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Old 10-31-2018, 05:45 PM
 
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I am finally getting around to watching most of these. They're on youtube.
So well done!

The quality and scholarship in these documentaries make me sad, though, that Sam Katz(executive producer of the series) never became mayor. The Street years were 8 years of loss. Sigh! With Sam there would have been continuous progress from Rendell thru to Nutter.

Sam is a perfect example of a native who is absolutely in love with Phila. We native city lovers are out there!
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Old 10-31-2018, 08:04 PM
 
4,451 posts, read 1,692,436 times
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Originally Posted by kyb01 View Post
I am finally getting around to watching most of these. They're on youtube.
So well done!

The quality and scholarship in these documentaries make me sad, though, that Sam Katz(executive producer of the series) never became mayor. The Street years were 8 years of loss. Sigh! With Sam there would have been continuous progress from Rendell thru to Nutter.

Sam is a perfect example of a native who is absolutely in love with Phila. We native city lovers are out there!
I wanted to see more of these type of videos from the 1970's but it doesn't appear to be that many of them. Wish I could see some Action News clips of Jim Gardner from 1976-78 but only saw one when he was talking about Move confrontation in 1978.
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Old 11-01-2018, 05:28 AM
 
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Originally Posted by moneymkt View Post
I wanted to see more of these type of videos from the 1970's but it doesn't appear to be that many of them. Wish I could see some Action News clips of Jim Gardner from 1976-78 but only saw one when he was talking about Move confrontation in 1978.
I think there may be one about that period now.

My favorite ones are about the 19th century. You get a real sense of how it was, the industrial might, the immigrants, the row houses(!)

I also really like the one that starts in 1600 before Europeans showed up. From this one I learned about the Dutch who tried to colonize before the Swedes. I did not know that.
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Old 11-01-2018, 06:33 AM
 
Location: New York City
6,239 posts, read 5,570,825 times
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Originally Posted by kyb01 View Post
I think there may be one about that period now.

My favorite ones are about the 19th century. You get a real sense of how it was, the industrial might, the immigrants, the row houses(!)

I also really like the one that starts in 1600 before Europeans showed up. From this one I learned about the Dutch who tried to colonize before the Swedes. I did not know that.
Weren't the dutch the first in a lot of places? New York / New Amsterdam.
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Old 11-01-2018, 07:11 AM
 
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Originally Posted by cpomp View Post
Weren't the dutch the first in a lot of places? New York / New Amsterdam.
Yes, about NY. However they came here, to the mouth of the Delaware River, before that. Manhatta( Manhattan's original name) looked more promising.

I also learned from this doc. that a huge number of the Lenape died because of diseases from Europeans they had no immunity to. The same story that played out wrt other indigenous people and first contact with Europeans.

There are still Lenape in the Phila. area.
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Old 11-01-2018, 07:31 AM
 
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Can't emphasize enough how well done these documentaries are. Most are around 30 minutes or less.
From the actors, re-created scenes, graphics, maps, still photos, paintings, music/sound track. They, of course, have academics talking. A couple of them are so passionate, I felt swept up in what they were saying.
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Old 11-01-2018, 09:41 AM
 
Location: Center City
7,087 posts, read 8,218,872 times
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Originally Posted by cpomp View Post
Weren't the dutch the first in a lot of places? New York / New Amsterdam.
The Swedes came to the Delaware Valley first. The Dutch followed, but ultimately Penn and the English became the European settlers who established themselves here.

That’s my recollection. If I’m off a bit, Sandy can set me straight.
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Old 11-01-2018, 10:39 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Pine to Vine View Post
The Swedes came to the Delaware Valley first. The Dutch followed, but ultimately Penn and the English became the European settlers who established themselves here.

That’s my recollection. If I’m off a bit, Sandy can set me straight.
Not according to what the doc. says that starts in 1600: The Dutch came here first.

There are several docs. about yellow fever's impact on the city. Another really long one about how Catholics were welcomed here in way that they weren't in other places. Another using John Wanamaker as a back drop for how progressive Phila. was wrt his leadership using his innovative ideas about retailing as a kind of metaphor.

Basically what Katz has tried to do is present as complete a story of Philadelphia as he can in a factual but in an entertaining way.

And regarding Penn there is one about how he got control of so much land and how his relationship with the English monarchs brought that about. Penn was a kind of revolutionary...well, you probably know that.
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Old 11-01-2018, 10:49 AM
 
4,451 posts, read 1,692,436 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kyb01 View Post
I am finally getting around to watching most of these. They're on youtube.
So well done!

The quality and scholarship in these documentaries make me sad, though, that Sam Katz(executive producer of the series) never became mayor. The Street years were 8 years of loss. Sigh! With Sam there would have been continuous progress from Rendell thru to Nutter.

Sam is a perfect example of a native who is absolutely in love with Phila. We native city lovers are out there!
Just realized Sam Katz appears on Inside Story sometimes on Sunday mornings.
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Old 11-01-2018, 10:57 AM
 
Location: Center City
7,087 posts, read 8,218,872 times
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Originally Posted by kyb01 View Post
Not according to what the doc. says that starts in 1600: The Dutch came here first.

There are several docs. about yellow fever's impact on the city. Another really long one about how Catholics were welcomed here in way that they weren't in other places. Another using John Wanamaker as a back drop for how progressive Phila. was wrt his leadership using his innovative ideas about retailing as a kind of metaphor.

Basically what Katz has tried to do is present as complete a story of Philadelphia as he can in a factual but in an entertaining way.

And regarding Penn there is one about how he got control of so much land and how his relationship with the English monarchs brought that about. Penn was a kind of revolutionary...well, you probably know that.
Ok. The the Swedes were the first Europe settlers in Wilmington, not Philly. I was taught Delaware history and just conflated the two. I believe you, but I’m not the only person who has their history mixed up:

”The first European settlers on the site were Swedes, who established a community at the mouth of the Schuykill not later than 1643. England, however, established its control over the entire region, and in 1681, King Charles II made William Penn a grant of land that became Pennsylvania.”
https://www.u-s-history.com/pages/h2111.html
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