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Old 08-13-2018, 03:41 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia/South Jersey area
3,130 posts, read 1,619,018 times
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According to the folks at Travel & Insurance.

https://www.phillyvoice.com/travel-a...od-east-coast/

kind of cool.
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Old 08-14-2018, 12:26 AM
 
374 posts, read 563,852 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eliza61nyc View Post
According to the folks at Travel & Insurance.

https://www.phillyvoice.com/travel-a...od-east-coast/

kind of cool.
As soon as the PhillyVoice writer included Boston with NYC, she lost all credibility. Boston has never been (food wise) anything great. OTOH, Philly jumps in and out of that hoop, every few years. The thing about Boston is that it knows how to glorify itself better than just about any city in the country. Philly should learn from it.
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Old 08-14-2018, 06:56 AM
 
Location: New York City
6,227 posts, read 5,562,899 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by acenturi View Post
As soon as the PhillyVoice writer included Boston with NYC, she lost all credibility. Boston has never been (food wise) anything great. OTOH, Philly jumps in and out of that hoop, every few years. The thing about Boston is that it knows how to glorify itself better than just about any city in the country. Philly should learn from it.
Agreed, however, DC is starting to give Boston a run for its money. But I have never met anyone who considers Boston a top foodie city, new one for me...

Kind of off topic, but I was in Chicago for a festival last weekend, and met people from all over and had so many positive discussions about Philadelphia ranging from the food to the nightlife to the density of the streets. Most notable was a group of friends from LA who did some tech work in Philadelphia and they said it was a gorgeous city.

The only minor quip that kept coming up was that it felt "small" due to Center City still remaining kind of an island.

But Philadelphia could certainly learn from the snobbish ways of Boston and now DC about showing off their town to outsiders.
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Old 08-14-2018, 07:58 AM
 
10,273 posts, read 5,934,396 times
Reputation: 3628
Quote:
Originally Posted by cpomp View Post
Agreed, however, DC is starting to give Boston a run for its money. But I have never met anyone who considers Boston a top foodie city, new one for me...

Kind of off topic, but I was in Chicago for a festival last weekend, and met people from all over and had so many positive discussions about Philadelphia ranging from the food to the nightlife to the density of the streets. Most notable was a group of friends from LA who did some tech work in Philadelphia and they said it was a gorgeous city.

The only minor quip that kept coming up was that it felt "small" due to Center City still remaining kind of an island.

But Philadelphia could certainly learn from the snobbish ways of Boston and now DC about showing off their town to outsiders.
The connectivity between CC, UC, Fairmount/Spring Garden/Francisville, Upper S. Philly is pretty much complete. Fishtown, No.Libs are easy to get to. Have your friends been to all of those?

Bostonians have always been snobs long before they became a "thing". New Englanders are insufferable.
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Old 08-14-2018, 09:24 AM
 
Location: Straddling two worlds
3,049 posts, read 1,051,342 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kyb01 View Post
The connectivity between CC, UC, Fairmount/Spring Garden/Francisville, Upper S. Philly is pretty much complete. Fishtown, No.Libs are easy to get to. Have your friends been to all of those?

Bostonians have always been snobs long before they became a "thing". New Englanders are insufferable.
Quote:
Originally Posted by cpomp View Post
Agreed, however, DC is starting to give Boston a run for its money. But I have never met anyone who considers Boston a top foodie city, new one for me...

Kind of off topic, but I was in Chicago for a festival last weekend, and met people from all over and had so many positive discussions about Philadelphia ranging from the food to the nightlife to the density of the streets. Most notable was a group of friends from LA who did some tech work in Philadelphia and they said it was a gorgeous city.

The only minor quip that kept coming up was that it felt "small" due to Center City still remaining kind of an island.

But Philadelphia could certainly learn from the snobbish ways of Boston and now DC about showing off their town to outsiders.
There's not a lot to do/see in UC aside from the Unis, World Cafe, some nice restaurants and a couple of local parks. Fairmount/Spring Garden and Francisville are mostly residential and if you don't know where you're going, straying beyond the boundaries of Fishtown and No. Libs can get pretty dicey, really fast.

Food here is good, although I have no intention of eating a fried pickle anytime soon (and never ate a pickled egg in London when I lived there either) and so is the music. Only the people who live beyond the limits of CC or "Greater" CC care about those neighborhoods. If I were a young professional and had lived in a larger city like Chicago, DC or New York, Philly would indeed seem like an island which is why it's nice that NYC and DC are not too far away. If you want a city that feels like a small town, then Philly fits that bill.

