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Old 08-14-2018, 01:32 PM
 
544 posts, read 462,414 times
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Originally Posted by cpomp View Post

Also, I think Philadelphia is essentially tied with DC as the number 2 food city in the Northeast. New York is obviously in its own league due to the sheer amount of options, but as of late Philadelphia has been creeping up on several cities, DC being one of them. I would place Philadelphia as a top 5-10 food city in the US.


Maybe I am crazy or have been unlucky when I go south but I think Philadephia has a significantly better food scene than DC. I was just there last month. The only great restaurant experience I have had was at Chez Billy Sud in Georgetown and even that wasn't better than a place like Laurel. I found most of the good restaurants to be at the extreme high end of things and the Mid range restaurants to be down right bland and uninteresting. Philly has more than enough high end restaurants but also has plenty of options for those nights when you don't want to spent $200+ per person. Even extremely popular restaurants like Zahav have pretty reasonable price points.


I have long thought of DC as the land of overpriced expense account restaurants and bad fast casual spots like &Pizza.


New York has many great restaurants and almost certainly many more than Philly. I do think that if you walk into a random restaurant in Greater Center City that chances that it will be good are better than if you walk into a random restaurant in Manhattan. But since that's not how most people choose where they are going to eat it doesn't matter though I do appreciate that I can often get reservations day of in Philly or typically walk in off the street which can be difficult in New York.
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Old 08-14-2018, 02:50 PM
 
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Originally Posted by AJNEOA View Post
Boy is this true. That's part of the issue that I and Hannah outlined. When it's just street after street of row homes, it's heavily residential and not much of a reason to visit. Makes the areas of the city that feel like big cities with appeal feel smaller. It's so disappointing to see versions of row houses being built for a full block. We need more apartments with nice street facing storefronts to increase the spread of amenities and excitement, mixing up residential areas.

Well, there's a flip side to that. Go too much to the other extreme and you have NYC. I would never want Philly to look like that. I understand what you mean, though, insofar as a place like Fitler Square seems to be all residential without any dining and/or retail options. But I personally like the "neighborhood in the city" vibe that several areas of Philly have and believe that, as cities go, it is incredibly unique. As much as I love going to NYC and walking around, I think parts of it are downright ugly with retail shop after retail shop after retail shop. Come closing time, if you're walking around all you're going to see are a bunch of gates pulled down over the storefronts.
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Old 08-14-2018, 03:45 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hannah5555 View Post
There's not a lot to do/see in UC aside from the Unis, World Cafe, some nice restaurants and a couple of local parks. Fairmount/Spring Garden and Francisville are mostly residential and if you don't know where you're going, straying beyond the boundaries of Fishtown and No. Libs can get pretty dicey, really fast.
Food here is good, although I have no intention of eating a fried pickle anytime soon (and never ate a pickled egg in London when I lived there either) and so is the music. Only the people who live beyond the limits of CC or "Greater" CC care about those neighborhoods. If I were a young professional and had lived in a larger city like Chicago, DC or New York, Philly would indeed seem like an island which is why it's nice that NYC and DC are not too far away. If you want a city that feels like a small town, then Philly fits that bill.

I think it's a real stretch though to say Philly has the best food on the east coast.
This post makes me feel you have a very myotic view of the city. Some of the best places to eat are in the most random of places. To suggest that young professionals such as myself have no interesting in going to visit what these other neighborhoods and sections of the city have to offer is asinine and untrue. You call Travel and Leisure’s analysis a ‘real stretch’ but I bet you can’t even name more than a handful of restaurants.

I’m sorry but it just reminds me of the foolish people on the city vs city board who go “nothing to see in Philly outside of Center City”. That’s what people who don’t know what they are talking about say.

I started writing out a ton of places, but it’s not worth my time..
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Old 08-14-2018, 03:58 PM
 
Location: Straddling two worlds
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thedirtypirate View Post
This post makes me feel you have a very myotic view of the city. Some of the best places to eat are in the most random of places. To suggest that young professionals such as myself have no interesting in going to visit what these other neighborhoods and sections of the city have to offer is asinine and untrue. You call Travel and Leisure’s analysis a ‘real stretch’ but I bet you can’t even name more than a handful of restaurants.

I’m sorry but it just reminds me of the foolish people on the city vs city board who go “nothing to see in Philly outside of Center City”. That’s what people who don’t know what they are talking about say.

I started writing out a ton of places, but it’s not worth my time..
Well that's an interesting interpretation of what I wrote, to be sure. My "myopic" view of the city is tempered by where I currently live coupled with my current financial situation that places restrictions on my ability to visit other areas of the city unfettered.

