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View Poll Results: Do you support the new Soda Tax of 1.5 cents per ounce?
Yes! Keep up the good work! 22 37.29%
No! This tax needs to go the way of the dodo. 37 62.71%
Voters: 59. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 06-20-2016, 01:08 PM
 
7,457 posts, read 7,874,862 times
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It was only a free-association, visceral reaction type of thought. Not meant to hijack the thread….peace.
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Old 06-20-2016, 07:00 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
27,287 posts, read 25,883,626 times
Reputation: 34140
Quote:
Originally Posted by Redraven View Post
I am SO glad tjhat my mother packed us up in 1948 and moved us from Blair County, PA to Yellowstone County, MT.
I will quite likely never go East of the Mississippi again. No, not even to visit the family burial plots in Martinsburg.
I pray that the MT legislators are smart enough to NOT take lessons from the people in power back there...
What a weird statement. You write off half of the states because Philly wants to tax soda? I'm sure that makes sense to you.
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Old 06-21-2016, 10:49 AM
 
Location: Plymouth Meeting, PA.
4,530 posts, read 2,251,464 times
Reputation: 2172
I find that the people championing the soda tax are usually people were money is not an issue.
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Old 06-21-2016, 11:28 AM
 
Location: Montco PA
2,065 posts, read 4,292,195 times
Reputation: 1478
Quote:
Originally Posted by FKD19124 View Post
I find that the people championing the soda tax are usually people were money is not an issue.
Probably true, but to many of the anti-government tea party contingent, money is also not an issue.

My guess is that the people who are affected by this (i.e. people for whom money is an issue) were largely silent because they are too busy, among other things, trying to make ends meet.
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Old 06-21-2016, 01:18 PM
 
Location: Center City
7,087 posts, read 8,218,872 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slambram View Post
Wouldn't the tax be charged at checkout, like sales tax or bottle deposit?
The tax is paid by distributors. In all likelihood, they will absorb some of the increased cost and will not pass all of it onto the end customer. We live in an economically competitive culture.

Besides, people are free to give up sweetened sodas if it strains their budget. Last I heard, such drinks are not one of the essential food groups.
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Old 06-21-2016, 01:32 PM
 
174 posts, read 126,029 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pine to Vine View Post
The tax is paid by distributors. In all likelihood, they will absorb some of the increased cost and will not pass all of it onto the end customer. We live in an economically competitive culture.

Besides, people are free to give up sweetened [and diet] sodas if it strains their budget. Last I heard, such drinks are not one of the essential food groups.
Again, this applies to ALL soda - sweetened and diet. While I agree that nobody needs soda, I think it's important to stop minimizing the depth and scope of this new tax, even if it may be unconscious.
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Old 06-21-2016, 02:18 PM
 
Location: Midwest
1,283 posts, read 1,882,384 times
Reputation: 970
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pine to Vine View Post
The tax is paid by distributors. In all likelihood, they will absorb some of the increased cost and will not pass all of it onto the end customer. We live in an economically competitive culture.

Besides, people are free to give up sweetened sodas if it strains their budget. Last I heard, such drinks are not one of the essential food groups.
I rarely drink soda - basically for the reason you stated. It's wasted money.

A lot of neighborhood stores really only sell soda and junk food. It's one reason I don't shop at too many neighborhood stores in Philly. If I grew up around them though, I'd probably have a lot of soda and junk food. I dunno. The tax really isn't going to affect me much at all - I work up a sweat during work in the summer and don't have A/C so do buy a couple of gatorades throughout the summer. So maybe I'll pay a dollar or two a year towards pre-k and the other things being funded that they're not talking about to keep up their disingenuous ad campaign.

I wouldn't mind the tax much if I thought Philadelphia was serious about fixing itself. Last I heard, the city was still giving out tax abatements to luxury buildings built downtown, tax credits to construction in suburban office parks within city limits (a lot of whom left other, transit-connected parts of the city or in walkable neighborhoods), a pension system that doesn't seem sustainable, a high wage tax, and something like 1/2 billion dollards uncollected property taxes, a high business tax (which shocked me when I moved here and caused me to give up my little side income freelance projects I used to do).

If the candy and cigarette taxes of recent years wind up solving problems than that's just fine with me. In the meantime, while we wait and see what it accomplishes, it does kind of smell of a certain pathetic search for band-aids.

And yet another regressive tax in a state where progressive income taxes are unconstitutional for some reason.
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Old 06-21-2016, 02:41 PM
 
Location: At my house in my state
638 posts, read 761,292 times
Reputation: 672
Im only for it if it lowers other taxes
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Old 06-21-2016, 03:09 PM
 
Location: Center City
7,087 posts, read 8,218,872 times
Reputation: 10154
Quote:
Originally Posted by slambram View Post
Again, this applies to ALL soda - sweetened and diet. While I agree that nobody needs soda, I think it's important to stop minimizing the depth and scope of this new tax, even if it may be unconscious.
Diet sodas are sweetened. I think it's important to stop fear mongering the depth and scope of this new tax, even if it may be unconscious.
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Old 06-21-2016, 03:11 PM
 
Location: Center City
7,087 posts, read 8,218,872 times
Reputation: 10154
Quote:
Originally Posted by FamousBlueRaincoat View Post
I rarely drink soda - basically for the reason you stated. It's wasted money.

A lot of neighborhood stores really only sell soda and junk food. It's one reason I don't shop at too many neighborhood stores in Philly. If I grew up around them though, I'd probably have a lot of soda and junk food. I dunno. The tax really isn't going to affect me much at all - I work up a sweat during work in the summer and don't have A/C so do buy a couple of gatorades throughout the summer. So maybe I'll pay a dollar or two a year towards pre-k and the other things being funded that they're not talking about to keep up their
disingenuous ad campaign.

I wouldn't mind the tax much if I thought Philadelphia was serious about fixing itself. Last I heard, the city was still giving out tax abatements to luxury buildings built downtown, tax credits to construction in suburban office parks within city limits (a lot of whom left other, transit-connected parts of the city or in walkable neighborhoods), a pension system that doesn't seem sustainable, a high wage tax, and something like 1/2 billion dollards uncollected property taxes, a high business tax (which shocked me when I moved here and caused me to give up my little side income freelance projects I used to do).

If the candy and cigarette taxes of recent years wind up solving problems than that's just fine with me. In the meantime, while we wait and see what it accomplishes, it does kind of smell of a certain pathetic search for band-aids.

And yet another regressive tax in a state where progressive income taxes are unconstitutional for some reason.
It's easy to sit and throw potshots. I am happy the mayor and city council are taking some steps to address the city's problems.
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