex in the world. You'd have to have something like all of Penn's hospitals, CHOP, the VA and Jeff, plus maybe Temple on a single contiguous campus to match the scale of TMC. That said the size of the TX Med Ctr does not make Houston a more important location for medicine or life sciences than Philadelphia.
And Philadelphia and suburbs are among the largest pharmaceutical producers in the world.
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Old 04-01-2016, 11:32 AM
 
1,114 posts, read 1,966,926 times
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The problem with Philadelphia, and PA as a whole, is that it's a lousy place to do business. Philly has continued to bleed large employers for the past few decades, and absent a major change in the political climate, I don't see that changing. On the bright side, the lack of high-paying jobs keeps housing prices affordable.
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Old 04-01-2016, 11:43 AM
 
Location: Dude...., I'm right here
1,241 posts, read 798,194 times
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I guess you mean Philly/NJ in general. But this is not obvious to outsiders and I think this is one industry that the elected officials should be pushing forward.

Life sciences industry trends

As we speak, Texas is eating into California when it comes to attracting technology firms. I think Toyota moved their US HQ from CA to TX, and they have a really big presence in CA.

http://www.autonews.com/article/2015...rters-in-texas


Quote:
Originally Posted by cpomp View Post
And Philadelphia and suburbs are among the largest pharmaceutical producers in the world.
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Old 04-01-2016, 12:03 PM
 
609 posts, read 456,927 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1ondoner View Post
I guess you mean Philly/NJ in general. But this is not obvious to outsiders and I think this is one industry that the elected officials should be pushing forward.

Life sciences industry trends

As we speak, Texas is eating into California when it comes to attracting technology firms. I think Toyota moved their US HQ from CA to TX, and they have a really big presence in CA.

http://www.autonews.com/article/2015...rters-in-texas
Philadelphia's stature, its strengths and weaknesses are well known to the people who work in the industry. That's all that maters. Few people outside the industry know that NYC is a significant player in biopharma and next to no one outside of life sciences knows that Rockefeller University exists or that it's a leading location of life sciences research. The city and state have aggressively promoted life sciences for decades. Why do you think the U City Sciences Center was created?

Also, any ranking of life sciences clusters that puts RDU ahead of the Bay Area as the one you linked does is of questionable value. Boston and the Bay Area are the two dominant regions in life sciences whether you measure by patents, federally funded research, employment, etc.
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Old 04-01-2016, 12:33 PM
 
Location: Dude...., I'm right here
1,241 posts, read 798,194 times
Reputation: 731
I'm not a fan of incubator hubs because every city seems to have them and they only seem to attract guys who couldn't hack it in the real world. I'd rather a big company announce they are moving into the area because it raises the profile of the city. What's more, stuff from incubators can end up in another part of the world and they can reap the benefits.


Quote:
Originally Posted by BR Valentine View Post
Philadelphia's stature, its strengths and weaknesses are well known to the people who work in the industry. That's all that maters. Few people outside the industry know that NYC is a significant player in biopharma and next to no one outside of life sciences knows that Rockefeller University exists or that it's a leading location of life sciences research. The city and state have aggressively promoted life sciences for decades. Why do you think the U City Sciences Center was created?

Also, any ranking of life sciences clusters that puts RDU ahead of the Bay Area as the one you linked does is of questionable value. Boston and the Bay Area are the two dominant regions in life sciences whether you measure by patents, federally funded research, employment, etc.
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Old 04-01-2016, 12:37 PM
 
1,114 posts, read 1,966,926 times
Reputation: 420
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1ondoner View Post
I guess you mean Philly/NJ in general. But this is not obvious to outsiders and I think this is one industry that the elected officials should be pushing forward.

Life sciences industry trends

As we speak, Texas is eating into California when it comes to attracting technology firms. I think Toyota moved their US HQ from CA to TX, and they have a really big presence in CA.

http://www.autonews.com/article/2015...rters-in-texas
Sadly, we will continue to see more and more employers relocate to places such as Texas, Georgia, Tennessee, and North Carolina. You are correct about Toyota - there's no good reason for any company to have an HQ in California, unless they're in the Technology sector. Similarly, Mercedes Benz is moving their US HQ from NJ to Atlanta. High cost, high tax state to a low cost state.
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Old 04-01-2016, 12:47 PM
 
Location: Dude...., I'm right here
1,241 posts, read 798,194 times
Reputation: 731
Yeah, big companies bring high paying jobs and money into an area. The South is getting a lot of investments. I've been to places in the South in the middle of nowhere but which have huge industrial sites. I'm involved with one such company, which closed it's location in NJ and moved South. I was mesmerized on my first trip to their location. I even met people who had moved from PA/NJ to work in the South and they loved it although it was in the middle of nowhere. People in the area looking are stuck gazing at Philly in the rear view mirror while the South is slowly eating into their lunch.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Angus215 View Post
Sadly, we will continue to see more and more employers relocate to places such as Texas, Georgia, Tennessee, and North Carolina. You are correct about Toyota - there's no good reason for any company to have an HQ in California, unless they're in the Technology sector. Similarly, Mercedes Benz is moving their US HQ from NJ to Atlanta. High cost, high tax state to a low cost state.
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Old 04-01-2016, 12:50 PM
 
1,114 posts, read 1,966,926 times
Reputation: 420
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1ondoner View Post
I'm not a fan of incubator hubs because every city seems to have them and they only seem to attract guys who couldn't hack it in the real world. I'd rather a big company announce they are moving into the area because it raises the profile of the city. What's more, stuff from incubators can end up in another part of the world and they can reap the benefits.
Highly unlikely that a large company will move to a city with a 4% wage tax in a state with a 10% corporate tax. Philly's best days are well behind it in terms of being a corporate hub. It's continues to lose corporate HQ's on a regular basis (recently Sunoco, Cigna, GSK, and Rohm & Haas), either due to acquisition or relocation, and nobody is moving in to take their place. Not just a Philadelphia problem, obviously. Part of a larger nation-wide trend to move to more competitive business environments.
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