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Old 10-03-2019, 06:52 PM
 
547 posts, read 339,818 times
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As of the 2010 Census,[7] Mount Airy had 27,035 residents, 11,934 households, and 6,636 families. 62.5% of residents were Black or African-American, 31.7% White/Caucasian, and 5.8% were from other races or from 2 or more races.


Haha

 
Old 10-03-2019, 10:48 PM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
6,210 posts, read 3,048,381 times
Reputation: 3932
Quote:
Originally Posted by DXBtoFL View Post
OP's disappeared a long time ago but all of you boosting Mount Airy conveniently ignore she's looking for public schools.

That rules out Mount Airy. Just because there's a nice mixture of black and white and some gay families doesn't mean diddly squat if the public schools are bad, which they are.
The former head of Mt. Airy USA (now the Mt. Airy CDC) ran tours for real estate agents to show them what the neighborhood's three public schools were really like.

I've been collecting anecdotal evidence from parents of children in "bad" schools, including one that sits on the Germantown/Mt. Airy border and draws students from both neighborhoods. These parents have told me, or made comments on school-rating websites to the effect, that their children are (were) doing well in them and that the schools had good teachers and leaders (the School District of Philadelphia has given school principals far more autonomy in running the schools than it had in the past).

What this tells me is that there are things outside the classroom that matter as much, or even more, than what goes on inside it in determining how students perform in a school. (The fact that the strongest correlating factor with academic performance is household income also suggests this.)

The parend considering Mt. Airy might want to visit its schools and decide for themselves whether they're "bad" or not. (I increasingly recommend this to anyone. After all, no one buys a house without looking at it first, right?)
 
Old 10-04-2019, 07:41 AM
 
10,265 posts, read 5,934,396 times
Reputation: 3628
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluewin888 View Post
Where is mount airy ??
In the city's nw section. There are two: East Mt Airy and West Mt Airy.
 
Old 10-04-2019, 07:45 AM
 
10,265 posts, read 5,934,396 times
Reputation: 3628
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarketStEl View Post
The former head of Mt. Airy USA (now the Mt. Airy CDC) ran tours for real estate agents to show them what the neighborhood's three public schools were really like.

I've been collecting anecdotal evidence from parents of children in "bad" schools, including one that sits on the Germantown/Mt. Airy border and draws students from both neighborhoods. These parents have told me, or made comments on school-rating websites to the effect, that their children are (were) doing well in them and that the schools had good teachers and leaders (the School District of Philadelphia has given school principals far more autonomy in running the schools than it had in the past).

What this tells me is that there are things outside the classroom that matter as much, or even more, than what goes on inside it in determining how students perform in a school. (The fact that the strongest correlating factor with academic performance is household income also suggests this.)

The parend considering Mt. Airy might want to visit its schools and decide for themselves whether they're "bad" or not. (I increasingly recommend this to anyone. After all, no one buys a house without looking at it first, right?)
Is there a reason to write this kind of detailed answer to someone whose handle includes "toFL"?
 
Old 10-04-2019, 08:59 AM
 
80 posts, read 18,389 times
Reputation: 114
I live in Philadelphia now.

I was just in Mount Airy two weekends ago and couldn't help notice how outside every decently kept up house was a sign advertising a private school open house. GFS is quite popular, apparently. Greene Street is another. Some for Springside Chestnut Hill. Didn't see many for Penn Charter, oddly enough.

People looking for good public schools are not looking in Mount Airy, full stop. They are going to the Main Line or Wyndmoor or Haddonfield or a bunch of other suburban areas. People looking for good public schools are not interested in navigating the minefield that is Philadelphia public schools.

I'm glad it worked for some of you. I know it can work and I know very well one can get a great education in the city schools. I know about Masterman and Central and have friends with kids at Penn Alexander and Meredith. But I am old enough and have spent enough time on internet forums to know when someone says "we're looking for good public schools" they want a good suburban school district where they can enroll their kids into the local neighborhood elementary/middle/high schools and not have to worry about it. "good public schools" = / = "tell me how to navigate the minefield of Philadelphia public and charter schools." This is especially true for out of towners, not people who have lived in the city for years already and have a decade of exposure to gaming the city schools minefield through carefully selecting the catchment areas and the lotteries and developing the thick skin for dealing with it.

In short, out of towners relocating to Philadelphia and looking for good public schools are not going to be interested in Mount Airy.
 
