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Old 02-11-2020, 09:51 AM
 
Location: Center City, Philadelphia
4,846 posts, read 2,978,753 times
Reputation: 3151

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One of the former workers filmed some of the last days of operations there.
Refinery shouldn’t reopen, PES worker-turned-filmmaker says



Quote:
Motley says the Feb. 3 public screening of the film at the University of Pennsylvania changed his life. He’s received threatening messages from former coworkers, he said, and was ousted from a closed 759-member refinery workers Facebook group.
“For years, I held everything in — for nearly 15 years — trying to be the perfect coworker. I didn’t want to step out of line, trying to be … trying to conform. But I had to tell it,” he said from his new office in Center City. “I had to tell my truth and what I believed.”


About five years ago, he started noticing heavy rains and floods were happening more often. And every time those happened, untreated wastewater was being disposed of into the Schuylkill River.
“There’s been many times we’ve put oil into the river. Many times,” Motley said.
That was not done on purpose, he explained — during periods of heavy rain, the plant didn’t have the capacity to manage the wastewater.
“We had a really bad 2018. It was really bad,” he said. “We sent a lot of bad materials to the river on our Girard Point side.”
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Old 02-11-2020, 10:04 AM
 
Location: Center City, Philadelphia
4,846 posts, read 2,978,753 times
Reputation: 3151
Bankrupt PES says Philly refinery restart is a ‘fantasy’ and urges court to approve sale to developer



I mean the people who were running this place before understand that it would be a massive disaster if it reopened.
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Old 02-12-2020, 07:49 PM
 
Location: Chadds Ford
383 posts, read 163,898 times
Reputation: 385
Quote:
Originally Posted by thedirtypirate View Post
One of the former workers filmed some of the last days of operations there.
Refinery shouldn’t reopen, PES worker-turned-filmmaker says
As a former refinery worker (not this refinery, but one in the Philadelphia area), I don't disagree with him. The refineries in this area are old and have lived a full life. I can't help but compare it to an old car that people hold onto for sentimental reasons, even though the maintenance costs make ownership irrational. In PES's case, the car literally caught on fire and some people are still trying to revive it.

There are relatively new refineries elsewhere in the USA that, not only do they run a more profitable process, they include modern environmental controls and are further away from population centers. They have less fines, less externalities, lower labor costs and less maintenance.

In our polarized climate, the truth gets caught between most people's talking points. The USA still needs refineries, and will for at least a few more decades*. However, we shouldn't object to a refinery's natural death when it's no longer financially feasible.


*While electric cars are the future, most cars sold today run on an internal combustion engine, and those cars have a life-expectancy of 20 years. Refineries will be needed until those ICE cars are off the road, and beyond that, we will still need refineries to heat homes, fuel cargo ships, fuel airplanes, and turn out byproducts like asphalt (which we use for roads and roof shingles) and plastic.
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Old Yesterday, 07:45 AM
 
Location: New York City
6,104 posts, read 5,491,099 times
Reputation: 3214
Looks like Hilco officially won with an increased bid, thank goodness. I hope there isn't another appeal and we can just end this era and begin remediation on that wasteland.
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Old Yesterday, 09:04 AM
 
Location: Center City, Philadelphia
4,846 posts, read 2,978,753 times
Reputation: 3151
Quote:
Originally Posted by Patmcpsu View Post
As a former refinery worker (not this refinery, but one in the Philadelphia area), I don't disagree with him. The refineries in this area are old and have lived a full life. I can't help but compare it to an old car that people hold onto for sentimental reasons, even though the maintenance costs make ownership irrational. In PES's case, the car literally caught on fire and some people are still trying to revive it.

There are relatively new refineries elsewhere in the USA that, not only do they run a more profitable process, they include modern environmental controls and are further away from population centers. They have less fines, less externalities, lower labor costs and less maintenance.

In our polarized climate, the truth gets caught between most people's talking points. The USA still needs refineries, and will for at least a few more decades*. However, we shouldn't object to a refinery's natural death when it's no longer financially feasible.


*While electric cars are the future, most cars sold today run on an internal combustion engine, and those cars have a life-expectancy of 20 years. Refineries will be needed until those ICE cars are off the road, and beyond that, we will still need refineries to heat homes, fuel cargo ships, fuel airplanes, and turn out byproducts like asphalt (which we use for roads and roof shingles) and plastic.

Agreed.



It truly is amazing the place opened the year after the Civil War ended. It's time to build some warehouses and plant some trees, and see what kind of mutated creatures come out of the woods in a couple decades lol.
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Old Today, 08:53 AM
 
10,165 posts, read 5,852,889 times
Reputation: 3595
Quote:
Originally Posted by thedirtypirate View Post
Agreed.



It truly is amazing the place opened the year after the Civil War ended. It's time to build some warehouses and plant some trees, and see what kind of mutated creatures come out of the woods in a couple decades lol.
OT a little. This is one of the reasons Philadelphia in the 19th century interests me much more that the 18th century. The industrial might of Philadelphia and how many of its physical characteristics we are familiar with came about during those times. Big example. The number of row houses built.
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