I think it's a real stretch though to say Philly has the best food on the east coast.
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Old 08-14-2018, 10:10 AM
 
5,351 posts, read 5,570,613 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hannah5555 View Post
There's not a lot to do/see in UC aside from the Unis, World Cafe, some nice restaurants and a couple of local parks. Fairmount/Spring Garden and Francisville are mostly residential and if you don't know where you're going, straying beyond the boundaries of Fishtown and No. Libs can get pretty dicey, really fast.

Food here is good, although I have no intention of eating a fried pickle anytime soon (and never ate a pickled egg in London when I lived there either) and so is the music. Only the people who live beyond the limits of CC or "Greater" CC care about those neighborhoods. If I were a young professional and had lived in a larger city like Chicago, DC or New York, Philly would indeed seem like an island which is why it's nice that NYC and DC are not too far away. If you want a city that feels like a small town, then Philly fits that bill.

I think it's a real stretch though to say Philly has the best food on the east coast.
I don't think Philly feels like a small town, but I do agree with your assessment of the other neighborhoods and the experience. What Philly is really not good at is investing in public projects to connect and keep these other places suitable for visitors (e.g. cleanliness). Dilworth and Love Park are a great start, but so many of these projects happen in Center City.

Center City maintains itself and is noticeably different from most of its surrounding hoods. The most seamless transition is probably from Center City to Queen Village and Bella Vista. They are both pretty clean and have trees and nice architecture. They also have significant assets (9th St Market, restaurants, Fabric Row, etc.) that keep the experience rich.

GradHo is ok on the northern end, but much more residential and the amenities are lacking the further you get away from South Street. No real reason for visitors to go there. Passyunk Square and Pennsport are both great neighborhoods, but to get there, you have to travel over that turd called Washington Avenue and visitors are going to think they're going someplace they maybe shouldn't. This is something you don't have to deal with in Boston for the most part. Cleanliness, trees, and connectivity with well-maintained public spaces...

I do agree with your assessment of University City and I think that's only going to get better. I go there on occasion and aside from a museum or two and a nice walk on Locust through campus, there's not much there for a tourist (or me). Food options are good, but I'm not sure they're great (isn't Ethiopian food good there?).

Fairmount and even Northern Liberties are both very residential (to get to NoLibs, you have to walk through a bit of no-man's land or take the El). Girard in Fishtown is really a great experience but separated enough from Center City that many tourists might not make it there. And the El station is just ok. The average tourist may not feel comfortable...

Philly has a lot of things to do to keep on the current trajectory. To naturally expand offerings to tourists, public spaces, cleanliness, safety and connectivity really need work. And for food, that's important because so many great restaurants exist outside of Center City!
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Old 08-14-2018, 10:13 AM
 
Location: New York City
6,227 posts, read 5,562,899 times
Reputation: 3325
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hannah5555 View Post
There's not a lot to do/see in UC aside from the Unis, World Cafe, some nice restaurants and a couple of local parks. Fairmount/Spring Garden and Francisville are mostly residential and if you don't know where you're going, straying beyond the boundaries of Fishtown and No. Libs can get pretty dicey, really fast.

Food here is good, although I have no intention of eating a fried pickle anytime soon (and never ate a pickled egg in London when I lived there either) and so is the music. Only the people who live beyond the limits of CC or "Greater" CC care about those neighborhoods. If I were a young professional and had lived in a larger city like Chicago, DC or New York, Philly would indeed seem like an island which is why it's nice that NYC and DC are not too far away. If you want a city that feels like a small town, then Philly fits that bill.

I think it's a real stretch though to say Philly has the best food on the east coast.
Which is odd that people say DC feels bigger. I think it is because they have a more consistent flow between neighborhoods. I think Philadelphia is doing a great job at closing the gaps, but CC is still confined to its little region. I think the stretch going South from CC is more cohesive than going North (though that gap is improving quickly). Going West is fine because of U City, but those pesky lots on Western Market need to be redeveloped ASAP.

That being said, I still think Philadelphia has a better downtown district compared to DC, it is just a lot more compact.

Some missing links that need to be filled to fully unify CC are western Walnut - JFK, there are projects in the works, but its still pretty barren.
The area around Hahnemann (specifically the land near the Cathedral that the Archdioceses is planning to sell to developers.
Spring Garden where it meets 12th and Ridge going East needs some work, and there is a hard boundary into the Poplar neighborhood, much thanks to PHA.

