U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Pennsylvania > Philadelphia
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 04-15-2009, 10:35 AM
 
1,983 posts, read 6,843,384 times
Reputation: 411

Advertisements

My post is brilliant. It is what it is. The region as a whole benefits and eastern PA's only real chance at growth is relocated folks from the NE looking for cheaper housing and taxes. That's another reason why the future of the Main Line may not be so bright, the trend is for smaller homes and more reasonably sized mansions for the affluent.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-15-2009, 01:18 PM
 
2 posts, read 3,695 times
Reputation: 10
Thank you all for the information. We have a toddler so I want to be in a lower crime area that is geared toward families. The school system is definitely important, as are access to parks, pools, and other things to do as a family. We will have to live in an apt. I'm not used to dealing with winter weather/snow/sleet, so I don't want to have to drive far to go shopping. Obviously, we are more interested in lower tax areas. I like small town atmosphere. I hope that information helps!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-15-2009, 05:31 PM
 
5,969 posts, read 7,996,292 times
Reputation: 1614
Quote:
Originally Posted by rainrock View Post
As you can see South Jersey is least expensive and imo the quality of life reflects that..
I do not agree with this statement. I live in South Jersey and my quality of life is much better than many suburbs on the PA side. I also have better access to Center City (via PATCO) then most suburban PA towns. Some of my colleagues that live on the PA side have much longer commutes than I do. I think both the PA side and NJ side have alot to offer, it all depends what you prefer. I wanted a historic walkable town with easy access to center city. I found that in Collingswood.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-15-2009, 07:01 PM
 
1,983 posts, read 6,843,384 times
Reputation: 411
Bingo. And Septa sucks, my PA colleagues in center city always complain about it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-15-2009, 07:40 PM
 
Location: Boston Metrowest (via the Philly area)
4,745 posts, read 7,845,060 times
Reputation: 4700
Quote:
Originally Posted by MoorestownResident View Post
My post is brilliant. It is what it is. The region as a whole benefits and eastern PA's only real chance at growth is relocated folks from the NE looking for cheaper housing and taxes. That's another reason why the future of the Main Line may not be so bright, the trend is for smaller homes and more reasonably sized mansions for the affluent.
I didn't know the board was due for another South Jersey lovefest and Pennsylvania hatefest, but I'll take the bait nonetheless.

The Main Line is doing just fine -- it's still, and will continue to be, one of the most desirable places to live in the Delaware Valley.

However, although you certainly aren't wrong about about the trend for people looking for smaller sized home; homebuyers are ALSO starting to put more emphasis on living near urban cores and walkable communities, something that definitely gives the PA burbs a competitive advantage. This is not to say there are not urban, walkable communities in South Jersey, but they are certainly not nearly as common as they are in PA. Places like Phoenixville, Lansdale, Doylestown, Downingtown and yes, even Coatesville and Norristown, are on an upward trajectory of redevelopment as older communities with enormous potential.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MoorestownResident View Post
Bingo. And Septa sucks, my PA colleagues in center city always complain about it.
In all honesty, yes -- SEPTA can use some major improvements. However, there are lots of capital improvements in the works to expand service in the suburbs and refurbish subway stations in the city. At any rate, I would not underestimate the value of PA's extensive commuter rail system that is still FAR more accessible than PATCO.

Last edited by Duderino; 04-15-2009 at 07:56 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-15-2009, 08:07 PM
 
Location: Villanova Pa.
4,910 posts, read 12,771,485 times
Reputation: 2635
Quote:
Originally Posted by mom2jw09 View Post
Thank you all for the information. We have a toddler so I want to be in a lower crime area that is geared toward families. The school system is definitely important, as are access to parks, pools, and other things to do as a family. We will have to live in an apt. I'm not used to dealing with winter weather/snow/sleet, so I don't want to have to drive far to go shopping. Obviously, we are more interested in lower tax areas. I like small town atmosphere. I hope that information helps!
There are alot of nice apartment complexes in the Concordville/Glen MIlls/West Chester/East Goshen area.

