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Old 03-19-2020, 06:39 AM
 
10,647 posts, read 6,230,850 times
Reputation: 3857

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Quote:
Originally Posted by cpomp View Post
It makes me sad when I think about how well Philadelphia was doing from a tourism standpoint (record hights), new hotels, restaurants, bars, etc. now all with uncertain futures. And there is so much construction in and around Center City, I sure hope these projects don't stall or die because of this...
There is still construction going on immediately near me adjacent to the 1500 Spring Garden Bldg. There are two retail spaces left one will be a Starbucks. And the Aldi project next to the Divine Lorraine on N. Broad, I saw people there yesterday. The W Hotel, 15th and Chestnut, is getting close to completion. Will it open? Who knows?
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Old 03-19-2020, 06:45 AM
 
5,546 posts, read 5,707,627 times
Reputation: 3787
Quote:
Originally Posted by selhars View Post
IF you were stocked up on everything you need -- for at least two weeks -- would you still go out and shop for food right now....OR use your in-house stock of produce and staples for two weeks, see what the next two weeks bring....and then go out and food shop?

I have at least two weeks worth of food (not including produce).
I'm curious about a shopping strategy....

I tend to be a pack rat and stocker-upper in general. So even before this issue hit, I had YEARS of trash bags, toilet paper and paper towels, tooth paste, cleaning supplies, laundry and dish detergent, copy paper for a printer stocked up. You name a non perishable, I've probably got plenty of it. (I have lots of storage space.)

I'm leaning toward staying in for at least a week and seeing what develops.
Running completely dry of everything is what fuels panic. I have enough food for about 2 months, but still need fresh fruit, vegetables and seafood. I wait until I am a few days from running out of the fresh stuff and then go get a reasonable amount to stay stocked. If I see that stuff is unavailable, I just look for alternatives. We cook just about everything, so if peppers are unavailable, we might switch to onions, leeks, garlic for leek soup instead of stuffed peppers, for example.

For the longer term stuff (wheat berries for baking, canned tomatoes for cooking, etc.), I stock up a couple weeks before I run out and, again, just restock in reasonable quantities. Being proactive keeps us calm and stocked, while also reserving enough for other families.
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Old 03-19-2020, 06:58 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia Pa
789 posts, read 500,049 times
Reputation: 746
Quote:
Originally Posted by kyb01 View Post
There is still construction going on immediately near me adjacent to the 1500 Spring Garden Bldg. There are two retail spaces left one will be a Starbucks. And the Aldi project next to the Divine Lorraine on N. Broad, I saw people there yesterday. The W Hotel, 15th and Chestnut, is getting close to completion. Will it open? Who knows?
The good news is that Philly has had for decades a fairly substantial housing and retail construction deficit, so we have some wiggle room with these new projects. More importantly, with rates at zero, I can actually envision this construction increasing rather than slowing. With a major global shake-up like this, we don't really know what business will look like when we come out of this. There is a possibility that companies move, new companies pop-up, etc..., and with our city having access to top talent in the NE, plenty of land for construction and geographically being in a great location, it might just fare better in the end than it is currently.
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Old 03-19-2020, 07:40 AM
 
Location: New York City
6,615 posts, read 5,823,607 times
Reputation: 3614
Quote:
Originally Posted by selhars View Post
IF you were stocked up on everything you need -- for at least two weeks -- would you still go out and shop for food right now....OR use your in-house stock of produce and staples for two weeks, see what the next two weeks bring....and then go out and food shop?

I have at least two weeks worth of food (not including produce).
I'm curious about a shopping strategy....

I tend to be a pack rat and stocker-upper in general. So even before this issue hit, I had YEARS of trash bags, toilet paper and paper towels, tooth paste, cleaning supplies, laundry and dish detergent, copy paper for a printer stocked up. You name a non perishable, I've probably got plenty of it. (I have lots of storage space.)

