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Old 05-30-2017, 07:41 PM
 
5,721 posts, read 5,057,497 times
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Phoenix has a way better cost of living index doesn't it? As in what the average rent is and so on, in relation to salaries. I've only been in the airport there but from what I've read it seems like a good city if you don't mind that type of landscape.

Quote:
Originally Posted by FrankInPhilly View Post
and thus the thread is hijacked ...
Wow yeah I just noticed that, it didn't even last 2 pages.

Last edited by wanderlust76; 05-30-2017 at 07:50 PM..
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Old 05-31-2017, 03:33 AM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
8,249 posts, read 4,031,854 times
Reputation: 5351
Quote:
Originally Posted by AJNEOA View Post
Do you believe there is any relevance to a place being low density and characteristically non-neighborly? I believe that low density pushes people far enough apart to invite division and cause neighbors to lose touch. Both from a personal level and a societal level. An urban city puts us all more in touch with one another, both those who we would choose to be close with and those that we would not choose. Almost any worthwhile city I've ever visited has had a culture and layout that invites the opposite of low density.

People are social beings. They thrive on positive interactions, and they learn from negative ones (they learn from both obviously). We may seek an ideal, safe, quiet life, but we often tire of its slow pace and get bored. Philly is a much larger city in mostly every way, not that larger is better. But, Phoenix can't compare when it comes to CITY.
I think that maybe more important than the density - though there is such a thing as too little of it - is the arrangement of the various elements that make up the city and its component neighborhoods, and how one might navigate among them.

Is your neighborhood arranged so that, if you so desired, you could walk to a nearby store for milk and bread? Are there many pathways one can follow to the neighborhood shopping district, or the park, or your school? If it is, then you have the basic building blocks of neighborliness, even if your neighborhood's homes are all single-family residences on their own lots.

What I remember from my childhood in KC is playing in the homes (and the backyards) of my neighbors, walking over to the small local supermarket when I was old enough to walk around by myself, and playing in the playground or sledding (in the winter) down the hill at the neighborhood park. Both park and neighborhood shopping district were about three blocks from my house, and I could choose from several streets to take to either thanks to the street grid.

I agree with you that dense urban environments promote the sorts of casual interactions that strengthen community ties - but at the same time, I also note that modern life is such that our social networks are no longer rooted in communities defined by physical proximity to other members. The chorus I sang in draws its members from all over the city and even a few of its suburbs, the traction buffs I socialize with don't live in my neighborhood, and so on. However, having people you run into who do live around you does make you (and them) safer, and if it's not easy to run into them, that feeling of safety will be reduced even if you live in a safe neighborhood.

IOW, it's complicated.
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Old 05-31-2017, 06:55 AM
 
10,789 posts, read 6,581,043 times
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Originally Posted by 1ondoner View Post
When I go to lower Manhattan, I park in Staten Island and take the ferry across. Staten Island is mixed. Some parts are posh, some are not. It actually doesn't feel like New York. I'd say it's better than the other boroughs.
Not surprising that you think Staten Island is the better borough.
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Old 05-31-2017, 07:00 AM
 
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Originally Posted by 1ondoner View Post
Ha! There are a couple of parking lots next to the ferry and they get filled up fast so I don't think I'm the only person who drives to Staten Island and takes the ferry into lower Manhattan. The few times I've driven in Staten Island, I've driven through the residential areas and some parts are in many ways like mainline suburbs.

Which borough is better than SI? Manhattan
It really bugs me when people, newbies of course, use "mainline". It's two words dammit, Main Line. Lol
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Old 05-31-2017, 07:22 AM
 
Location: Dude...., I'm right here
1,507 posts, read 999,554 times
Reputation: 1284
He he he. Mainline, main line, what's the difference? I could care less


Quote:
Originally Posted by kyb01 View Post
It really bugs me when people, newbies of course, use "mainline". It's two words dammit, Main Line. Lol
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Old 05-31-2017, 07:44 AM
 
Location: Center City
7,533 posts, read 8,718,523 times
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Several years back, a work colleague and I attended a conference in Scottsdale. During a free afternoon, we struck out in our rental car in search of Phoenix's downtown. Despite the map telling us we were there, nothing we saw resembled a downtown.
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Old 05-31-2017, 08:29 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia, PA
288 posts, read 177,793 times
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My friend lived in Philly for several years (we met through softball in one of the Philly social sports leagues) and then moved to Houston last year with her bf. She came back up last week for a couple of weddings in Philly and she said that Houston seemed to her not like a city at all, that it just popped up and expanded out of nowhere. She also said that after she got off the train at Jefferson and started walking towards Market street, she missed the urban surrounding and energy so much, she almost started crying! Sorry to be off-topic again, but I'd imagine she would have the same sentiment if it were Phoenix.
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Old 05-31-2017, 08:52 AM
Status: "Living in Pandemica." (set 9 days ago)
 
Location: North by Northwest
7,531 posts, read 10,643,672 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1ondoner View Post
He he he. Mainline, main line, what's the difference? I could care less
One is a linear core of railroad suburbs; the other is shooting up heroin.

I'm glad to hear you're somewhat emotionally invested, though.
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Old 05-31-2017, 08:56 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia
11,978 posts, read 11,261,745 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1ondoner View Post
He he he. Mainline, main line, what's the difference? I could care less
It really bugs me when people say they could care less, when they mean they couldn't lol.
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Old 05-31-2017, 09:02 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia
11,978 posts, read 11,261,745 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MarketStEl View Post
I think you're the first person I've ever heard utter the words "posh" and "Staten Island" in the same sentence.

New York's "forgotten borough" is its rough answer to Northeast Philadephia: a largely middle-class suburban expanse. It might have a few upscale pockets, like the Northeast does, and it does lack the Northeast's pockets of poverty, but on the whole, it's the most middle of the middle of the five boroughs.

I could see where people might want to drive to SI and take the ferry in if they're visiting: It's one of the cheapest cruises you can possibly take, and the approach to Manhattan is incomprarable because there's no other way to approach Lower Manhattan from outside it and have a view.
Not exactly true-"From the slums of Shaolin" Wu Tang Clan ain't nothing to $#@ with!


Haha, but seriously there is a 10% poverty rate in Staten Island (lowest of the boroughs) but probably similar to Northeast Philly as a whole. It is an interesting place-and Anthony Bourdain did have an episode there (or was it George Zimmer?)
The largest landfill in the World, which was in Staten Island, will become the 2nd largest park in NYC. And the beaches are probably ok.
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