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Old 04-06-2016, 11:04 AM
 
Location: Dude...., I'm right here
1,241 posts, read 798,194 times
Reputation: 731

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Ha ha ha. COL in Albuquerque is low and they have the best Mexican cuisine in that part of the country.

That said, I support the "low wage" model. It's good for the company but it is even better for employees who are lowly paid.



Quote:
Originally Posted by kyb01 View Post
It's obvious why. They don't have to actually pay them anything meaning they can keep the "popular" corporate "low wage" model with these workers in these locations.
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Old 04-06-2016, 11:07 AM
 
Location: Boston Metrowest (via the Philly area)
4,743 posts, read 7,845,060 times
Reputation: 4700
Quote:
Originally Posted by cpomp View Post
You can't win em all. Once the new tower is finished in Philadelphia, there will be several hundred new jobs mostly in the technology and research sector added to the city, higher paying and more prestige for the city in the technology and entertainment industries.
Yes, call center jobs tend to be highly concentrated in the lower-cost/lower-wage parts of the country--think mostly the South and Midwest.

Also, not trying to be too dismissive or elitist--because I know it's an honest living for many people--but I think we should all agree Philly should be aspiring grow much more than back-office, clerical jobs.

You're absolutely right that the STEM/creative-type jobs that Comcast is creating with its latest HQ addition is exactly the kind of job growth the city should be promoting.
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Old 04-06-2016, 11:13 AM
 
10,265 posts, read 5,934,396 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1ondoner View Post
Ha ha ha. COL in Albuquerque is low and they have the best Mexican cuisine in that part of the country.

That said, I support the "low wage" model. It's good for the company but it is even better for employees who are lowly paid.
Like so many conservatives(you seem like one)it's not surprising that you would push, and believe in, low wage models.

I've only passed through NM and have never spent any time there. But I have good friends in Tucson. So don't start, lol, with how I don't know about that part of the country.
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Old 04-06-2016, 12:56 PM
 
Location: Dude...., I'm right here
1,241 posts, read 798,194 times
Reputation: 731
I believe I'm liberal when it comes to social issues and I also believe in the complete separation of the church and the state. However, I also try to be practical.

Not everyone can command high wages. People, are like water, that finds it's own level. Most people over estimate their capabilities or what it takes to rise to a certain level. You need to have talent, discipline and also put in the effort. You were in IT and you can attest that not everyone can do IT jobs. I certainly don't think I could.

So, not everyone can earn a high wage and this is where the "low wage" model comes in. Actually, not everyone is employable, for various reasons.



Quote:
Originally Posted by kyb01 View Post
Like so many conservatives(you seem like one)it's not surprising that you would push, and believe in, low wage models.

I've only passed through NM and have never spent any time there. But I have good friends in Tucson. So don't start, lol, with how I don't know about that part of the country.
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Old 04-19-2016, 10:26 PM
 
48 posts, read 89,063 times
Reputation: 134
In 20 years...

1. The City of Philadelphia's leaders will be assembling yet another commission to investigate what should be done about high business and wage taxes.

2. Any number of presently working/lower middle class (what's left of them now) neighborhoods will become what Fishtown will have long become by 2036 and Manayunk and others before it: places to go out to eat, debate about "amazing" beer selections, and get laid (before of course, moving to Penn Wynne just to get the kids into LM schools) rather than places to live long-term, raise kids, worship, and get involved in real community.

3. The City will still be debating whether to alter the ten-year tax abatement on new residential construction.

4. The Inquirer will exist only online, and even then, as a tab to click on a main page called "Republicansarestupidatalltimes.com". It will be doing another series on how to "fix" our "troubled" schools finding that "great teachers" are crucial to "great schools."

5. A nearly 93-year-old Bob Brady will be preparing for the city's massive "We make Boies Penrose look like a choirboy" festival celebrating the city's exciting 84 years of one-party rule.

6. The resident wage tax rate will drop to 3.6% from the present 3.7%, but a pack of cigarettes will cost $15.95.

7. The Temple Stadium battle will have become an actual battle with city authorities and Temple officials pitted against civil society activists who largely live in Mount Airy, and Temple students that are deathly afraid of Templetown and North Philly in general but are certain they're concerned for the well-being of the neighborhood.

That's enough sardonic rant for this thread.

The real answer is that lots will improve, but I fear that some of the entrenched, especially political problems in the city, will persist because many of the younger, creative people in the city do not get involved in politics in the city thus leaving the system to fester as-is.
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Old 04-20-2016, 05:19 AM
 
10,265 posts, read 5,934,396 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kukla65th View Post
In 20 years...

1. The City of Philadelphia's leaders will be assembling yet another commission to investigate what should be done about high business and wage taxes.

2. Any number of presently working/lower middle class (what's left of them now) neighborhoods will become what Fishtown will have long become by 2036 and Manayunk and others before it: places to go out to eat, debate about "amazing" beer selections, and get laid (before of course, moving to Penn Wynne just to get the kids into LM schools) rather than places to live long-term, raise kids, worship, and get involved in real community.

3. The City will still be debating whether to alter the ten-year tax abatement on new residential construction.

4. The Inquirer will exist only online, and even then, as a tab to click on a main page called "Republicansarestupidatalltimes.com". It will be doing another series on how to "fix" our "troubled" schools finding that "great teachers" are crucial to "great schools."

