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Old 09-26-2019, 08:19 AM
 
1 posts, read 288 times
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Drexel Hill is Upper Darby Township, so you looking down on Upper Darby shows you do not know the area. The High School for Drexel Hill is Upper Darby High School, unless you want to pay for private to catholic school. Get your facts straight before posting stupid comments.
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Old 09-27-2019, 09:10 AM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
6,220 posts, read 3,054,930 times
Reputation: 3937
Quote:
Originally Posted by ActualUDResident View Post
People tend to refer to that as commercial.

See the thing that a lot of people from that area seem to overlook is that it was largely built up around the same time. That means the infrastructure was as well. Well that now needs to replaced, which costs money. That area peaked in the '70s, has lost its upper class, and has had many people from more working class areas and even Philly move there for the past almost twenty years. They've built very few new upscale housing since then, and every commercial area continues to become less upscale. In short, it's not aging well nor will it age well in the future.

They continue to develop every available square inch with more tract housing or "townhomes" but that also means more money is required for services, and none of that will ever make the property taxes start going down. That ship has sailed.
Channeling Chuck Marohn, I see.
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Old 09-27-2019, 02:53 PM
 
57 posts, read 15,751 times
Reputation: 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarketStEl View Post
Just common sense. I'm not one to think suburbanization was a mistake though. It's the only reason many working and middle class families from the cities could ever likely afford to own land and build something for themselves. They continue to serve that purpose for city people across this country.

Unfortunately, they're the ones who will eventually foot the bill for the aging infrastructure in these postwar suburbs.

That's a much more complex topic for another time though.
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Old 09-28-2019, 04:35 AM
 
Location: Kennett Square, PA
1,782 posts, read 2,753,978 times
Reputation: 2898
[quote=ActualUDResident;56267980]
Quote:
Originally Posted by soulsurv View Post
[b] People tend to refer to that as commercial.

See the thing that a lot of people from that area seem to overlook is that it was largely built up around the same time. That means the infrastructure was as well. Well that now needs to replaced, which costs money. That area peaked in the '70s, has lost its upper class, and has had many people from more working class areas and even Philly move there for the past almost twenty years. They've built very few new upscale housing since then, and every commercial area continues to become less upscale. In short, it's not aging well nor will it age well in the future.

They continue to develop every available square inch with more tract housing or "townhomes" but that also means more money is required for services, and none of that will ever make the property taxes start going down. That ship has sailed.
I see your point. I graduated SHS in 75 when upper, middle & lower were all represented.
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Old 09-30-2019, 01:35 PM
 
Location: Chadds Ford
390 posts, read 171,030 times
Reputation: 396
I believe I've said this on other threads, but Upper Darby will be saved by millenials who can't afford a down payment elsewhere. And while these millennials won't be "rich", they'll mostly be college educated and a net-contributor to the local economy.

And before anyone says millenials are moving into the cities instead, that's no longer accurate. They're starting to have kids and want some extra space.

The biggest hurdle I see in my theory is that lots of houses in the area need updating and millenials are not known for their DIY skills. But considering the age of the houses, a contractor may be needed anyway.
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Old 09-30-2019, 05:21 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia
1,335 posts, read 745,577 times
Reputation: 1348
Quote:
Originally Posted by Patmcpsu View Post
I believe I've said this on other threads, but Upper Darby will be saved by millenials who can't afford a down payment elsewhere. And while these millennials won't be "rich", they'll mostly be college educated and a net-contributor to the local economy.

And before anyone says millenials are moving into the cities instead, that's no longer accurate. They're starting to have kids and want some extra space.

The biggest hurdle I see in my theory is that lots of houses in the area need updating and millenials are not known for their DIY skills. But considering the age of the houses, a contractor may be needed anyway.

Upper Darby really is an attractive area. It has a lot of qualities of Queen's in terms of Philadelphia 'boroughs'.

And you all see how inexpensive that borough is now. 10 years from now I see Upper Darby exploding with growth, as direct subway access makes it a very attractive option for those who want to get to Center City and University City efficiently, with housing still below the 350k mark, which is really the limit of middle-income affordability with current dual-income households on average.
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Old 09-30-2019, 05:39 PM
 
10,279 posts, read 5,943,675 times
Reputation: 3643
Quote:
Originally Posted by Patmcpsu View Post
I believe I've said this on other threads, but Upper Darby will be saved by millenials who can't afford a down payment elsewhere. And while these millennials won't be "rich", they'll mostly be college educated and a net-contributor to the local economy.

And before anyone says millenials are moving into the cities instead, that's no longer accurate. They're starting to have kids and want some extra space.

The biggest hurdle I see in my theory is that lots of houses in the area need updating and millenials are not known for their DIY skills. But considering the age of the houses, a contractor may be needed anyway.
No, it won't be saved by millennials or rather not the ones who are already here and have been here for a little while.

If what you say were true it would have started by now. Mills will not bypass the amenities the majority seem to want by looking at cheaper housing in UD. I live around a ton of millennials with children, more now than ever. These kids are city kids. Kids who are used to walking to Whole Foods or hanging out re alfresco dining with their parents or walking to the PMA when they have kid activities.
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Old 09-30-2019, 05:56 PM
 
10,279 posts, read 5,943,675 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rowhomecity View Post
Upper Darby really is an attractive area. It has a lot of qualities of Queen's in terms of Philadelphia 'boroughs'.

And you all see how inexpensive that borough is now. 10 years from now I see Upper Darby exploding with growth, as direct subway access makes it a very attractive option for those who want to get to Center City and University City efficiently, with housing still below the 350k mark, which is really the limit of middle-income affordability with current dual-income households on average.
The township is huge. And it does matter where you mean when you say "attractive".

I'd love to be wrong, because I remember, and am old enough to know, when 69th St rivaled some parts Center City wrt amenities. And obviously the transit hub helped make it that way. But, a LOT has to happen before hand to do what you are imagining. All you have to do is travel down Long Lane, Marshall Rd or Wycombe Ave to East Lansdowne to see how much needs to happen around there. It's needs investment for sure.
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Old 09-30-2019, 06:01 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia Pa
669 posts, read 454,280 times
Reputation: 659
Quote:
Originally Posted by kyb01 View Post
No, it won't be saved by millennials or rather not the ones who are already here and have been here for a little while.

If what you say were true it would have started by now. Mills will not bypass the amenities the majority seem to want by looking at cheaper housing in UD. I live around a ton of millennials with children, more now than ever. These kids are city kids. Kids who are used to walking to Whole Foods or hanging out re alfresco dining with their parents or walking to the PMA when they have kid activities.
Yeah, agree. The city will have to get insanely cost-prohibitive in a real hurry for millennials to start flocking to UD. Most that I know would much rather roomate-up in the city than live that far removed. If Philly ever gets a strong middle class back down the road, I can see 20/30-somethings seeing the value of home ownership in a close burb like UD.
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Old 10-01-2019, 09:25 AM
 
10,279 posts, read 5,943,675 times
Reputation: 3643
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pennsport View Post
Yeah, agree. The city will have to get insanely cost-prohibitive in a real hurry for millennials to start flocking to UD. Most that I know would much rather roomate-up in the city than live that far removed. If Philly ever gets a strong middle class back down the road, I can see 20/30-somethings seeing the value of home ownership in a close burb like UD.
As I said I would love to be wrong but I truly do not see it.

Once upon a time, close to 69th St, Upper Darby had a Mercedes dealership on Garrett Rd a couple of blocks east of Beverly Hills MS. This was back in the 70s-early 80s. Try to imagine that now. Well...you can't.
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