Old 10-04-2019, 09:52 AM
 
Location: North Jackson
2,076 posts, read 3,334,972 times
Reputation: 2779
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarketStEl View Post
The parend considering Mt. Airy might want to visit its schools and decide for themselves whether they're "bad" or not. (I increasingly recommend this to anyone. After all, no one buys a house without looking at it first, right?)
Ha! That's exactly what they want, to drop their kid into the school and not think about it for 12 years. And then at year 11.5 they expect their kid to have a full scholarship to Harvard, and are surprised when it doesn't happen.

But if they want to transfer $20,000 per year, per child, out of their savings, who am I to stop them?

So yes, they're not going to respond well if you tell them Philly schools churn out college attendees by the thousands, and not just from Masterman and Central, and the key is involved parents.
 
Old 10-05-2019, 03:22 AM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
6,210 posts, read 3,048,381 times
Reputation: 3932
Quote:
Originally Posted by JacksonPanther View Post
Ha! That's exactly what they want, to drop their kid into the school and not think about it for 12 years. And then at year 11.5 they expect their kid to have a full scholarship to Harvard, and are surprised when it doesn't happen.

But if they want to transfer $20,000 per year, per child, out of their savings, who am I to stop them?

So yes, they're not going to respond well if you tell them Philly schools churn out college attendees by the thousands, and not just from Masterman and Central, and the key is involved parents.
The citywide magnets in general - not just the exam schools (Masterman and Central), but also Bodine, Academy at Palumbo, CAPA, and W.B. Saul (that last being the only Eastern big-city high school I know of devoted to agriculture) - do well at placing their kids in college.

I count a Bodine grad among my friends. In the course of one conversation I had with him, the quality of his arguments and knowledge ultimately led me to ask him, "So why didn't you end up attending Harvard?" (FTR, I'm Class of 1980.) The answer: He had some personal demons he was, and occasionally still does, wrestle with.
 
Old 10-05-2019, 03:39 AM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
6,210 posts, read 3,048,381 times
Reputation: 3932
This comment from a parent of a child who had been enrolled in Anna Lingelbach Elementary School - it's located on Wayne Avenue at the Germantown/Mt. Airy border; built in 1957, it's the newest of the three public schools whose catchments include parts of Mt. Airy - IMO captures both the promise and problem of public education in Philadelphia. You will find it on GreatSchools.org, which gives the school low marks across the board (overall, 2 out of 10, but also 4 out of 10 in academic progress and 2 out of 10 in equity):

Quote:
I'm giving Lingelbach four stars based on the caliber of the philadelphia public schools. My son came to Lingelbach after spending 3 years and $21,000 for private school. I was very apprehensive about sending my son to lingelbach, however, he is finally getting the support that my $21,000 couldn't buy him in private school. The school is older and definitely could use more resources but the teachers are commited and go above and beyond. The PE teacher is great and there is dragon boat racing and basketball, just to mention a few. They have a nurse and a counselor. Last year they got a new computer lab and hopefully new technology is on its way. The principle is new and is helping to turn this failing school into an achieving school. He is green and is not approachable but hopefully that will improve. My son has grown by leaps and bounds over the past two years but I probably will not keep him at lingelbach, past next year. The lack of resources is a problem, the lack of parent involvement is disheartening and frankly some of the kids are behavior problems and can be a distraction from learning. On a positive note. HSA is small but mighty. Wish neighborhood families would return.
(emphasis added)

Judging from the tuition figure, I'm going to guess this parent sent their son to a Catholic school. I don't know of any non-sectarian private school that charges that little, but I may be underinformed here.

The two phrases I boldfaced capture the promise and the problem, respectively. But please note the parent's concluding sentence. (This review was posted in 2015.)

I was also double-teamed one Sunday after services at First Presbyterian Church in Germantown by two (white) women who also sent their children to Lingelbach. They couldn't say enough that was positive about the school. Their children, they told me, were thriving there and getting a very good education.

I lean more towards JacksonPanther's position than DXBtoFL's, it should be clear by now, but that doesn't mean I don't acknowledge the problems. I simply maintain, as JacksonPanther does, that parental involvement in their children's education can make even a "bad" school good. Again, household income correlates with school performance more than any other factor. Those parents who dismiss the neighborhood public schools in Mt. Airy out of hand without examining them first may be doing themselves a disservice. They're certainly not advancing the cause of integration either, something else I believe in deeply, having "grown up integrated" myself.