Those are the only main outliers I can think of. Obviously the continued improvement of Eastern Market St is important, but that area is always busy and connected either way.

I also think Philadelphia needs to continue to diversify its amenities and housing stock. The most bustling exciting neighborhoods are the ones that have variety and not just rowhomes lined up. Northern Liberties and Fishtown are great examples of bustling districts, they are just separated from CC at this point, because its a rather dreary walk between there and CC.

Also, I think Philadelphia is essentially tied with DC as the number 2 food city in the Northeast. New York is obviously in its own league due to the sheer amount of options, but as of late Philadelphia has been creeping up on several cities, DC being one of them. I would place Philadelphia as a top 5-10 food city in the US.
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Old 08-14-2018, 10:23 AM
 
10,273 posts, read 5,934,396 times
Reputation: 3628
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hannah5555 View Post
There's not a lot to do/see in UC aside from the Unis, World Cafe, some nice restaurants and a couple of local parks. Fairmount/Spring Garden and Francisville are mostly residential and if you don't know where you're going, straying beyond the boundaries of Fishtown and No. Libs can get pretty dicey, really fast.

Food here is good, although I have no intention of eating a fried pickle anytime soon (and never ate a pickled egg in London when I lived there either) and so is the music. Only the people who live beyond the limits of CC or "Greater" CC care about those neighborhoods. If I were a young professional and had lived in a larger city like Chicago, DC or New York, Philly would indeed seem like an island which is why it's nice that NYC and DC are not too far away. If you want a city that feels like a small town, then Philly fits that bill.

I think it's a real stretch though to say Philly has the best food on the east coast.
Aren't there several places in the city that you haven't been to? A lot of ethnic food in the NE neighborhoods?

DC(the district), is not larger than Phila.
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Old 08-14-2018, 10:29 AM
 
Location: Straddling two worlds
3,049 posts, read 1,051,342 times
Reputation: 2247
Quote:
Originally Posted by cpomp View Post
Which is odd that people say DC feels bigger. I think it is because they have a more consistent flow between neighborhoods. I think Philadelphia is doing a great job at closing the gaps, but CC is still confined to its little region. I think the stretch going South from CC is more cohesive than going North (though that gap is improving quickly). Going West is fine because of U City, but those pesky lots on Western Market need to be redeveloped ASAP.

That being said, I still think Philadelphia has a better downtown district compared to DC, it is just a lot more compact.

Some missing links that need to be filled to fully unify CC are western Walnut - JFK, there are projects in the works, but its still pretty barren.
The area around Hahnemann (specifically the land near the Cathedral that the Archdioceses is planning to sell to developers.
Spring Garden where it meets 12th and Ridge going East needs some work, and there is a hard boundary into the Poplar neighborhood, much thanks to PHA.

Those are the only main outliers I can think of. Obviously the continued improvement of Eastern Market St is important, but that area is always busy and connected either way.

I also think Philadelphia needs to continue to diversify its amenities and housing stock. The most bustling exciting neighborhoods are the ones that have variety and not just rowhomes lined up. Northern Liberties and Fishtown are great examples of bustling districts, they are just separated from CC at this point, because its a rather dreary walk between there and CC.

Also, I think Philadelphia is essentially tied with DC as the number 2 food city in the Northeast. New York is obviously in its own league due to the sheer amount of options, but as of late Philadelphia has been creeping up on several cities, DC being one of them. I would place Philadelphia as a top 5-10 food city in the US.
I only included DC because it was mentioned earlier. I haven't been there since I was 12. But again, the areas you mention are all within the boundaries of CC or greater CC. That is not a criticism; it is a perfect example of what I'm talking about. I tend to eat in places that only have live music so my experience with restaurants here has been limited. That said, the food is almost always as good as the music .
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Old 08-14-2018, 10:31 AM
 
Location: The Left Toast
1,231 posts, read 1,520,201 times
Reputation: 905
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hannah5555 View Post
If I were a young professional and had lived in a larger city like Chicago, DC or New York, Philly would indeed seem like an island which is why it's nice that NYC and DC are not too far away. If you want a city that feels like a small town, then Philly fits that bill.

I think it's a real stretch though to say Philly has the best food on the east coast.
Hmmmm.......What do you mean by having lived in a larger city and including D.C. within the likes of Chicago and New York? Also what's your definition of a small town feel for a big city? I've recently returned from working the past six months in a few small towns as well as a couple of big cities that truly felt like small towns.. "In that sense." Atlanta and Nashville being two of them.
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