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Old 07-06-2016, 07:38 AM
 
656 posts, read 306,487 times
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So my cousin is looking into relocating from NYC to philly and i think they would do well in No Libs. I'been showing her places and she loves them but always comes back with how bad the schools are rated.

Our daughter is in college so we never really thought twice about the school stuff.

What do people do about this if the schools do, in fact, rate poorly? I ask about No Libs specifically but its really a universal question about philly as a whole.

Are there other areas of town with notably better school situations that are similiar to No Libs in terms of cost/vibe/location to CC?

They're late 30s with a 2 year old. He is a banker and she works on broadway as a costume designer. She'll be making the trip to NYC a couple of times a week and he'll most likely work near City Hall.

Thanks all
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Old 07-06-2016, 04:51 PM
 
10,265 posts, read 5,934,396 times
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Originally Posted by Redddog View Post
So my cousin is looking into relocating from NYC to philly and i think they would do well in No Libs. I'been showing her places and she loves them but always comes back with how bad the schools are rated.

Our daughter is in college so we never really thought twice about the school stuff.

What do people do about this if the schools do, in fact, rate poorly? I ask about No Libs specifically but its really a universal question about philly as a whole.

Are there other areas of town with notably better school situations that are similiar to No Libs in terms of cost/vibe/location to CC?

They're late 30s with a 2 year old. He is a banker and she works on broadway as a costume designer. She'll be making the trip to NYC a couple of times a week and he'll most likely work near City Hall.

Thanks all
All I can say is many of the TONS of pre-school kids in Fairmount may end up in the elementary school there, Bache-Martin. Fairmount has been fine for years and it's even better now. They could try University City's S. Alexander but being in the catchment doesn't guarantee entry nowadays. There's Meredith in S. philly. And Greenfield in western Center City.

I would think that your friends are a bit old for the majority demographic in NoLibs, btw.
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Old 07-07-2016, 06:18 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia, PA
288 posts, read 161,897 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Redddog View Post
So my cousin is looking into relocating from NYC to philly and i think they would do well in No Libs. I'been showing her places and she loves them but always comes back with how bad the schools are rated.

Our daughter is in college so we never really thought twice about the school stuff.

What do people do about this if the schools do, in fact, rate poorly? I ask about No Libs specifically but its really a universal question about philly as a whole.

Are there other areas of town with notably better school situations that are similiar to No Libs in terms of cost/vibe/location to CC?

They're late 30s with a 2 year old. He is a banker and she works on broadway as a costume designer. She'll be making the trip to NYC a couple of times a week and he'll most likely work near City Hall.

Thanks all
My wife and I moved to Fishtown in May, in the Adaire catchment. We plan on having kids and sending them to Adaire. Yes, practically all the schools are rated bad, but I strongly suggest looking beyond just the numbers - visit the elem school's "Friends of [school]" website or page on fb (just search the school name and it should show up) or go to an event related to it. We went to a happy hour fundraiser/meet the neighbors for Friends of Adaire hosted at Fette Sau back in January and saw lots of good kids, parents, and energy from them. This gave us confidence in the school itself; the parents, kids, and staff seem energetic and involved and devoted to the well-being of the school. So do look past the numbers, because they don't capture the things you would get to experience in person.
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Old 07-07-2016, 11:13 AM
 
3,063 posts, read 2,637,611 times
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The schools are bad. In fact, the majority of public schools in the city of Philadelphia school district are horrible. I actually took a few classes where we spoke in depth about the issue(I also went to school board meetings to investigate). What I found strange is that there are quite a few lists that rate Northern Liberties and other areas with similar demographics as having good quality public schools. The "good quality" is relative. If you go by greatschools or read the Philadelphia Public School notebook, you will raise your eyebrows at the number of underperforming, underfunded, and poor quality public schools even in the nice neighborhoods in the city of Philadelphia. This alone will have you second guess the decision to send your child to these schools knowing the stats(once you know them). I know that for myself, after taking the courses I did where we discussed the issues in the public schools, attending various school board meetings, and doing research on the public schools in Philly I don't have anything positive to say about the schools. In fact I'd tell any parent that wants their kids to go to a reputable high quality public school that no matter how the schools "feel" when you visit, and how wonderful and diverse the schools, teachers, and curriculum appears to be--that the public schools are not going to prepare your child as adequately as other public schools in highly rated districts, and that you should be very concerned and pay attention to the numbers, as well as other things that factor into quality education.

That being said, if your friend is dead-set on that area--what people typically try to do in the city district, when they really don't want their kids to go to public school--is Charter, or Magnet schools. There are some great Charter Schools and Magnet schools, but they involve a lottery program which means there's no guarantee for admission. There are a lot of mediocre, or poor performing charter schools as well--so you'll have to do your research. I'm not a fan of Charter schools either, but they are the step up from the public schools. What parents that have money do-is they just send their kids to private schools. This would be the option I'd recommend--if your friend wants to say in the Northern Liberties area and wants their child to get the best education possible. There are some private schools that offer financial aid--but be prepared to spend a pretty penny.

If private school can't be afforded, and you don't want to bank on Charter or other schools that involve the luck of the lottery system, and they are concerned about school performance(and they should be for MANY reasons)--I'd say that the friend should consider another area. There are places that are somewhat close to the city that offer good public schools(mainly the mainline)--Ardmore, Media, etc.

