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Old 06-13-2016, 10:10 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
27,267 posts, read 25,865,265 times
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You didn't read the thread.
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Old 06-14-2016, 07:28 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia
2 posts, read 1,431 times
Reputation: 10
How embatrassing, I actually had no idea about that!
Thank you for the information.
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Old 06-14-2016, 12:22 PM
 
633 posts, read 491,807 times
Reputation: 1109
Quote:
Originally Posted by ksqdomer View Post
Actually they really don't make very much for the state. As a matter of fact for the first time in their audit last year they had to add their medical and pension liability like any other business and they are 240 million in the red. That 80 million transfer will shrink quickly. They exist currently as a patronage jobs program backed by the UFCW union.

This isn't accurate. The PLCB is profitable and nowhere near $240 million in the red.


Quote:
Release of the year-end financials was delayed this year due to new pension liability reporting changes effective for all government employers this year as required by the Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB), as well as workers’ compensation actuarial valuation changes. These changes, along with increases in the commonwealth’s other post-employment benefit liabilities, required additional time for the Office of the Budget and the Comptroller to finalize year-end financial statements and may cause delays in future years.


For the year ending June 30, 2015, the PLCB’s pension obligation was determined to be $362.7 million, 2.9 percent of the state’s total unfunded pension liability of $12.3 billion.


In addition to requiring the PLCB to record its share of the commonwealth’s unfunded pension liability, GASB #68 also requires that annual changes in the liability and other actuarial assumptions be reflected against the fund’s net income. State Employee Retirement System actuaries determine these adjustments after the close of the fiscal year. A charge of $16.8 million was recorded to the PLCB’s net income for fiscal year 2014-15 as a result of this new GASB reporting requirement.


The commonwealth is self-insured for workers’ compensation benefits. In 2014, a new method for determining agencies’ contribution rates – one that relies more heavily on each agency’s actual claims experience and requires every agency to contribute more to build up reserves – was implemented across the commonwealth. This change doubled the PLCB’s workers’ compensation expenses.
Additionally, the commonwealth’s new insurance examiner determined the commonwealth as a whole had been insufficiently contributing to its self-funded workers’ compensation liability and increased the total liability for the fund by $160.5 million to $861 million.


The combination of workers’ compensation changes resulted in a $19.4 million increase in workers’ compensation accrued expense for fiscal year 2014-15.




The commonwealth’s total costs for funding retirees’ medical benefits were $341 million for fiscal year 2014-15, and the PLCB’s portion of that expense was $13 million.


The net impact of all three benefit accounting and reporting changes, all outside the PLCB’s control, totals a $49.2 million reduction in net income. As a result, net income for the year totaled $83.6 million, down $40.1 million from the prior year.
http://fox43.com/2015/10/28/pennsylv...-year-2014-15/

Net income for the PLCB *after* adjustments for pension liability, workers compensation increases, and medical benefits was 83.6 million in the black- which goes to the general fund. This does not include the $334 Million in liquor taxes or $130 million in state sales taxes which also goes to the state.


Do you people just make things up as you go along?
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Old 06-16-2016, 07:24 PM
 
1,953 posts, read 3,357,867 times
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Agree with the posters above saying that the postal addresses crossing multiple municipalities in PA is very confusing. You don't see that as much in South Jersey. There are a couple exceptions, such as Sicklerville as one example. But overall, you don't have the giant cluster of what seems like overlapping names like you do in lower Bucks.

Trying to figure out this map is painful:
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Old 06-17-2016, 03:36 AM
 
Location: The place where the road & the sky collide
23,169 posts, read 28,586,554 times
Reputation: 9566
Quote:
Originally Posted by soug View Post
Agree with the posters above saying that the postal addresses crossing multiple municipalities in PA is very confusing. You don't see that as much in South Jersey. There are a couple exceptions, such as Sicklerville as one example. But overall, you don't have the giant cluster of what seems like overlapping names like you do in lower Bucks.

