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Old 04-23-2008, 06:17 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia
690 posts, read 2,769,449 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 310man View Post
I researched most of those suggestions and they seem really nice, but maybe a little too isolated for us coming from West LA.

Now, I'm not really familiar with the area, so could someone tell me which directions from Center City are good and bad. I know west isn't good, but if you go far enough west it is. How is it for going north and south. Not east, as I'd rather stay in PA.

Also, are there any upscale neighborhoods where rowhouses are common?
Center City basically consists of everything north of South Street and south of Spring Garden Street with the Delaware and Schuykill Rivers as the east/west boundaries. You can go further south than South Street and still be in nice areas (especially east of Broad St). I wouldn't go further north than Spring Garden though. North Philly is very dangerous.

As far as West of the Schuykill, the University City area is nice. You want to make sure you stay south of Market. For the western boundary, i'd draw a line from about 40th & chestnut southwest to about 44th & baltimore ave and would not go any further west than that.

I still think you will like the 19106 zip code the best tho.
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Old 04-23-2008, 06:17 AM
 
Location: Toronto
349 posts, read 896,547 times
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I live within a couple of blocks of most of these houses. It is a great neighborhood, walking distance to dozens of restaurants, several movie theaters (art and indie movies), galleries, shopping, etc. However, living in an 18th or 19th century townhouse would require quite an adjustment moving from California. Most have small city gardens; calling them back yards would be a stretch. Climbing stairs is a way of life. ( Think "buns of steel.") My house is on five floors, so getting a midnight snack means a journey of three floors each direction. All of my neighbors with school-age children send them to pirvate schools. Some houses have parking, some don't. If you're willing to adjust to an urban life-style, it's a great place to live. Send me a PM if you have any questions about the neighborhood.
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Old 04-23-2008, 07:25 AM
 
8,048 posts, read 18,469,927 times
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Now that I think of it...

Queens Village and Bella Vista are two neighborhoods south of Center City that might interest you. I also agree with the University City suggestion (west of Center City) although I'd extend the personal comfort boundary for a family to around 48th and south to Springfield Ave. You may find that the backyards are tiny, if existent at all; but in many city neighborhoods, the local parks become "everybody's backyard". You may not be able to grill anything (at least not with our a permit) but you'll have plenty of room to relax and allow your kids to let off some steam.

I would not recommend any neighborhoods north of Center City. Younger professionals and empty nesters are moving into gentrifying neighborhoods like Northern Liberties, Fishtown and Brewerytown but I would not suggest them for families.

I missed your budget the first time. With that amount, you would easily find homes in all the areas I've mentioned in this thread. Perhaps supply in Chestnut Hill would be limited. In Center City and University City in particular, you would be zoned for some of the better elementary schools in town: Greenfield in Center City (I think newmarlig once mentioned another one) and Penn Alexander in University City. The better high schools are few and competitive to enroll in. It will probably help if your kids get good grades in those aforementioned schools, test as gifted (to qualify for Masterman school) or benefit from your diligence in steering them into your/their preferred choice.
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Old 04-23-2008, 07:45 AM
 
2,189 posts, read 6,852,431 times
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You may also want to consider Fitler Square which is on the western end of Center City. One thing though - you will probably want to consider private school (for the upper grades) for your children if you live in the city. As Tone stated, Greenfield is an excellent public school (that is in the Fitler Square area). Another excellent school in the Society Hill area is McCall, and in Queen Village - Meredith.

FITLER SQUARE: a Philadelphia gem


Fitler Square Philadelphia Real Estate | PA Agents & Brokers
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Old 04-23-2008, 08:35 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia,New Jersey, NYC!
6,967 posts, read 18,558,445 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 310man View Post


those are awesome locations. they're residential but close to all the action. there's plenty to do. you'd have broad street and rittenhouse/art museum directly west and old city/south street/delaware river directly east. can't beat that. and they are very well preserved, quaint neighborhoods. with the exception of cabs racing down the narrow streets, you wouldn't think that you're in a big city.

you should try to find one with a roofdeck as well. we have one in queen village that overlooks the skyline. its the bomb during the summer. not sure if those washingon square/society hill homes are designed for them though.


