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Old 05-31-2017, 11:55 AM
 
1,048 posts, read 646,511 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by branh0913 View Post
I'm far more use to, and more familiar with Manhattan's Grid, which could be figured out in less than an hour. I guess my issue with Philly's grid is that the street numbers don't seem to be in any dicernable order. Also some streets exist in parts of Philly that don't exist in other parts. so to me it seems mostly based on memory. This is also a critique of the overall grid system in the entire city. Center city is actually easy to navigate, even if you have to remember the names of the streets.

I think when you start getting towards West, South, and Southwest Philly it starts to get very confusing. And let's not get started on places like Mt. Airy which appears to be a completely different grid altogether.
Much like Alphabet City in Manhattan, the streets that exist in certain sections but not others are usually due to parts of the city that jut out in one direction or another (like the letter streets that start in Kensington between Front Street and the river).


The general rules are:
  • Number streets go north-south.
  • Name streets go east-west.
  • Even-numbered streets go south and odd-numbered streets go north, until you get to Broad Street (14th Street), at which point they switch.
There are, of course, exceptions to the above, but if you keep to those rules, you will be fine 99% of the time.
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Old 05-31-2017, 11:59 AM
 
1,048 posts, read 646,511 times
Reputation: 1638
Quote:
Originally Posted by kyb01 View Post
What may be confusing to you in S. Philly are, probably, Passyunk and Moyamensing which are at angles.

I generally stay away from the streets that cut across the city on an angle (Passyunk, Moyamensing, and Baltimore, to name the three with which I'm most familiar) unless I actually have to go to a location on one of them.
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Old 05-31-2017, 12:24 PM
 
10,789 posts, read 6,581,043 times
Reputation: 3925
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2e1m5a View Post
The numbers are in order though. I don't like NYC grid because the addresses make no sense and are not viewable on the street signs. Philly on the other hand, has a very consistent and easy to follow address system (N-S streets increment according to their distance from Market Street and E-W follow according to the numbered streets.). So even in Mt. Airy a 7200 N block means 7.2 miles (straight shot) from Market st. In most of the city with numbered streets it couldn't get easier. Northwest and Northeast do have a seperate grid but E-W streets increment according to distance from Main Street/Ridge, Germantown Ave or Roosevelt Blvd and N-S again are incremented according to distance from Market.
I have no idea why most cities do not show the address block on the street signs (well I guess to save costs) but I've always thought Philly has the best marked and easy to read street signs of any city.
Lots and lots and lots of streets signs are missing in Manhattan. If I didn't know my way around it would be easy to find myself going in circles there.

Philly has done a tremendous job installing accurate streets sign. Signage used to be pretty bad. Not true anymore.
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Old 06-01-2017, 09:39 AM
 
1,830 posts, read 1,648,377 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kyb01 View Post
Lots and lots and lots of streets signs are missing in Manhattan. If I didn't know my way around it would be easy to find myself going in circles there.

Philly has done a tremendous job installing accurate streets sign. Signage used to be pretty bad. Not true anymore.

I liked it when signage used to be bad for certain areas where only I knew how to drive and to point B more easily. Then, even during rush hour, I was much more likely to get to point B much sooner than many others. I'm so terrible like that. This happened all the time going to East Falls before they improved that section tremendously.

Oh, and I believe there are no signs for getting on to I76-W if you are crossing the Grays Ferry bridge from Grays Ferry Ave.
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Old 06-01-2017, 11:26 AM
 
10,789 posts, read 6,581,043 times
Reputation: 3925
Quote:
Originally Posted by moneymkt View Post
I agree 100% about septa and it's rude employees. They don't want to give you any information in regards to a question about what bus or trolley is running which has me close to going off on them. So many septa employees seem so miserable which is surprising since they make good money and have great benefits.
On the other hand since I'm an elder some of station booth attendants on the BSL know me so, oftentimes, they just buzz me through the turnstyle. I don't need to show them anything or use my senior septa key card.

There have always been complaints about Septa employees. I'm not a tourist so I see it as my responsibility to learn the parts of the system I need to use without any interaction with them. But, yes, I can see why infrequent riders have issues.
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Old 06-02-2017, 06:25 AM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
8,250 posts, read 4,031,854 times
Reputation: 5351
Someone may have pointed this out already, but:

Manhattan's grid is semi-useless when it comes to getting to a specific address unless you're going to an address on an east-west numbered street, for the north-south avenues have addresses that number consecutively from 1 northward, much like streets in New England cities have.