I'm leaning toward staying in for at least a week and seeing what develops.
I wouldn't wait until you are desperate as others said. I have about a week of food, but I take a walk everyday and usually stop in a market to see if there is any chicken or canned soup (usually no).

I also have been ordering a lot of delivery and take-out, while I still can and because I am not big on cooking. I also live alone, so taking a walk or picking up take-out is one of the only outlets during a time like this unfortunately.

But it sounds like you will be fine.

Quote:
Originally Posted by kyb01 View Post
There is still construction going on immediately near me adjacent to the 1500 Spring Garden Bldg. There are two retail spaces left one will be a Starbucks. And the Aldi project next to the Divine Lorraine on N. Broad, I saw people there yesterday. The W Hotel, 15th and Chestnut, is getting close to completion. Will it open? Who knows?
Good to hear. I posed the same question in a Philadelphia development group on FB and people said all of the major projects (The Laurel, Arthaus, etc.) are still chugging along.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pennsport View Post
The good news is that Philly has had for decades a fairly substantial housing and retail construction deficit, so we have some wiggle room with these new projects. More importantly, with rates at zero, I can actually envision this construction increasing rather than slowing. With a major global shake-up like this, we don't really know what business will look like when we come out of this. There is a possibility that companies move, new companies pop-up, etc..., and with our city having access to top talent in the NE, plenty of land for construction and geographically being in a great location, it might just fare better in the end than it is currently.
A very true possibility. Philadelphia is poised to resist the growing financial crisis quicker than other cities and regions.
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Old 03-19-2020, 07:42 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia, PA
950 posts, read 374,346 times
Reputation: 1214
Quote:
Originally Posted by PHL10 View Post
With this type of mind set at the top, it's no wonder PSD schools are for the most part (use whichever negative adjective you like).

Philly teachers told to halt remote instruction due to equity concerns
Philadelphia teachers may no longer offer remote instruction to students, according to a memo sent by the Philadelphia School District to principals Tuesday night.
“To ensure equity, remote instruction should not be provided to students, including through the internet, technology at home, by phone or otherwise,” said the memo, which was obtained by The Inquirer.
“Students should not be required to complete new assignments or homework activities. Schools may not make independent decisions to provide remote instruction at this time. As guidance and circumstances continue to unfold, we will provide updates as necessary.”

https://www.inquirer.com/health/coro...-20200318.html
Honestly, access to remote learning will be a HUGE problem and obstacle. Equity for students without internet at home is a huge issue. However, we obviously need an alternative. The mindset needs to be how to get these students access to remote learning, not shutting down learning entirely because there are some obstacles.
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Old 03-19-2020, 07:45 AM
 
10,647 posts, read 6,230,850 times
Reputation: 3857
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pennsport View Post
The good news is that Philly has had for decades a fairly substantial housing and retail construction deficit, so we have some wiggle room with these new projects. More importantly, with rates at zero, I can actually envision this construction increasing rather than slowing. With a major global shake-up like this, we don't really know what business will look like when we come out of this. There is a possibility that companies move, new companies pop-up, etc..., and with our city having access to top talent in the NE, plenty of land for construction and geographically being in a great location, it might just fare better in the end than it is currently.
On N. 16th St , near Mt Vernon, Wallace and North Sts. , a few projects are either completed or almost. It's astounding to me because less than 10 years that area up to Fairmount Ave. was pretty much a " no go".
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Old 03-19-2020, 09:04 AM
 
266 posts, read 138,664 times
Reputation: 356
For a family of four, I've been getting groceries delivered. You just have to understand the available delivery times will more than likely be at least a week out and not everything you ask for will be available, so plan accordingly. There are lots of options to choose from.
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Old 03-19-2020, 09:17 AM
 
101 posts, read 28,318 times
Reputation: 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pennsport View Post
The good news is that Philly has had for decades a fairly substantial housing and retail construction deficit, so we have some wiggle room with these new projects. More importantly, with rates at zero, I can actually envision this construction increasing rather than slowing. With a major global shake-up like this, we don't really know what business will look like when we come out of this. There is a possibility that companies move, new companies pop-up, etc..., and with our city having access to top talent in the NE, plenty of land for construction and geographically being in a great location, it might just fare better in the end than it is currently.
Eh. Meh. Who knows. A severe recession is a likely outcome at this point. Philadelphia won't be immune. When there is a severe recession housing prices fall. They always do.

