U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Pennsylvania > Philadelphia
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 09-29-2018, 12:30 AM
 
Location: SW Florida
4,614 posts, read 6,274,166 times
Reputation: 7809

Advertisements

I was just up in the hometown last week and drove through some side streets to get back to the airport. I notice that all the cars are parked perfectly neatly, no one's cockeyed or half up on the curb or jutting out into the street. And VERRRRY close together. My question is, HOW does everyone manage to do that? I get anxiety when I have to parallel-park. I always wanted to live in Center City but I think that parking situation would completely stress me out.

Also, do you get a lot of dings, front or back, because people have to fit into such tight spaces?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 09-29-2018, 12:33 AM
 
2,187 posts, read 2,099,408 times
Reputation: 3688
In Thailand I've seen cars parallel parked so close to each other, within inches, that I could never figure out how they did it. I was just going by bus looking at the sidewalks so I never saw a car parallel park to see how they did it but it was amazing compared to the US where most cars have plenty of space between cars.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-29-2018, 03:52 PM
 
Location: Dude...., I'm right here
1,245 posts, read 801,560 times
Reputation: 736
My experience with London, where cars are smaller, dings are inevitable. That's why I avoid parallel parking especially for long periods. I once parallel parked in London and I got sandwiched such that I couldn't leave. From my experience, some drivers don't mind dinging cars when parallel parking. I don't know if it's this bad here in Philly.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Avalon08 View Post
I was just up in the hometown last week and drove through some side streets to get back to the airport. I notice that all the cars are parked perfectly neatly, no one's cockeyed or half up on the curb or jutting out into the street. And VERRRRY close together. My question is, HOW does everyone manage to do that? I get anxiety when I have to parallel-park. I always wanted to live in Center City but I think that parking situation would completely stress me out.

Also, do you get a lot of dings, front or back, because people have to fit into such tight spaces?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-30-2018, 09:24 AM
 
10,279 posts, read 5,946,889 times
Reputation: 3643
Quote:
Originally Posted by Avalon08 View Post
I was just up in the hometown last week and drove through some side streets to get back to the airport. I notice that all the cars are parked perfectly neatly, no one's cockeyed or half up on the curb or jutting out into the street. And VERRRRY close together. My question is, HOW does everyone manage to do that? I get anxiety when I have to parallel-park. I always wanted to live in Center City but I think that parking situation would completely stress me out.

Also, do you get a lot of dings, front or back, because people have to fit into such tight spaces?
When I was driving and parked in my neighborhood, I had to LEARN how to do that. You really have to angle the car in just the right way. It takes skill no doubt about it. Eventually I learned how to judge the amount of space that was in the available spot. I learned whether my car could fit into it. If it was too small, I moved on because you do not want to waste time or hold up someone who may pull up behind.... folks are likely to start honking if you take too long.

I actually got good enough at it that it would take me about 5-8 or so minutes to angle, back up and in, get close enough to the curb and straight out the car. You will likely touch someone's bumper but not hard enough that you ding it with marks, scrape paint or make dents.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-30-2018, 12:28 PM
 
Location: North by Northwest
7,476 posts, read 10,242,105 times
Reputation: 4755
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1ondoner View Post
My experience with London, where cars are smaller, dings are inevitable. That's why I avoid parallel parking especially for long periods. I once parallel parked in London and I got sandwiched such that I couldn't leave. From my experience, some drivers don't mind dinging cars when parallel parking. I don't know if it's this bad here in Philly.
While it does happen, I don't think it's quite so bad here.

What does frustrate me is the number of drivers who think nothing of clipping parked cars' side view mirrors and going on their merry way.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-30-2018, 09:01 PM
 
Location: SW Florida
4,614 posts, read 6,274,166 times
Reputation: 7809
Quote:
Originally Posted by kyb01 View Post
When I was driving and parked in my neighborhood, I had to LEARN how to do that. You really have to angle the car in just the right way. It takes skill no doubt about it. Eventually I learned how to judge the amount of space that was in the available spot. I learned whether my car could fit into it. If it was too small, I moved on because you do not want to waste time or hold up someone who may pull up behind.... folks are likely to start honking if you take too long.

I actually got good enough at it that it would take me about 5-8 or so minutes to angle, back up and in, get close enough to the curb and straight out the car. You will likely touch someone's bumper but not hard enough that you ding it with marks, scrape paint or make dents.
I used to be really good at it, but (1) age happened and I can't turn my neck that well, and (b) I have a (small) SUV which obviously is bigger than a regular car, but it's hard to see out those side windows. It has a backup camera but I don't think it's that user-friendly. And having to hold up traffic would really stress me out!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-01-2018, 07:05 AM
 
239 posts, read 139,615 times
Reputation: 336
It's really simple: The more you do it, the better you are at it. City residents are typically good at it because we have to be; our daily parking depends on it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-01-2018, 08:34 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia, PA
288 posts, read 162,196 times
Reputation: 284
Agree with above; repetition and practice makes perfect. Lived in Ardmore for 1 year and kinda lost it, but moved back into the city 2.5 years ago and it came back. I am a boss at it with my large sedan (Passat). Having parking sensors and back-up camera certainly help.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-01-2018, 03:42 PM
 
1,509 posts, read 1,392,026 times
Reputation: 842
Quote:
Originally Posted by kyb01 View Post
When I was driving and parked in my neighborhood, I had to LEARN how to do that. You really have to angle the car in just the right way. It takes skill no doubt about it. Eventually I learned how to judge the amount of space that was in the available spot. I learned whether my car could fit into it. If it was too small, I moved on because you do not want to waste time or hold up someone who may pull up behind.... folks are likely to start honking if you take too long.

I actually got good enough at it that it would take me about 5-8 or so minutes to angle, back up and in, get close enough to the curb and straight out the car. You will likely touch someone's bumper but not hard enough that you ding it with marks, scrape paint or make dents.

When you parallel park in a (small) spot, are you saying you keep trying until you get the right angle, or you are able to go back and forth and inch your way into the spot or to see that you can't?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-02-2018, 08:10 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia/South Jersey area
3,130 posts, read 1,620,937 times
Reputation: 11353
Lol, try learning how to drive in NYC where your road test is on the city streets ��.
I can squeeze my car in spaces that didn't even know they were spaces
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Pennsylvania > Philadelphia
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top