I never said the other neighborhoods weren't worth visiting. I said you had to be careful since this city can be very block by block. I never said I thought CC was the be all and end all, which I don't BTW. I was responding to specific comments already posted. And although I have already said I think Philadelphia has good food, I still don't think it's the best food on the east coast. Honestly, I don't think any city can lay claim to that.

But you think what you will. No skin off my nose and I certainly wouldn't want you to waste any time.
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Old 08-14-2018, 06:47 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hannah5555 View Post
Well that's an interesting interpretation of what I wrote, to be sure. My "myopic" view of the city is tempered by where I currently live coupled with my current financial situation that places restrictions on my ability to visit other areas of the city unfettered.

I never said the other neighborhoods weren't worth visiting. I said you had to be careful since this city can be very block by block. I never said I thought CC was the be all and end all, which I don't BTW. I was responding to specific comments already posted. And although I have already said I think Philadelphia has good food, I still don't think it's the best food on the east coast. Honestly, I don't think any city can lay claim to that.


Maybe I took your comments about living in center city being akin to living on an island to literal. I did interpret that statement as an 'be all and end all' type thing.

Philadelphia's restaurant scene is something to brag about. Food and sports are the two things this city unites around. One thing I love is how restaurants have tried to fuse their own culture into the city's: The Hunt for Philadelphia's Strangest, Most Delicious Mashup Sandwiches
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Old 08-14-2018, 06:57 PM
 
Location: Straddling two worlds
3,049 posts, read 1,051,342 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thedirtypirate View Post
Maybe I took your comments about living in center city being akin to living on an island to literal. I did interpret that statement as an 'be all and end all' type thing.

Philadelphia's restaurant scene is something to brag about. Food and sports are the two things this city unites around. One thing I love is how restaurants have tried to fuse their own culture into the city's: The Hunt for Philadelphia's Strangest, Most Delicious Mashup Sandwiches
I never said it was an island, another poster did, "The only minor quip that kept coming up was that it felt "small" due to Center City still remaining kind of an island."

What I actually said was that very little attention is ever paid to areas OTHER than CC or greater CC. Earlier today I posted what I thought was a very interesting event happening in West Philly this week and as usual not one regular poster in this forum commented. They never do. Maybe because it doesn't apply to them. Whatevs.

Totally agree about food and sports being a huge positive for this city.
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Old 08-14-2018, 08:06 PM
 
Location: Boston Metrowest (via the Philly area)
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Philly very much presents the "perfect storm" of 1) many areas of high population density and foot traffic, 2) dramatically more affordable real estate that strongly encourages culinary entrepreneurs without the insane risk that you'd find in NYC, DC and Boston, and 3) a vibrant BYOB culture that permits restaurants to focus on their food operations, as opposed to being forced to seek/maintain a prohibitively expensive liquor license.
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Old 08-14-2018, 08:35 PM
 
Location: Boston Metrowest (via the Philly area)
4,745 posts, read 7,845,060 times
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Originally Posted by kyb01 View Post
Bostonians have always been snobs long before they became a "thing". New Englanders are insufferable.
Not to derail the topic, but my experience has actually been that New Englanders/Bostonians are widely pretty down-to-earth and affable folks. Actually remind me a lot of Philadelphians in that regard.

The insufferable/"Boston is God's gift to the world" types certainly do exist, but they're not nearly as common as they're portrayed.

More to the point, Boston has some fantastic food establishments, but again, not nearly as many approachable ones and not quite as truly unique/creative as in Philly. The "corporate" tech influence has come to dominate that city way too much. It's definitely lost its edge.
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Old 08-14-2018, 08:38 PM
 
4,094 posts, read 2,009,172 times
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Originally Posted by Duderino View Post
Philly very much presents the "perfect storm" of 1) many areas of high population density and foot traffic, 2) dramatically more affordable real estate that strongly encourages culinary entrepreneurs without the insane risk that you'd find in NYC, DC and Boston, and 3) a vibrant BYOB culture that permits restaurants to focus on their food operations, as opposed to being forced to seek/maintain a prohibitively expensive liquor license.
The reason BYOB is necessary for Philly eateries is the state we are in especially.

https://triblive.com/state/pennsylva...s-auction-plcb

The state restricts them to only 1 per 3000 residents also.
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Old 08-14-2018, 08:55 PM
 
5,351 posts, read 5,570,613 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kyb01 View Post
Well, we don't agree about a lot of stuff. I don't see CC as an island. I'm not in love with trees everywhere. And row houses are a huge part of what makes Philadelphia, Philadelphia, imo. I do include twins as a kind of row house example because of the common wall.
I’m not suggesting that center city should transition to twin housing and tree filled neighborhoods. Streets with trees like Center City are enough. I’m simply suggesting that there could be more variety in many neighborhoods. And while we may not agree that center city is an island, it is distinct from most every neighborhood around it. So I’m not sure how it’s not different.
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