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Old 05-27-2009, 04:24 PM
 
Location: Sanford, FL
596 posts, read 1,547,962 times
Reputation: 295

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Quote:
Originally Posted by pman View Post
1
I haven't heard that at all, in fact, I heard that the R6 extension (which is what the plan should have been all along) was being considered for ARRA funds [





I stand corrected as evidenced by the following info, however it looks like it'll be conservatively 5-7 years before ground is broken:

Schuylkill Valley Rail in the news february 21st, 2009
The Reading Eagle has an article about the latest study to extend rail service from Norristown up the Schuylkill River valley to Reading, PA in Berks County.

One idea for paying for both the initial construction and ongoing operating costs is to charge a $2 toll on Route 422, which would generate about $100 million in revenue over several years, according to the article.

Montgomery County transportation planners are moving ahead with plans to look at how to pay for passenger-train service between Norristown and Wyomissing. One option being considered is collecting tolls on Route 422. Here’s a look at the plan for the rail line, called the R-6 extension:

Where are the proposed stations? Wyomissing, Reading, Monocacy, Pottstown, Royersford, Phoenixville and Valley Forge.

What options for the rail line are under consideration? Planners are looking at seven options. All but one involves extending train service into Berks. Most are variations of electric and diesel trains between Berks and Montgomery counties.

What is the cost? A train line between Wyomissing and Norristown would cost $234 million to $297 million to begin the service, with annual operating costs of $5.4 to $7.4 million.

with 4 minute headways and two tracks I don't think this is possible. they should have buried the el in west philly and made it at least three tracks but they didn't.



4 minute headways are between "A" and "B' trains which do not make all stops. It's 8-10 minute headways from "A" to "A" and "B" to "B", which is a fundamental problem. I guess my point is why does SEPTA punish passengers at those stops during rush hour? If mixing express with regular service isn't viable, why not have all trains service all stops? All in all it seems another example of where SEPTA is geared more towards serving itself operationally versus it's passengers.
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Old 05-27-2009, 07:38 PM
 
Location: Silver Spring, MD/Washington DC
3,488 posts, read 8,320,057 times
Reputation: 2385
*Build new heavy transit lines in areas that have heavy bus ridership (like to Northeast Philadelphia near Roosevelt Boulevard for example)
*Build the proposed PATCO connection between the south end of the Broad Street Line and Glassboro, rather than having go through Camden
*Build a station at the location where the Northeast Corridor and Market-Frankford Line intersect and allow SEPTA R7 and NJT Atlantic City Line trains (and MFL trains) to serve the station
*Clean various subway stations, especially those on the Broad Street Line (like 15th Street for example)
*Extend service areas on various Regional Rail lines (like the R2 to Elkton, MD as an example)
*Install signage at Market East Station telling people how to get to the Philadelphia Greyhound Terminal
*Police the system more to discourage vagrants from hanging out at subway/rail stations
*Give most of the ticket booth workers training in how to act courteous

Some of these improvements would take some time and be very costly. However, they'd also be very beneficial.

SEPTA is working to acquire more Regional Rail cars and also is working to install a new farecard system similar to the SmarTrip card in DC. The Philly SmarTrip card, if SEPTA has its way, could be used on SEPTA, PATCO, and NJ Transit. Having said that, the current lack of ticket machines, both at heavy rail and Regional Rail stations, is absolutely ridiculous.

One recent improvement SEPTA implemented that they should be commended for is the regional day pass that allows unlimited rides on the entire SEPTA system after 9:30 AM on weekdays (and all day on weekends) for $10.
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Old 03-08-2011, 10:54 PM
 
1 posts, read 2,533 times
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I think a trolley line on city ave would be an excellent investment. Being a student at Saint Jo's it is very difficult to get up and down city ave. for a short trip.
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Old 03-09-2011, 08:09 AM
 
5,805 posts, read 8,768,810 times
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Philly better hope that what happening to PAT doesnt make its way to SEPTA...from what I hear, SEPTA is only able to balance its budget for another year with out state funding before it starts down the Road of Transit Cuts....

Maybe once SEPTA joins PAT then Corbett will be forced to pay attention to the Transportation Crisis in PA.
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Old 03-09-2011, 09:34 PM
 
Location: West Cedar Park, Philadelphia
1,225 posts, read 2,277,009 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackbeauty212 View Post
Philly better hope that what happening to PAT doesnt make its way to SEPTA...from what I hear, SEPTA is only able to balance its budget for another year with out state funding before it starts down the Road of Transit Cuts....

Maybe once SEPTA joins PAT then Corbett will be forced to pay attention to the Transportation Crisis in PA.
SEPTA doesn't have dedicated funding. They get a new budget each year from the state. We also have the boon of a much larger ridership base than Pittsburgh, and one that is growing, so we're harder to ignore. Corbett didn't announce any transportation or infrastructure cuts in the budget, but we'll see. Also, generally SEPTA's operating budget is backed up by fares, where they have been seeing increased revenue. That was a major point of contention in the last strike: revenue went up from increased ridership and the transit workers union wanted another raise to go along with it. What SEPTA relies on from the state is mainly for capital projects, which, like I said, weren't listed in the cuts Corbett made in the budget.

