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Old 05-12-2016, 10:58 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
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By "cosmopolitan," some people mean the dictionary definition, which means "including people from many different countries." By that standard, I'd say it's not all that cosmopolitan since Philly doesn't have a very large foreign born population.

When others (most, really) say "cosmopolitan," they are really talking about wealth, style, glamour and sophistication. I'd say Philly has that in spots. More than Pittsburgh or Cleveland but less than DC or NYC.
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Old 05-16-2016, 04:11 AM
 
Location: Midwest
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
By "cosmopolitan," some people mean the dictionary definition, which means "including people from many different countries." By that standard, I'd say it's not all that cosmopolitan since Philly doesn't have a very large foreign born population.

When others (most, really) say "cosmopolitan," they are really talking about wealth, style, glamour and sophistication. I'd say Philly has that in spots. More than Pittsburgh or Cleveland but less than DC or NYC.
This thread is a lot less confusing now. I was having a really hard time figuring out how Philadelphia was cosmopolitan but my hometown of Queens wasn't.

It's because cosmopolitan means something different than it actually means and I wasn't aware of it.
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Old 05-16-2016, 08:36 AM
 
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This is the definition I've seen:

familiar with and at ease in many different countries and cultures.
"his knowledge of French, Italian, and Spanish made him genuinely cosmopolitan"
synonyms: worldly, worldly-wise, well travelled, experienced, unprovincial, cultivated, cultured, sophisticated, suave, urbane, glamorous, fashionable, stylish; More


Being familiar with and at ease with many different countries and cultures does speak to sophistication in some sense. And while there are provincial areas of people from many different cultures, they can still be very narrow in acceptance.

And as listed, the synonyms play on the fringe such as "cultured", "glamorous", "fashionable", "stylish", "well travelled", "worldy". I don't think that makes the definition too far outside of the boundaries of the earlier discussion.

And that being said, Center City meets the criteria for the most part. Areas of University city as well?
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Old 05-16-2016, 11:05 AM
 
Location: Midwest
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Originally Posted by AJNEOA View Post
This is the definition I've seen:

And that being said, Center City meets the criteria for the most part. Areas of University city as well?
Probably - yet the vast majority of transplants in greater Center City are just educated people from the metro area, I would imagine. I also think that the kind of common local boosterism often coming specifically from the people who think of Philadelphia as an exceptionally sophisticated place runs against the grain of true cosmopolitanism (this exists in other places too, notably with transplants to NYC).

And even taking Greater Center City to it's maximum geographic boundaries, it's still a pretty tiny part of the population of Philadelphia the city, let alone the metro area.

For the record, I think that Philadelphia, like most cities, has both traits. Common folk are provincial - and Philadelphia has mostly common folk - as does anywhere in the world. Common folk are able to bring a lot of different experiences to the table though and when they mingle and share ideas, especially in the kind of numbers that exist in large cities like Philadelphia, the outcome can be cosmopolitan. It doesn't have to be glamorous in my mind though.

At least that's more what I had in mind than Stephen Starr or the 13th Street Ladies opening yet another ethnic knock off restaurant, or a mall store opening on Walnut Street, or a theater hosting the same plays and musicians that tour all around the country. Just like views from the highway, bad neighborhoods, and scumbags aren't what make us provincial either.
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Old 05-16-2016, 11:35 AM
 
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Originally Posted by FamousBlueRaincoat View Post
Probably - yet the vast majority of transplants in greater Center City are just educated people from the metro area, I would imagine. I also think that the kind of common local boosterism often coming specifically from the people who think of Philadelphia as an exceptionally sophisticated place runs against the grain of true cosmopolitanism (this exists in other places too, notably with transplants to NYC).

And even taking Greater Center City to it's maximum geographic boundaries, it's still a pretty tiny part of the population of Philadelphia the city, let alone the metro area.

For the record, I think that Philadelphia, like most cities, has both traits. Common folk are provincial - and Philadelphia has mostly common folk - as does anywhere in the world. Common folk are able to bring a lot of different experiences to the table though and when they mingle and share ideas, especially in the kind of numbers that exist in large cities like Philadelphia, the outcome can be cosmopolitan. It doesn't have to be glamorous in my mind though.

At least that's more what I had in mind than Stephen Starr or the 13th Street Ladies opening yet another ethnic knock off restaurant, or a mall store opening on Walnut Street, or a theater hosting the same plays and musicians that tour all around the country. Just like views from the highway, bad neighborhoods, and scumbags aren't what make us provincial either.
I don't disagree with a single statement. The only complexity that introduces is that once a place becomes more cosmopolitan, does income rise? And as income rises, does that mean other symptoms show up like mall stores opening on Walnut and ethnic knock-off restaurants? So, while a place can be very cosmopolitan without those traits, do those traits often times accompany a cosmopolitan environment?

If there's good reason to believe the answers to those questions are "yes", then people are probably just basing their opinions on those symptoms.
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