Good luck!
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Old 07-07-2016, 01:53 PM
 
10,265 posts, read 5,934,396 times
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Originally Posted by Faith2187 View Post
The schools are bad. In fact, the majority of public schools in the city of Philadelphia school district are horrible. I actually took a few classes where we spoke in depth about the issue(I also went to school board meetings to investigate). What I found strange is that there are quite a few lists that rate Northern Liberties and other areas with similar demographics as having good quality public schools. The "good quality" is relative. If you go by greatschools or read the Philadelphia Public School notebook, you will raise your eyebrows at the number of underperforming, underfunded, and poor quality public schools even in the nice neighborhoods in the city of Philadelphia. This alone will have you second guess the decision to send your child to these schools knowing the stats(once you know them). I know that for myself, after taking the courses I did where we discussed the issues in the public schools, attending various school board meetings, and doing research on the public schools in Philly I don't have anything positive to say about the schools. In fact I'd tell any parent that wants their kids to go to a reputable high quality public school that no matter how the schools "feel" when you visit, and how wonderful and diverse the schools, teachers, and curriculum appears to be--that the public schools are not going to prepare your child as adequately as other public schools in highly rated districts, and that you should be very concerned and pay attention to the numbers, as well as other things that factor into quality education.

That being said, if your friend is dead-set on that area--what people typically try to do in the city district, when they really don't want their kids to go to public school--is Charter, or Magnet schools. There are some great Charter Schools and Magnet schools, but they involve a lottery program which means there's no guarantee for admission. There are a lot of mediocre, or poor performing charter schools as well--so you'll have to do your research. I'm not a fan of Charter schools either, but they are the step up from the public schools. What parents that have money do-is they just send their kids to private schools. This would be the option I'd recommend--if your friend wants to say in the Northern Liberties area and wants their child to get the best education possible. There are some private schools that offer financial aid--but be prepared to spend a pretty penny.

If private school can't be afforded, and you don't want to bank on Charter or other schools that involve the luck of the lottery system, and they are concerned about school performance(and they should be for MANY reasons)--I'd say that the friend should consider another area. There are places that are somewhat close to the city that offer good public schools(mainly the mainline)--Ardmore, Media, etc.

Good luck!
Did you learn that one reason these schools are underfunded is because of charters ? Did you explore other reasons for underfunding which lie with politicians in Harrisburg ? This is not just a problem created by locals. In fact if the city actually had control, and we could abolish the state controlled, SRC, things might improve.

In any case the other alternative used to be Catholic schools. However with the shrinkage of parishes this is not quite the option it used to be.
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Old 07-08-2016, 09:24 AM
 
3,063 posts, read 2,637,611 times
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Originally Posted by kyb01 View Post
Did you learn that one reason these schools are underfunded is because of charters ? Did you explore other reasons for underfunding which lie with politicians in Harrisburg ? This is not just a problem created by locals. In fact if the city actually had control, and we could abolish the state controlled, SRC, things might improve.

In any case the other alternative used to be Catholic schools. However with the shrinkage of parishes this is not quite the option it used to be.
Yup. I learned it all. SRC plays a large role, funding, the way money is being allocated, etc, Charters are businesses and many of the kids that leave Charters fail within the first couple of years after graduating high school--I mean I could go on and on, but to be frank the conclusion is the same: public schools in the city of Philadelphia are horrible. Charters aren't much better. Don't even get me started on the teachers(I interviewed quite a few who had some surprising revelations that aren't publically discussed) I actually wrote an in-depth report on what I discovered and it was honestly gut-wrenching. The truth of the matter is that certain schools are geared toward churning out certain students. If you want your child to be the best, you send them to the best schools so that they have the best opportunities. This is why parents that can afford it, send their kids to private(catholic or a Haverford school type) rather than trusting schools that are apart of a broken horrible system. Had I got a job in the city of Philadelphia, I would not send my child to any of the public schools OR charter schools. I'd send my son to a private school, or move a little outside of the city(and prepare for a commute) and live in Media, Ardmore, etc., that are known for having good public schools. Just my thoughts of course.
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Old 07-08-2016, 09:38 AM
 
10,265 posts, read 5,934,396 times
Reputation: 3628
Quote:
Originally Posted by Faith2187 View Post
Yup. I learned it all. SRC plays a large role, funding, the way money is being allocated, etc, Charters are businesses and many of the kids that leave Charters fail within the first couple of years after graduating high school--I mean I could go on and on, but to be frank the conclusion is the same: public schools in the city of Philadelphia are horrible. Charters aren't much better. Don't even get me started on the teachers(I interviewed quite a few who had some surprising revelations that aren't publically discussed) I actually wrote an in-depth report on what I discovered and it was honestly gut-wrenching. The truth of the matter is that certain schools are geared toward churning out certain students. If you want your child to be the best, you send them to the best schools so that they have the best opportunities. This is why parents that can afford it, send their kids to private(catholic or a Haverford school type) rather than trusting schools that are apart of a broken horrible system. Had I got a job in the city of Philadelphia, I would not send my child to any of the public schools OR charter schools. I'd send my son to a private school, or move a little outside of the city(and prepare for a commute) and live in Media, Ardmore, etc., that are known for having good public schools. Just my thoughts of course.
Here's something even more gut-wrenching for you: my parents decided to move out of West Philly in the early 1950s because of the schools! I never went to any Philly public schools but my older sister did. I'm a poc in case that info got lost in some posts on this board.
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Old 07-08-2016, 10:16 AM
 
656 posts, read 306,487 times
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A poc?
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Old 07-08-2016, 10:41 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Redddog View Post
A poc?
Person/people of color. I do identify as AA although I'm mixed racially.
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Old 07-08-2016, 10:55 AM
 
3,063 posts, read 2,637,611 times
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Originally Posted by kyb01 View Post
Here's something even more gut-wrenching for you: my parents decided to move out of West Philly in the early 1950s because of the schools! I never went to any Philly public schools but my older sister did. I'm a poc in case that info got lost in some posts on this board.
I am a POC too--which is why it is even more imperative to make sure my son gets the best education.
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