Oh, and PAT invested in that tunnel fiasco. I don't know what bearing that had on their budget crisis.
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Old 03-09-2011, 10:04 PM
 
5,805 posts, read 8,768,810 times
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It's been ingored so far and like you said Philadelphia doesnt have dedicated funding from PA either....so much for what that Larger and Growing ridership has done in Harrisburg....Remember until i-80 tolling was proposed SEPTA was crying right along with PAT about cutting transit and will be doing so again...so dont think that Philadelphia and SEPTA will be immuned for too long...

Plus this is Corbett a republican goverenor that neither Philadelphia or Pittsburgh voted for but he still managed to get into the governer seat...Rural PA doesnt want a dime going to mass transit and its Rural PA that put him in office not Philadelphia or Pittsburgh so who do you think he's gonna look out for????

Philadelphia could have 3 million in population it doesnt have the political power in Harrisburg to marginalize Rural PA voices and neither does Pittsburgh....

Be Very Affraid SEPTA riders....This is a dark time in PA.....that so-called Larger and Growing ridership is only buying you a year more time than what happening in Pittsburgh to Transit, and that only because SEPTA cut captial projects.

Last edited by Blackbeauty212; 03-09-2011 at 10:13 PM..
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Old 03-10-2011, 08:11 AM
 
Location: Philly
10,026 posts, read 14,483,472 times
Reputation: 2774
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marius Pontmercy View Post
SEPTA doesn't have dedicated funding. They get a new budget each year from the state. We also have the boon of a much larger ridership base than Pittsburgh, and one that is growing, so we're harder to ignore. Corbett didn't announce any transportation or infrastructure cuts in the budget, but we'll see. Also, generally SEPTA's operating budget is backed up by fares, where they have been seeing increased revenue. That was a major point of contention in the last strike: revenue went up from increased ridership and the transit workers union wanted another raise to go along with it. What SEPTA relies on from the state is mainly for capital projects, which, like I said, weren't listed in the cuts Corbett made in the budget.

Oh, and PAT invested in that tunnel fiasco. I don't know what bearing that had on their budget crisis.
the tunnel "fiasco" has little bearing on the budget. I think a lot of PAT's problems are historical. had they built the spine line linking their two largest job centers (think of center city and university city if they weren't linked by the subway surface trolleys and the el but only buses), there'd be a reasonable core of service that could provide good service at relatively low cost...but it didn't happen. Population patterns also haven't been kind. I'd be surprised if SEPTA has fewer employees now than historically, I don't think that's the case, which creates legacy cost problems (see GM). Historically, they are also more poorly run (I know, it's hard to believe, but their budget is far less transparent). At any rate, growing ridership has helped but it won't prevent SEPTA from having to make very tough capital decisions down the road. SEPTA's commuter rail network is NOT in a state of good repair.
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Old 03-10-2011, 11:04 AM
 
Location: On the Rails in Northern NJ
12,381 posts, read 23,934,837 times
Reputation: 4532
Quote:
Originally Posted by pman View Post
the tunnel "fiasco" has little bearing on the budget. I think a lot of PAT's problems are historical. had they built the spine line linking their two largest job centers (think of center city and university city if they weren't linked by the subway surface trolleys and the el but only buses), there'd be a reasonable core of service that could provide good service at relatively low cost...but it didn't happen. Population patterns also haven't been kind. I'd be surprised if SEPTA has fewer employees now than historically, I don't think that's the case, which creates legacy cost problems (see GM). Historically, they are also more poorly run (I know, it's hard to believe, but their budget is far less transparent). At any rate, growing ridership has helped but it won't prevent SEPTA from having to make very tough capital decisions down the road. SEPTA's commuter rail network is NOT in a state of good repair.
Septa could be as good as the MNRR / LIRR or NJT....instead most of its network is on the brink of collapse which is hurting SE PA. They need to address this problem hopefully this decade.... A Private company needs to step in like MTR and run Septa....
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Old 03-10-2011, 12:31 PM
 
Location: West Cedar Park, Philadelphia
1,225 posts, read 2,277,009 times
Reputation: 686
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nexis4Jersey View Post
Septa could be as good as the MNRR / LIRR or NJT....instead most of its network is on the brink of collapse which is hurting SE PA. They need to address this problem hopefully this decade.... A Private company needs to step in like MTR and run Septa....
SEPTA is privately run but relies on state money for capital projects. I suppose you could privatize the whole operation, which would be about the same as just cutting off all state money. How does this help exactly? You still have to deal with the transit workers union and an aging infrastructure that needs replacing. Where will you get the capital to do that?
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Old 03-10-2011, 01:33 PM
 
Location: On the Rails in Northern NJ
12,381 posts, read 23,934,837 times
Reputation: 4532
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marius Pontmercy View Post
SEPTA is privately run but relies on state money for capital projects. I suppose you could privatize the whole operation, which would be about the same as just cutting off all state money. How does this help exactly? You still have to deal with the transit workers union and an aging infrastructure that needs replacing. Where will you get the capital to do that?
MTR would help make Septa effiencent , thus a profitable transit agency. They also invest in alot of capital projects. MTR has taken over alot of Transit agencies around the world.
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