Different areas will be hurt more than others. But no one knows how this whole thing will play out. The shutdown for up to six months will cripple the restaurant/hotel industry in the city. And that's a big part of the city's finances. Tax revenues must be drying up overnight and that is scary. The city suddenly doesn't have its usual budget, and needs to spend more money on health programming due to the virus, means all non essential projects are delayed/cancelled, which means all the consulting and construction firms on everything from schools to roads see projects cancelled and future tendering cancelled. That's more and more people without work as companies scale back. And city employees laid off. Who in turn scale back on spending. And delay home purchases. Or fall into foreclosure.

A sharp contraction is unavoidable at this point. We're all hoping for a a sharp rebound. "Everyone" says the virus vaccine is up to 18 months away (at this point I think it's less than that given the sheer focus and resources globally towards vaccine/health treatment and some emerging promising signs on some kind of potential treatments to mitigate the impact of the virus). But one way or another we know there's an end in sight and that's encouraging on its own.

Things are going to be scary, economically and health-wise, for the next few months. But ain't much you can do about it but remain calm and carry on.
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Old 03-19-2020, 09:50 AM
 
Location: The City of Brotherly Love
1,166 posts, read 843,446 times
Reputation: 2916
As an active, extroverted 24 year old, the closure of non-essential businesses really hurts. I'm the kind of people who absolutely abhors staying indoors. The fact that I can't grab drinks with buddies, do karaoke, take my girlfriend on a date, or any of the other activities that I enjoy brings me down. I get that it is essential to slowing the spread, and I can't be mad to that extent, but I am feeling really down.

I also had to cancel my girl and I's first ever international trip, which we were supposed to take in early April. :/
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Old 03-19-2020, 10:19 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia Pa
789 posts, read 500,049 times
Reputation: 746
Quote:
Originally Posted by DXBtoFL View Post
Eh. Meh. Who knows. A severe recession is a likely outcome at this point. Philadelphia won't be immune. When there is a severe recession housing prices fall. They always do.

Different areas will be hurt more than others. But no one knows how this whole thing will play out. The shutdown for up to six months will cripple the restaurant/hotel industry in the city. And that's a big part of the city's finances. Tax revenues must be drying up overnight and that is scary. The city suddenly doesn't have its usual budget, and needs to spend more money on health programming due to the virus, means all non essential projects are delayed/cancelled, which means all the consulting and construction firms on everything from schools to roads see projects cancelled and future tendering cancelled. That's more and more people without work as companies scale back. And city employees laid off. Who in turn scale back on spending. And delay home purchases. Or fall into foreclosure.

A sharp contraction is unavoidable at this point. We're all hoping for a a sharp rebound. "Everyone" says the virus vaccine is up to 18 months away (at this point I think it's less than that given the sheer focus and resources globally towards vaccine/health treatment and some emerging promising signs on some kind of potential treatments to mitigate the impact of the virus). But one way or another we know there's an end in sight and that's encouraging on its own.

Things are going to be scary, economically and health-wise, for the next few months. But ain't much you can do about it but remain calm and carry on.
Yes, agreed. Difficult to tell the scope of this right now, but regardless, I really don't think Philly will be hit as hard as many other cities/areas. At least I'm hoping so. lol...

Regarding medicine, an anti-viral should come before a vaccine, which will hopefully be able to effectively stunt the spread. In fact one is already approved and in use in China and it looks to have pretty solid safety and efficacy at this time.
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