This is about 30-50 minutes nw of the Airport. This is a fast growing area with little crime, good shopping and very good schools. Very nice atmosphere to live especially if you are looking for quiet family areas.

Two complexes that come to mind are Coventry at Glen Mills and Windsor at Brandywine. Google those 2 and google Apartments + Concordville,Glen Mills,West Chester that should get a good start.

Good luck.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-16-2009, 05:23 AM
 
1,983 posts, read 6,843,384 times
Reputation: 411
Quote:
Originally Posted by Duderino View Post
I didn't know the board was due for another South Jersey lovefest and Pennsylvania hatefest, but I'll take the bait nonetheless.

The Main Line is doing just fine -- it's still, and will continue to be, one of the most desirable places to live in the Delaware Valley.

However, although you certainly aren't wrong about about the trend for people looking for smaller sized home; homebuyers are ALSO starting to put more emphasis on living near urban cores and walkable communities, something that definitely gives the PA burbs a competitive advantage. This is not to say there are not urban, walkable communities in South Jersey, but they are certainly not nearly as common as they are in PA. Places like Phoenixville, Lansdale, Doylestown, Downingtown and yes, even Coatesville and Norristown, are on an upward trajectory of redevelopment as older communities with enormous potential.

Lastly, I remind you that Moorestown was ranked best place to live by Money and has one of the largest estates in the US builts within the past few years. If that doesn't make a statement and cement a flag in the ground for the region, nothing will.


In all honesty, yes -- SEPTA can use some major improvements. However, there are lots of capital improvements in the works to expand service in the suburbs and refurbish subway stations in the city. At any rate, I would not underestimate the value of PA's extensive commuter rail system that is still FAR more accessible than PATCO.
None of that will help the main line. Urban empty nesters will continue to help center city and some burbs on both sides of the Delaware. However, urbanites and few in particular want to live in Norristown, Lansadale or the towns you cite. They live there because that's where the job is.

The trend is for smaller construction and more energy efficient homes. The meltdown of 2008 was so historic, it will likely curtail spending and speculative excess for many years to come. Similar to the Great Depression, though not as dramatic. The appetite for the 5,000+ square foot house with 4+ car garage has become anemic, just ask anyone trying to sell one. Since that is what is mostly on the main line, it will languish relatively more than its SJ counterparts which offer a broader array of housing, more amenities in the local area, with easier access to center city and many other locations.

I know the main line is a huge, jaw-dropping big deal to those in PA, and I understand and respect that, plus I enjoy the character out there, but in reality, even the most desirable main line towns are falling out of favor to the more robust and dynamic affluence in NJ's wealth belt which runs along the I-295/95 corridor starting in South Jersey, on up through Princeton, and over toward the NYC burbs. People want location and mobility. The days of hiding in 10,000 square foot homes on a hill in a small PA town or elsewhere with the occasional trip to center city are over and have been for a long time. That's the primary reason Main Line towns have had to adapt over the years by tearing down old gems and converting others to mix-use properties. Many say this is hurting the main line's character.

Lastly, I remind you of the most recent and notable national accolades to the Philly region - Moorestown's best place to live ranking by Money, and one of the largest estates in the country recently built in town. If that doesn't make a statement and put a cement flag in the ground as to what's going on in our region, nothing will.

And Septa is horrible, yes it's more extensive but it has to be. Most NJ burbs are closer to center city with access by rail and four bridges. Plus SJ now has the new light rail line from the north that changes in Camden for center city access.

