U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Pennsylvania > Philadelphia
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 04-19-2016, 06:03 PM
 
34 posts, read 58,652 times
Reputation: 12

Advertisements

Drexel Hill seems like the only decent safe neighborhood within 30 mins of downtown that has nice houses for ~ 300k. I drive through it last week and really liked what I saw (well, until you hit Upper Darby ). I asked "Whats the catch?". Everyone said "Schools and property taxes." The schools don't bother me, but I while I realize the property taxes are bad, I want to know: How bad are we talking? I can't seem to find anything anywhere that can flat out give me a cold hard % number. I just want an estimate of what I am looking at paying for a 300k house and need a number % to go off of.

I did some math and even with huge taxes it seems like its still a good buy. A 300k house will cost 450k in just about any other halfway decent neighborhood that close to CC. So you're paying extra property taxes on the remaining 150k difference, plus taking out the extra 150k in loans leading to larger mortgage, as well as needing a higher downpayment. I sort of feel like it evens out. With that said, I think Drexel Hill may have the highest number of foreclosures in Philadelphia area, thus I think a lot of people thought "It evens out" when they bought.

Anyone know of an exact % for the taxes?

Thanks!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-19-2016, 07:32 PM
 
Location: Dude...., I'm right here
1,237 posts, read 798,194 times
Reputation: 731
Well, it's a gamble. A 300K house could end up loosing value and later selling for 200K. Cheap can become cheaper. And you have to think about re-sale value. Homes in good school districts sell fast because you have more buyers looking for good school districts. With RE, it's all about location. If you are going to spend a lot of money, you have to think down the road.

Enter the address of the home on any RE website and you will get the tax information together with all the particulars including it's sales history. I prefer using Zillow which also provides a link to the county assessor's website providing more information including the tax history, etc.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Shikes View Post
Drexel Hill seems like the only decent safe neighborhood within 30 mins of downtown that has nice houses for ~ 300k. I drive through it last week and really liked what I saw (well, until you hit Upper Darby ). I asked "Whats the catch?". Everyone said "Schools and property taxes." The schools don't bother me, but I while I realize the property taxes are bad, I want to know: How bad are we talking? I can't seem to find anything anywhere that can flat out give me a cold hard % number. I just want an estimate of what I am looking at paying for a 300k house and need a number % to go off of.

I did some math and even with huge taxes it seems like its still a good buy. A 300k house will cost 450k in just about any other halfway decent neighborhood that close to CC. So you're paying extra property taxes on the remaining 150k difference, plus taking out the extra 150k in loans leading to larger mortgage, as well as needing a higher downpayment. I sort of feel like it evens out. With that said, I think Drexel Hill may have the highest number of foreclosures in Philadelphia area, thus I think a lot of people thought "It evens out" when they bought.

Anyone know of an exact % for the taxes?

Thanks!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-19-2016, 09:53 PM
 
48 posts, read 89,051 times
Reputation: 134
It is worth noting based on an earlier post that Drexel Hill is a section of Upper Darby Township; it is a separate census-taking district, however, with a separate zip code, as well. Just for sake of clarification.

As in many communities, there are all kinds of implicit comments in things people say about communities on forums like this and in having discussions with people in person about these things. In Drexel Hill's case, it is in the Upper Darby school district, which in the last 15 years has developed a reputation that is wobblier than it once was because clearly the student body demographics are racially and economically diversifying away from working and middle class white, long the vast majority of who called the township home. The township is about 50% white currently, while the Drexel Hill section is probably about 75% white now. Both figures are declining while Asian and also African American figures are increasing. The Philadelphia area is largely hyper-segregated racially and Upper Darby Township is no exception. So one finds a murmuring in Drexel Hill that things are "going down" etc. I firmly believe people make assumptions about race and culture before knowing anything else - or have I been hallucinating about what people have said to me over the years?

Drexel Hill bears a great deal of the township's overall obscenely high property tax levy on top of Delaware County's property taxes which are among the higher taxes of all the suburban counties around Philadelphia on the PA side. Oddly, however, some areas that are nice in Drexel Hill may have fine homes with $7500 taxes, while two blocks away similarly priced homes with similar qualities have $11,000-$12,000 taxes per year. Drexel Hill residents are quite aware of this problem and the solution based upon taking a ride around seems to be moving out. Lots of housing for sale and lots of homes staying on the market a long time in recent years with stagnant prices. For families with kids bent on public schools, Haverford Township across Route 1 is a common destination, though one pays more for a house to have slightly lower property taxes (for now).