If I tell you that a place is at 4617 Baltimore Avenue, you should be able to figure it out: Baltimore Avenue is an east-west street (for purposes of the numbering grid), and the house numbers jump by 100 at each numbered street, so this would be between 46th and 47th on Baltimore.

Granted, this would not be as easy for a non-local (or some locals) to figure out for addresses on the numbered north-south streets, for the street names aren't easy to remember and there are some distortions in the grid (for instance, Girard Avenue is 1200 N consistently, but where the block to its south at Front Street is the 1100 block, at Broad it's the 900 block).

And there are the various distortions where the grid bends or intersects with other grids (in Manayunk and Roxborough, "east-west" streets have house numbers that increase from 1 at the Schuylkill east to the Wissahickon, while in Germantown, Mt. Airy and Chestnut Hill, Germantown Avenue, which meanders wrt the grid, is the dividing line between addresses E and addresses W of it, and because it meanders, a grid-following street may not be the same hundred in Mt. Airy that it is in Germantown).

I don't have the same low opinion of SEPTA that the OP has, but then again, I'm a resident of long standing, a frequent rider and a traction buff (fan of electric-powered rail transit). They do, however, know who I am at 1234 Market Street, and when I was covering the subject, my work was considered very knowledgeable.
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Old 06-02-2017, 06:32 AM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
8,250 posts, read 4,031,854 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2e1m5a View Post
The numbers are in order though. I don't like NYC grid because the addresses make no sense and are not viewable on the street signs. Philly on the other hand, has a very consistent and easy to follow address system (N-S streets increment according to their distance from Market Street and E-W follow according to the numbered streets.). So even in Mt. Airy a 7200 N block means 7.2 miles (straight shot) from Market st. In most of the city with numbered streets it couldn't get easier. Northwest and Northeast do have a seperate grid but E-W streets increment according to distance from Main Street/Ridge, Germantown Ave or Roosevelt Blvd and N-S again are incremented according to distance from Market.
I have no idea why most cities do not show the address block on the street signs (well I guess to save costs) but I've always thought Philly has the best marked and easy to read street signs of any city.
I agree with you about Philly's distinctive street signs, which I consider the most informative in the U.S., but:

Ridge Avenue is not a point of origin for street addresses in Roxborough; streets number east from the Schuylkill to the Wissahickon.

Northeast Philadelphia follows the main city grid, where Front Street is 100 E/W (except in Fishtown, where there is a unit block W and the E-W dividing line is Frankford Ave). Where Front Street no longer applies, the Philadelphia/Montgomery County line is 1 E and addresses on E-W streets increase eastward from it. Roosevelt Boulevard is not a point of origin for addresses.

One other confusing element: Because the increment is supposed to be one hundred per tenth mile, not every E-W through street starts a new hundred, and because there are streets that bend within the grid, there are distortions, as I mentioned in my earlier post.
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Old 06-02-2017, 06:33 AM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
8,250 posts, read 4,031,854 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chessimprov View Post
SEPTA is short for "SEPtic TAnk", didn't you know that?
"The Society for the Elimination of Public Transportation Altogether."
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Old 06-02-2017, 07:30 AM
 
6,110 posts, read 2,265,339 times
Reputation: 2709
Quote:
Originally Posted by kyb01 View Post
On the other hand since I'm an elder some of station booth attendants on the BSL know me so, oftentimes, they just buzz me through the turnstyle. I don't need to show them anything or use my senior septa key card.

There have always been complaints about Septa employees. I'm not a tourist so I see it as my responsibility to learn the parts of the system I need to use without any interaction with them. But, yes, I can see why infrequent riders have issues.
I was told by friends who work for Septa that they don't have to give you any additional information if they don't want to when asked questions.
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Old 06-02-2017, 07:41 AM
 
Location: Montco PA
2,082 posts, read 4,437,131 times
Reputation: 1533
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarketStEl View Post
"The Society for the Elimination of Public Transportation Altogether."
Yeah, but they seem OK with buses and subways, they just don't want to be in the regional rail business.
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