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View Poll Results: Do you support the new Soda Tax of 1.5 cents per ounce?
Yes! Keep up the good work! 22 37.29%
No! This tax needs to go the way of the dodo. 37 62.71%
Voters: 59. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 06-17-2016, 04:36 AM
 
Location: Atlanta
4,444 posts, read 4,795,124 times
Reputation: 3357

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I see that Philly has passed a 1.5-cent per ounce soda tax to take effect Jan 1.

Personally, I think it's tragic, since this will primarily hurt the poor. Sure, the middle and wealthy folks will be able to dart across the city limits to load up on sweetened beverages, but the car-less city folks will be stuck doing without or paying through the nose. We'll see singles of beer and 4Loko selling for less than non-alcoholic beverages in the local corner store.

Is this what the good people of Philadelphia really want?

Although I don't live there, I'm fearful this could embolden other greedy politicians to pass soda taxes of their own if the one in Philly sticks. I'm rooting for the beverage industry in their efforts to sue the city into oblivion in order to get this tax reversed.

Anyhow, I'd like to see what you guys think. Yay or Nay on the Soda Tax?

Thanks for voting.
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Old 06-17-2016, 05:06 AM
 
Location: Montco PA
2,065 posts, read 4,291,602 times
Reputation: 1478
Given that you're from Atlanta, and given your stance on this issue, do you happen to work for Coca-Cola?

As a city, Philadelphia is often told by the politicians in Harrisburg to "find a way to figure out your own problems because you aren't getting more money from us." This is one such way I guess.

The interesting thing is that Philadelphia is home to high wage and business taxes, and a high sales tax and now a high soda/drink tax, but very low real estate taxes. If those real estate taxes were raised, that would also hurt much of the poor, at least in the short term.

There was a decent-sounding plan to raise the commercial real estate tax rate but lower the wage tax; however Neanderthal City Council President Darryl Clarke (who seems intent on keeping others' good ideas from coming to light while simultaneously not offering any of his own good ideas) didn't like that plan so essentially killed it.

I was actually hoping they'd tax beer, too. Broaden the base but make the rate even lower, like 1 cent or even 0.75 cents per ounce.

I didn't vote in the poll because I don't live in the city. One thing no one is talking about is that better-funded rec centers might, over time, push down costs for police services, as more good kids stuck in bad areas have better outlets. At least in theory I hope that happens.
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Old 06-17-2016, 05:19 AM
 
Location: Atlanta
4,444 posts, read 4,795,124 times
Reputation: 3357
I don't work for Coca-Cola, although I'm now a huge fan of that company. Perhaps I'll buy some of their stock to give them my support.

That's the thing - once they get the idea they can tax "unhealthy" foods - what's to stop them for taxing everything else in sight that people find yummy? Burgers? Tax them! They're fattening. Let's slap a dollar a stick on butter - that leads to obesity too. Heck, restaurants in general should be taxed for offering those large portions that people crave. Two dollars a plate sounds about right, no, we should make it $5 - to really rake in the cash.

And don't think for a moment that these asshats at City Hall will actually use that money for what they say they're gonna use it for - and you can bet they'll be coming back to the trough for more.

If they ever try such a thing in the ATL due to the "success" of the Philly tax, I'm going to wage holy hell along with my friends from Coca-Cola. This madness needs to stop NOW.
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Old 06-17-2016, 05:43 AM
 
12,768 posts, read 28,910,937 times
Reputation: 7341
I guess I see it similar to the taxes on cigarettes - things that don't affect me because I don't buy them. There's probably the same amount as sugar in lemonade or ice tea, as there is in soda, so while they aren't much better for me, those are my preferred summer beverages. I don't buy anything in single serve containers and soda is just not appealing.
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Old 06-17-2016, 05:46 AM
 
10,279 posts, read 5,943,675 times
Reputation: 3643
Quote:
Originally Posted by NorthStarDelight View Post
I see that Philly has passed a 1.5-cent per ounce soda tax to take effect Jan 1.

Personally, I think it's tragic, since this will primarily hurt the poor. Sure, the middle and wealthy folks will be able to dart across the city limits to load up on sweetened beverages, but the car-less city folks will be stuck doing without or paying through the nose. We'll see singles of beer and 4Loko selling for less than non-alcoholic beverages in the local corner store.

Is this what the good people of Philadelphia really want?

Although I don't live there, I'm fearful this could embolden other greedy politicians to pass soda taxes of their own if the one in Philly sticks. I'm rooting for the beverage industry in their efforts to sue the city into oblivion in order to get this tax reversed.

Anyhow, I'd like to see what you guys think. Yay or Nay on the Soda Tax?

Thanks for voting.
Since you are, supposedly, in Atlanta I bet you work for Coca Cola or its advertising agency The timing of this post would kind of indicate that you have a suspicious agenda.
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Old 06-17-2016, 05:47 AM
 
Location: Beautiful Niagara Falls ON.
10,019 posts, read 10,923,156 times
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I wish the entire country would put a huge tax on soda pop. Equal at least to the tax on booze. It's a product that is bad for us has no benefits at all and is a big part of the obesity problem we are now seeing.
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Old 06-17-2016, 06:01 AM
 
Location: Mount Laurel
4,177 posts, read 9,642,473 times
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The premise that it will be healthier for the people and will pay for some education programs is good but until we see where these money really goes, I am skeptical that this is just another way for the city to get money to support other programs.
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Old 06-17-2016, 06:09 AM
 
10,279 posts, read 5,943,675 times
Reputation: 3643
Quote:
Originally Posted by NorthStarDelight View Post
I don't work for Coca-Cola, although I'm now a huge fan of that company. Perhaps I'll buy some of their stock to give them my support.