Coda: DXBtoFL: I think you'll find more of those yard signs in West Mt. Airy than in East Mt, Airy, including East Mt. Airy's more affluent northern half.
 
Old 10-05-2019, 10:31 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia
11,942 posts, read 10,818,746 times
Reputation: 8139
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarketStEl View Post
This comment from a parent of a child who had been enrolled in Anna Lingelbach Elementary School - it's located on Wayne Avenue at the Germantown/Mt. Airy border; built in 1957, it's the newest of the three public schools whose catchments include parts of Mt. Airy - IMO captures both the promise and problem of public education in Philadelphia. You will find it on GreatSchools.org, which gives the school low marks across the board (overall, 2 out of 10, but also 4 out of 10 in academic progress and 2 out of 10 in equity):



(emphasis added)

Judging from the tuition figure, I'm going to guess this parent sent their son to a Catholic school. I don't know of any non-sectarian private school that charges that little, but I may be underinformed here.

The two phrases I boldfaced capture the promise and the problem, respectively. But please note the parent's concluding sentence. (This review was posted in 2015.)

I was also double-teamed one Sunday after services at First Presbyterian Church in Germantown by two (white) women who also sent their children to Lingelbach. They couldn't say enough that was positive about the school. Their children, they told me, were thriving there and getting a very good education.

I lean more towards JacksonPanther's position than DXBtoFL's, it should be clear by now, but that doesn't mean I don't acknowledge the problems. I simply maintain, as JacksonPanther does, that parental involvement in their children's education can make even a "bad" school good. Again, household income correlates with school performance more than any other factor. Those parents who dismiss the neighborhood public schools in Mt. Airy out of hand without examining them first may be doing themselves a disservice. They're certainly not advancing the cause of integration either, something else I believe in deeply, having "grown up integrated" myself.

Coda: DXBtoFL: I think you'll find more of those yard signs in West Mt. Airy than in East Mt, Airy, including East Mt. Airy's more affluent northern half.

Mmh Catholic Archdiocese schools were closer to $2-3k in tuition 5-10 years ago. I can't imagine they increased that much. $7k may be Project Learn in Mt. Airy but yeah I believe the Friends Schools are closer to $20k+


My High School -Saint Joseph's Prep---was $6k when my brother attended, $12k when I attended in 2005 and today is $25k smh.
 
Old 10-06-2019, 07:22 AM
 
10,265 posts, read 5,934,396 times
Reputation: 3628
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarketStEl View Post
This comment from a parent of a child who had been enrolled in Anna Lingelbach Elementary School - it's located on Wayne Avenue at the Germantown/Mt. Airy border; built in 1957, it's the newest of the three public schools whose catchments include parts of Mt. Airy - IMO captures both the promise and problem of public education in Philadelphia. You will find it on GreatSchools.org, which gives the school low marks across the board (overall, 2 out of 10, but also 4 out of 10 in academic progress and 2 out of 10 in equity):



(emphasis added)

Judging from the tuition figure, I'm going to guess this parent sent their son to a Catholic school. I don't know of any non-sectarian private school that charges that little, but I may be underinformed here.

The two phrases I boldfaced capture the promise and the problem, respectively. But please note the parent's concluding sentence. (This review was posted in 2015.)

I was also double-teamed one Sunday after services at First Presbyterian Church in Germantown by two (white) women who also sent their children to Lingelbach. They couldn't say enough that was positive about the school. Their children, they told me, were thriving there and getting a very good education.

I lean more towards JacksonPanther's position than DXBtoFL's, it should be clear by now, but that doesn't mean I don't acknowledge the problems. I simply maintain, as JacksonPanther does, that parental involvement in their children's education can make even a "bad" school good. Again, household income correlates with school performance more than any other factor. Those parents who dismiss the neighborhood public schools in Mt. Airy out of hand without examining them first may be doing themselves a disservice. They're certainly not advancing the cause of integration either, something else I believe in deeply, having "grown up integrated" myself.

Coda: DXBtoFL: I think you'll find more of those yard signs in West Mt. Airy than in East Mt, Airy, including East Mt. Airy's more affluent northern half.
Since you are, generally, more optimistic than I am, of course, you still think integration in this manner is possible. I don't or rather it won't happen within the timeframe of life I have left on this planet.

I stated why I don't think so some time ago but, probably, because it was rather bitter and accusatory the post was deleted.
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