Upper Darby's part-time government structure cannot effectively manage the challenges facing what is really a "city" of almost 80,000. That "city" increasingly faces growing poverty, crime, and a host of issues for which it was not set-up originally. Part of that legacy has been allowing tax rates to reach nosebleed levels, and this is crippling the massive potential that this walkable, transit-oriented, classic suburb has going for it.

Drexel Hill is a good place to live in many ways, still. The perception of elementary and even DH middle school is relatively good still and I can attest from a number of friends whose kids attend the high school that it, too, still offers much that is good to students there. (It is worth noting that irrespective of school reputations, DH has long had and continues to have a large Catholic school population). But the taxes are painful compared to even other nearby townships - though I would say that on the whole all of Delaware County has rising property taxes that are noticeably higher than similar communities in Chester or Montgomery Counties.

In the end it has to be about where you like, the house you like, and your own feeling of security irrespective of what anyone else has to say. If you like DH enough to but a great house and not mind paying a mortgage that is potentially equal to the monthly tax bill for the house, do it. The area needs people intending to stay and invest, that is for sure.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-20-2016, 08:36 AM
 
883 posts, read 529,901 times
Reputation: 1223
I don't know the actual millage rate, but you can probably find that easily enough on the UD Township website. That said, I am currently trying to sell a twin in the Havertown section of UD Township (a few streets right on the other side of Route 1, before it switches to Drexel Hill), and for my 3-bedroom, 1 bath, 1,152 square foot twin, taxes are over $5,000 a year. Some of the gorgeous single Tudors in Drexel Hill have taxes above $10,000 a year.


Also, some real estate websites will show you what taxes were on a particular house for the last calendar year.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-23-2016, 06:55 AM
 
Location: Kennett Square, PA
1,782 posts, read 2,752,075 times
Reputation: 2898
Always loved Drexel Hill! Never understood why places with an abundance of industry, i.e., Springfield, have climbing obscene tax rates when industry is supposed to temper taxes . Can someone explain that to me?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-25-2016, 02:01 PM
 
37 posts, read 46,496 times
Reputation: 29
Last year's millage rates:

http://www.co.delaware.pa.us/treasurer/TaxRate2015.pdf

Upper Darby
County: 5.6040
Township: 19.9200
School District: 35.2160

Total: 60.7400

(On the appraised value, not the sale value)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-26-2016, 12:27 AM
 
Location: SW Florida
4,613 posts, read 6,269,835 times
Reputation: 7809
I love the homes in Drexel Hill. But as I was driving through a few years ago, I did notice a lot of for-sale signs. Anyway, my friend's small Tudor took a long time to sell, I think his taxes were $8K. And I don't think he had central air. Even if I could afford the taxes, I think I'd be leery of buying in a neighborhood that's on the downswing. The homes, while beautiful, are not getting any younger and the taxes aren't getting any cheaper and the school district's not getting any better. So what has to give? The price of the home....and as a crowd moves in who can only afford to pay the lower prices, the neighborhood can start to get a little seedy.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-26-2016, 08:42 AM
 
883 posts, read 529,901 times
Reputation: 1223
Quote:
Originally Posted by Avalon08 View Post
I love the homes in Drexel Hill. But as I was driving through a few years ago, I did notice a lot of for-sale signs. Anyway, my friend's small Tudor took a long time to sell, I think his taxes were $8K. And I don't think he had central air. Even if I could afford the taxes, I think I'd be leery of buying in a neighborhood that's on the downswing. The homes, while beautiful, are not getting any younger and the taxes aren't getting any cheaper and the school district's not getting any better. So what has to give? The price of the home....and as a crowd moves in who can only afford to pay the lower prices, the neighborhood can start to get a little seedy.

You have just described what I'm going through trying to sell my twin.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-01-2016, 11:48 AM
 
Location: Drexel Hill/Lansdowne
299 posts, read 801,570 times
Reputation: 161
To be honest, the "white flight" is crazy over here.

I just want to know where everyone is going. bucks county, maybe?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-01-2016, 04:08 PM
 
54 posts, read 58,726 times
Reputation: 16
Probably not Bucks not rather Chesco or other parts of delco
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Pennsylvania > Philadelphia
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top