That's the thing - once they get the idea they can tax "unhealthy" foods - what's to stop them for taxing everything else in sight that people find yummy? Burgers? Tax them! They're fattening. Let's slap a dollar a stick on butter - that leads to obesity too. Heck, restaurants in general should be taxed for offering those large portions that people crave. Two dollars a plate sounds about right, no, we should make it $5 - to really rake in the cash.

And don't think for a moment that these asshats at City Hall will actually use that money for what they say they're gonna use it for - and you can bet they'll be coming back to the trough for more.

If they ever try such a thing in the ATL due to the "success" of the Philly tax, I'm going to wage holy hell along with my friends from Coca-Cola. This madness needs to stop NOW.
There was quite a cry of , "It will kill our businesses!", when Philadelphia passed anti-smoking legislation wrt bars/taverns. Guess what? It didn't kill much. And the restaurant scene, which nominally includes bars, is stronger than ever in the city and surrounding communities. For people, like me, who don't smoke it allowed some of us to patronize places we hadn't in a while or never had before.

So, yes, while it's different than smoking bans but our soda/sugary drink tax will likely embolden other places to try it. Fine by me.
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Old 06-17-2016, 07:46 AM
 
633 posts, read 492,096 times
Reputation: 1109
Quote:
Originally Posted by NorthStarDelight View Post
I see that Philly has passed a 1.5-cent per ounce soda tax to take effect Jan 1.

Personally, I think it's tragic, since this will primarily hurt the poor.

This is a BS argument, for a number of reasons. If money is a concern the poor are free to simply NOT buy sugar laden beverages and pick up a substitute like water or milk. The poor are also by FAR the hardest hit by obesity issues (the paradox of terrible food being quite cheap, soda in particular) so in the long run the reduction in healthcare costs and issues will save them money, not cost them more.


Quote:
Sure, the middle and wealthy folks will be able to dart across the city limits to load up on sweetened beverages

literally no one does this, as we've seen with the rise in the Philadelphia sales tax (8% vs. 6% in the burbs) and the Philadelphia cigarette tax, and the Philadelphia smoking ban. Hell, Delaware has a whopping 0% sales tax on all items and very few people bother to make the drive to shop there over the city unless they're literally on the border. You'll lose more in time and gasoline than you would save attempting to evade the soda tax.


Quote:
but the car-less city folks will be stuck doing without or paying through the nose. We'll see singles of beer and 4Loko selling for less than non-alcoholic beverages in the local corner store.

oh wait, you're serious? let me laugh even harder. Not only does the state of PA tax the ever loving crap out of alcohol,


Malt Beverage and Liquor Tax


the city has a 10% tax on liquor on top of THAT.


City of Philadelphia: Liquor Tax


There is no possible scenario where "singles of beer and 4loko" would ever sell for less than non alcoholic beverages. None. Zero. And as for "corner stores selling singles" that situation is fairly rare here. You cannot simply wander into any old Wawa or 7-11 and buy beer for carry out, that requires a specific license and most "corner stores" don't have this ability- and virtually NO grocery stores within city limits do. Do some? yes. is it the majority? Absolutely not.

Quote:
Although I don't live there

you don't say.


Quote:
I'm rooting for the beverage industry

This is my "surprised" face. Go shill somewhere else. The reality here is that the overwhelming majority of the city realizes that the benefits for funding universal Pre-K are OVERWHELMINGLY positive. Childcare is ludicrously expensive and universal pre-K will save the average parent far more per year than they'd spend on a soda tax. It will also free up adults to re-enter the workforce instead of staying home, so employers have a more mobile, flexible pool of workers to choose from. In the long run children who get comprehensive pre-K outperform those that don't, and we'll be looking at higher graduation rates and lower incarceration- which means taxpayers are shelling out less for our overstuffed prisons.


There is literally no downside here- unless you're a shill for the beverage industry more concerned about shareholder profits than you are about the welfare of a city and its citizens.
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Old 06-17-2016, 08:18 AM
 
Location: Montco PA
2,065 posts, read 4,291,602 times
Reputation: 1478
Quote:
Originally Posted by NorthStarDelight View Post
That's the thing - once they get the idea they can tax "unhealthy" foods - what's to stop them for taxing everything else in sight that people find yummy? Burgers? Tax them! They're fattening. Let's slap a dollar a stick on butter - that leads to obesity too. Heck, restaurants in general should be taxed for offering those large portions that people crave. Two dollars a plate sounds about right, no, we should make it $5 - to really rake in the cash.
If any of these ideas ever happen, come back here and tell me "I told you so," but until then, I don't think so.



And yes, now that all eyes are on the city and the mayor, you can be sure that rec centers and parks are going to get their funding. It's not just Philadelphia area people that are watching this issue.
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