5. A nearly 93-year-old Bob Brady will be preparing for the city's massive "We make Boies Penrose look like a choirboy" festival celebrating the city's exciting 84 years of one-party rule.

6. The resident wage tax rate will drop to 3.6% from the present 3.7%, but a pack of cigarettes will cost $15.95.

7. The Temple Stadium battle will have become an actual battle with city authorities and Temple officials pitted against civil society activists who largely live in Mount Airy, and Temple students that are deathly afraid of Templetown and North Philly in general but are certain they're concerned for the well-being of the neighborhood.

That's enough sardonic rant for this thread.

The real answer is that lots will improve, but I fear that some of the entrenched, especially political problems in the city, will persist because many of the younger, creative people in the city do not get involved in politics in the city thus leaving the system to fester as-is.
Funny list considering that no one predicted that Fishtown, for example, would morph into what it is now in 1996. So predictions are usually BS... Well, you know that...
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Old 05-02-2016, 09:51 PM
 
1 posts, read 883 times
Reputation: 11
Everyone talks about Texas and even Phoenix. Has anyone ever been to these cities? They are gigantic suburban sprawls which kills downtown, city life, and culture. A car is a necessity. There is no other options. You can't even walk to a coffee shop. Many people I know are astonished that you can visit Philly without renting a car. And these cities have shiny new infrastructure, but they lack the sense of city life and community. They are basically just large suburbs. I just moved to Philly and it has many problems, but it also has many positive attributes that my generation have been seeking for so long. I lived abroad a few years and many of my friends who did too were miserable in Phoenix and Dallas. Having experienced trains, active parks full of people, walking 10 feet to a restaurant, and hopping on a train or bus in other countries made us realize we do not have to be car dependent and that we aren't weird for not wanting a suburban lifestyle. In fact, most of the world lived like this. We can't afford NYC or SFO, but with all the problems, Philly fits our needs for now.

As for taxes, I agree that PA needs to fix all the corruption. But someone has to pay taxes eventually. In the southern states, people move to lower taxes, and then 10 years later they have to figure out what social service to cut to help pay for the additional highway lanes needed and other infrastructure projects to deal with overcrowding. They are even talking about putting in a toll road just outside of Charlotte that will be $20 during rush hour because their highways are so congested and they desperately need the money to help pay for the construction. I'm not an expert about all of this, but I do know that someone, somewhere eventually has to pay for things. We can't just keep moving everything to Texas and promise to not raise taxes.

Also, Texas has hundreds of thousands of illegal immigrants who keep wages down. Unfortanely for them, they also have no rights and are exploited severely for their labor. Most Americans would never work in such conditions for such pay. People say Democrats want illegals in this country for the votes, but big business wants them even more for cheap labor without paying benefits. This, in return, gives Texas and southern states competitive edges against more progressive states.

And as we are seeing in the news lately, the southern states are extremely religious and are willing to lose jobs and waste hours debating gender identity than budget deficits. My home state of WV is also in terrible financial shape but they spent a majority of time passing legislation for gun right laws while the state debt is crippling the future and heroin epidemic is rampant. The priorities are backwards and businesses are starting to realize that some of these states may not be the best states when trying to attract the top talents.

As a gay man who really isn't outlandish with my sexuality, just seeing a gay or lesbian couple holding hands on the street makes me feel accepted here. I was astonished and felt so relaxed. Doing that in the south, it's hard to tell what could happen. I hate the winters but decided an open society allowing me to be who I am was worth a few could months.

Please forgive my awful grammar and maybe incoherent sentences at times. I'm on my phone and it's almost midnight ... Getting sleepy But love reading all sides of this issue! Everyone does provide great points
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Old 05-03-2016, 09:33 AM
 
10,265 posts, read 5,934,396 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Flyguy2016 View Post

As a gay man who really isn't outlandish with my sexuality, just seeing a gay or lesbian couple holding hands on the street makes me feel accepted here. I was astonished and felt so relaxed. Doing that in the south, it's hard to tell what could happen. I hate the winters but decided an open society allowing me to be who I am was worth a few could months.

Please forgive my awful grammar and maybe incoherent sentences at times. I'm on my phone and it's almost midnight ... Getting sleepy But love reading all sides of this issue! Everyone does provide great points
Since you brought up Texas, there's a fairly active, poll-driven, thread on cd's city-vs-city that's Houston vs Philly. Last time I looked Philly was winning that poll. You might find the conversation there interesting.

And, FYI, there are, besides you, four other openly gay posters(that I'm aware of) on this board. One is married and moved(retired) to Philadelphia from Houston. He,and his husband, saw no reason what-so-ever to remain in Houston.
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Old 05-16-2016, 10:36 AM
 
1,442 posts, read 1,904,545 times
Reputation: 1172
I believe Philly will have many more gentrified and lively areas than now, but that's going to be the case for most cities in the country 20 years from now, especially for dense and walkable cities with good bones. The thing that would be interesting to see is how the Philadelphia metro area will be affected by the progress in the nearby DC and NYC metro areas.
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Old 05-16-2016, 11:22 PM
 
283 posts, read 366,892 times
Reputation: 314
Well this certainly bodes well.

http://www.philly.com/philly/busines...ome_sales.html
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