Trying to figure out this map is painful:
There have been more postal adjustments in South Jersey, but phone exchanges are more telling of the postal chaos that used to be there. Take Cherry Hill. . .The township used to be Delaware Township. Delaware Township was divided between Haddonfield & Maple Shade for postal delivery & phone service, even though Delaware Township was a functioning township.
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Old 06-18-2016, 12:50 PM
 
Location: Levittown
764 posts, read 581,218 times
Reputation: 442
Quote:
Originally Posted by soug View Post
Agree with the posters above saying that the postal addresses crossing multiple municipalities in PA is very confusing. You don't see that as much in South Jersey. There are a couple exceptions, such as Sicklerville as one example. But overall, you don't have the giant cluster of what seems like overlapping names like you do in lower Bucks.

Trying to figure out this map is painful:
Yup, gotta love wikipedia for that one! Apparently there is even more that is not included here. I don't see Andalusia or Washington Crossing which are obvious places.

There are a few zcta's that cross several township boundaries on the Camden/Gloucester County line. Sicklerville is supposed to be entirely within Winslow Township AFAIK, but neighboring Gloucester Twp - which is still Camden County - includes an area called Erial which uses the same zip code, as well as a small portion of Washington in Gloucester County, namely the Fairmount development behind the car dealership on 42 as I used to know people who lived there, but I don't know if this immediate area has a name or anything.

Turnersville which is the bulk of Washington Twp has the same zip code as the Blackwood section of Gloucester Twp. And I think the rest of Washington uses the Sewell zip code and I think the area is called Hurffville, but Sewell is officially part of Mantua.
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Old 06-24-2016, 02:37 PM
 
Location: University City, Philadelphia
22,632 posts, read 12,789,064 times
Reputation: 15763
Quote:
Originally Posted by jman07 View Post

The mummers are weird.
No, they're not.

They are mostly working class boozy straight guys who secretly wanna be drag queens.
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Old 06-25-2016, 01:41 AM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
6,213 posts, read 3,048,381 times
Reputation: 3932
Quote:
Originally Posted by Burger Fan View Post
This isn't true, really. Quakers were long gone (or at least culturally irrelevant and few in number) by the time the PLCB was created. The reason why PA has the liquor set up it does, is because of prohibition. Alcohol was illegal EVERYWHERE until the 21st amendment was passed. PA was one of the states not too happy about alcohol becoming legal across the board (PA was one of the last to ratify the 21st, and did so via a convention that bypassed the state legislature), but was the only one to establish a state run liquor control board to regulate all alcohol sales. Why did it do this?
You answered your own question in the rest of your post: the board was created to make purchasing alcohol difficult. As another poster noted, Gov. Gifford Pinchot was an ardent prohibitionist, and prohibitionist sentiment ran high in parts of the state, especially those that voted for him.

When the PLCB store that's now in the 2000 block of Market was in the 1900 block of Chestnut, it had three replica Philadelphia Inquirer front pages on the wall by the registers. The first announced the start of Prohibition. The second announced its end with the headline, "Prohibition To End Tomorrow; High Prices for Liquor Seen Here." The third had a story explaining where the state liquor stores would be located headlined, "Board Allots Only 10 Stores Here." It went on to explain that those counties and municipalities that voted for Pinchot got unusually generous allotments of state liquor stores while those that did not got few (relative to their population on both counts).

Pennaylvania, however, was not the only state to establish a state alcoholic beverage control board or commission, nor was it the only one to set up a state monopoly on the sale of packaged alcoholic beverages. As recently as 10 years ago, 14 states and two counties in Maryland had government liquor monopolies. Most of these have either eliminated their state-run stores or ended the retail monopoly by allowing private stores alongside the state-run ones. Most of the states that chose the latter path retained a wholesale monopoly, though.
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Old 06-25-2016, 10:28 AM
 
3,118 posts, read 4,466,021 times
Reputation: 2585
So they wanted to make buy alcohol more difficult. Still doesn't explain why you can't buy beer in most liquor stores but can get hard liquor which is viewed as a more hardcore alcohol. The laws are just senseless.
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Old 06-25-2016, 01:56 PM
 
10,273 posts, read 5,934,396 times
Reputation: 3628
Quote:
Originally Posted by jman07 View Post
So they wanted to make buy alcohol more difficult. Still doesn't explain why you can't buy beer in most liquor stores but can get hard liquor which is viewed as a more hardcore alcohol. The laws are just senseless.
Each state (and DC) has different laws wrt the distribution of alcohol. So there are 51 different laws. PA is one of the strictest.
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