Last edited by MoorestownResident; 04-16-2009 at 06:51 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-16-2009, 06:04 AM
 
Location: Between Philadelphia and Allentown, PA
5,077 posts, read 13,327,939 times
Reputation: 3734
Well, if ya'll make it up here, then welcome but please keep in mind. Having lived down south most of my life you are going to find PA to be an expensive state. The places aforementioned around the airport are also expensive but less of a commute. I know plenty of people that live in Montgomery County that commute to Philly for their jobs.
Best of luck to you, be prepared for a slight culture shock, prices, personalities, getting around, etc...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-16-2009, 06:52 AM
 
Location: Boston Metrowest (via the Philly area)
4,745 posts, read 7,845,060 times
Reputation: 4700
Quote:
Originally Posted by MoorestownResident View Post

The trend is for smaller construction and more energy efficient homes. The meltdown of 2008 was so historic, it will likely curtail spending and speculative excess for many years to come. Similar to the Great Depression, though not as dramatic. The appetite for the 5,000+ square foot house with 4+ car garage has become anemic, just ask anyone trying to sell one. Since that is what is mostly on the main line, it will languish relatively more than its SJ counterparts which offer a broader array of housing, more amenities in the local area, with easier access to center city and many other locations.

I know the main line is a huge, jaw-dropping big deal to those in PA, and I understand and respect that, plus I enjoy the character out there, but in reality, even the most desirable main line towns are falling out of favor to the more robust and dynamic affluence in NJ's wealth belt which runs along the I-295/95 corridor starting in South Jersey, on up through Princeton, and over toward the NYC burbs. People want location and mobility. The days of hiding in 10,000 square foot homes on a hill in a small PA town or elsewhere with the occasional trip to center city are over and have been for a long time. That's the primary reason Main Line towns have had to adapt over the years by tearing down old gems and converting others to mix-use properties. Many say this is hurting the main line's character.

Lastly, I remind you of the most recent and notable national accolades to the Philly region - Moorestown's best place to live ranking by Money, and one of the largest estates in the country recently built in town. If that doesn't make a statement and put a cement flag in the ground as to what's going on in our region, nothing will.

And Septa is horrible, yes it's more extensive but it has to be. Most NJ burbs are closer to center city with access by rail and four bridges.
1.) I'm not denying that the the proximity to Center City in some parts of SJ is a big draw -- but amenities and proxmity to CC is also an advantage of PA's burbs, as well. Towns along Rte. 30, in particular, are in an extremely convenient location to commute to the city via rail. Also, since the vast majority of suburban jobs and retail destinations are found in PA, I don't necessarily understand the claim that SJ has this monopoly on amenities.

2.) Like ALL older, more established communities, the Main Line is undergoing a transition. Of course there will be some revamping (i.e., newer mixed-use development) that some contest take away from the older, quaint character. Yet, new development balanced with a good effort toward historical preservation is what will keep the ML vibrant. While there are some obscenely large properties that make up some ML communities -- no different than any other highly affluent suburban town like Greenwich, Scarsdale, McLean, or Beverly Hills -- it's not as though these are continually being built. These estates clearly serve a very limited upper-class niche market of homebuyers that are virtually unaffected by recessions, anyway. Also, as I had previously mentioned, the walkability, urban character, stellar public education, and proximity to public transportation is what will keep the Main Line a very desirable and sustainable place to live.

3.) I'd like to remind you that rankings are not always the most objective indicators. One town that would work perfectly for one family may not be the best option for another. However, that is not to say that the PA burbs do not have the same national recognition -- both Montgomery (#9) and Chester (#10) Counties (the only counties in the Philadelphia region) recently appeared on Forbes' Top 20 Counties in the country in which to raise a family based on 10 factors: cost of living, graduation rate, standardized scores, home price, property tax rate as a percentage of median home price, percentage of homes occupied by owner, per-capita income, air quality, crime rate and commute time.

In Depth: America's Best Places To Raise A Family - Forbes.com

That's also a pretty notable accomplishment, and I'm glad to say there are very desirable places to live on both sides of the Philadelphia region.

Last edited by Duderino; 04-16-2009 at 08:07 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-16-2009, 07:41 AM
 
Location: Montco PA
2,065 posts, read 4,290,092 times
Reputation: 1478
Moorestownresident is clearly a "homer," as his Northern New Jersey statesmen have said on the NJ threads.

Last edited by BPP1999; 04-16-2009 at 08:04 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Pennsylvania > Philadelphia
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top