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Old 08-13-2018, 01:16 PM
 
1,509 posts, read 1,392,026 times
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How do you know what construction developer offers good construction and which one(s) do not in the area?

I've heard from several people that Toll Brothers construction is not good. They seem to do a decent job creating appearances and picking/creating good locations.

Thank you.
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Old 08-13-2018, 02:41 PM
 
Location: New York City
6,237 posts, read 5,570,825 times
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The thing with Toll Brothers is that they are a massive home builder, and like any large company there are going to be faulty houses mixed in.

Apple makes phones, Ford makes cars, Gap makes clothes. All in mass quantity, and therefore every so often there is a faulty output. A house is a little complicated due to more components, but for the amount of homes Toll builds, the complaints I here are few and far between, and I think they're average home quality has improved in recent years, much thanks to the reduction of stucco.

A great way to tell a good developer from a bad one is to actually check out the site (or get as close as you can). Knowing materials and vendors helps. Their general reputation.

I can't think of any notably bad developers. It is also hard to measure the type of developer you are looking for. A guy who build one house in Breweytown vs Tom Scannapieco are very different.
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Old 08-13-2018, 04:20 PM
 
Location: Denver, CO
23,611 posts, read 10,797,781 times
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Most of the newer tract housing in the metro/suburban area, even though it is expensive, and offers interior square feet (no land) is CRAP. Toll Bros, Pulte, etc. To attain their bottom line, and pay the high prices for land they build substandard housing that may look ok for a few years, but will often become a problem as soon as five, or ten years down the road. Yes, you can have 3,000 to 6,000 sq.ft. and still reach out from your kitchen window, and touch your neighbors house. Close the front door, and the house shakes. They are all Tyvek, and fake siding.
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Old 08-14-2018, 06:45 AM
 
Location: New York City
6,237 posts, read 5,570,825 times
Reputation: 3325
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pilot1 View Post
Most of the newer tract housing in the metro/suburban area, even though it is expensive, and offers interior square feet (no land) is CRAP. Toll Bros, Pulte, etc. To attain their bottom line, and pay the high prices for land they build substandard housing that may look ok for a few years, but will often become a problem as soon as five, or ten years down the road. Yes, you can have 3,000 to 6,000 sq.ft. and still reach out from your kitchen window, and touch your neighbors house. Close the front door, and the house shakes. They are all Tyvek, and fake siding.
Not entirely true.

Looking at your average houses built in the past 50-70 years.

I would say the best quality are either brand new or ones built in the 1950s/60s. The first wave of tract housing resulted in high quality homes, thick joists and supports, copper wiring, layered roofs, etc. The biggest negative for those houses are the expensive upkeep since most of the those materials are obsolete, and a lot of those homes were not properly insulated.

1970's were kitschy, nothing memorable or noteworthy about them.

1980's / 1990's had major quality issues due to the housing boom and shortage of good trades.

Once you hit the mid 2000's quality began to rise due to improvement of the above issues, code changes/ updates and exterior improvements on your average tract house.

I think a lot of the crap from the 1990s still has people scarred with regard to new construction homes, when I see for myself every week that the quality is 100x better.

Obviously, a custom home provides the utmost quality, but as someone in the industry, I would not talk someone out of buying a Toll Brothers home due to lack of quality.

The whole high-fiving your neighbor thing has been a problem since tract housing started. Take a drive through Brookhaven or Levittown, the land ratio of those homes are no different than the mcmansions in Garnet Valley, just smaller homes.
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Old 08-14-2018, 08:11 AM
 
883 posts, read 530,833 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pilot1 View Post
Most of the newer tract housing in the metro/suburban area, even though it is expensive, and offers interior square feet (no land) is CRAP. Toll Bros, Pulte, etc. To attain their bottom line, and pay the high prices for land they build substandard housing that may look ok for a few years, but will often become a problem as soon as five, or ten years down the road. Yes, you can have 3,000 to 6,000 sq.ft. and still reach out from your kitchen window, and touch your neighbors house. Close the front door, and the house shakes. They are all Tyvek, and fake siding.

I largely agree with this. Of course there are exceptions, but...


My husband it a painting contractor. Two years ago, he was painting the outside of a house in the Brooks Farm/Radnor area that was built around 2005. Dry rot around every window of the house. Eleven years old and dry rot? Crazy. Our house was built in 1928, and I love it. Solid as a rock.
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