Quote:
My house is on five floors, so getting a midnight snack means a journey of three floors each direction.
tell me about it! we're considering getting a mini fridge for the bedroom.

Last edited by john_starks; 04-23-2008 at 09:08 AM..
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Old 04-23-2008, 12:37 PM
 
Location: a swanky suburb in my fancy pants
3,391 posts, read 7,737,587 times
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There are several other nice neighborhoods that are not quite as nice that have been settled by people who couldn't afford Society Hill. (700-800K is alot for a house in Philadelphia even in the fanciest suburbs) Society Hill is the creme de la creme, if you can afford it why settle for less? One other point. This neighborhood began to gentrfy in the 1960's and didn't achieve premier status until the '80's. Many of these places might need updating as far as new kitchens and/or bathrooms and mechanicals.

This picture shows Society Hill circled in red



This map shows Society Hill in relation to other downtown and surrounding neighborhoods but this is all considered center city

Last edited by bryson662001; 04-23-2008 at 01:19 PM..
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Old 04-23-2008, 07:36 PM
 
38 posts, read 207,006 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bookmen View Post
I live within a couple of blocks of most of these houses. It is a great neighborhood, walking distance to dozens of restaurants, several movie theaters (art and indie movies), galleries, shopping, etc. However, living in an 18th or 19th century townhouse would require quite an adjustment moving from California. Most have small city gardens; calling them back yards would be a stretch. Climbing stairs is a way of life. ( Think "buns of steel.") My house is on five floors, so getting a midnight snack means a journey of three floors each direction. All of my neighbors with school-age children send them to pirvate schools. Some houses have parking, some don't. If you're willing to adjust to an urban life-style, it's a great place to live. Send me a PM if you have any questions about the neighborhood.
Well, the reason we are considering Philly, as well as other east coast cities (Boston, NYC, DC, and Chicago) is because we do want that urban lifestyle. I guess 19106 is our best choice and if the public schools aren't that good, i will send my kids to private schools as their education is second on our priority list after safety. Third is urban. A backyard isn't a necessity, but I was just imagining some other east coast cities that have small backyards. I guess Philly doesn't have them, but that's okay.

And, wow. I didn't realize Philly is that much of a bargain compared to other large cities.

What is the good zip code for University City? Or is there only 19104?
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Old 04-24-2008, 06:38 AM
 
8,048 posts, read 18,469,927 times
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Glad to hear that you're prepared and willing to enjoy urban living.

Many older East Coast cities were established when horsepower was the fastest mode of transportation. So the closer you get to downtown, the more dense the buildings and housing become. Conversely, I'm always amazed at how much space there is between homes on the West Coast, even close to their downtown areas. You can find larger plots of land in the city, you'll just have to travel towards the outskirts.

Yeah, Philly's always been a good deal compared to NYC and DC, although some former New Yorkers are influencing prices in Center City and up in Bucks County.

19104 is the only zip for University City, I believe. If you can find a place on the 4500 or 4600 block of Osage, I think you'll be particularly happy. It's like stepping into a suburb for a block or two.


Quote:
Originally Posted by 310man View Post
Well, the reason we are considering Philly, as well as other east coast cities (Boston, NYC, DC, and Chicago) is because we do want that urban lifestyle. I guess 19106 is our best choice and if the public schools aren't that good, i will send my kids to private schools as their education is second on our priority list after safety. Third is urban. A backyard isn't a necessity, but I was just imagining some other east coast cities that have small backyards. I guess Philly doesn't have them, but that's okay.

And, wow. I didn't realize Philly is that much of a bargain compared to other large cities.

What is the good zip code for University City? Or is there only 19104?
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Old 04-24-2008, 08:52 AM
 
3 posts, read 6,817 times
Reputation: 10
Post Queen Village

In the links you posted I see there is a listing on Delancey St. IMO Delancey street is the nicest street in Center City area.

Another option is Queen Village, if you look on the map bryson662001 provided, it's the next neighborhood south of Society Hill.
Here are some pics of the neighborhood:

Queen Village Neighbors Association (http://www.qvna.org/qv/photos1.htm - broken link)
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