U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Arizona > Phoenix area
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 06-20-2011, 12:46 PM
 
Location: Gilbert Arizona
860 posts, read 2,544,941 times
Reputation: 1069

Advertisements

Poolman is the service provided for our rental home, and I have been impressed. Our pool went a bit green over Memorial day and the manager came out 3 days in a row to keep an eye on it. It is sparkling clear now.
When we are homeowners I will use Poolman, they do a very good job.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-20-2011, 02:28 PM
 
10,720 posts, read 18,856,040 times
Reputation: 9984
You need to get rid of the water. That happened to me a long time ago. I bought my first house when I was young kid and I made the rookie mistake of failing to manage my pool properly. It became a swamp and it was a running joke among my friends. Everyone gave me the wrong advice after that. They were trying to be nice instead of telling me the hard truth. They kept telling me to dump shock, acid and other chemicals. None of it worked. The only thing that worked was me going to a pool store, renting a small little pump and pumping the water out of the pool and refilling it. It wasn't that bad and I wished I had done it earlier. The pump at that time was only $20 bucks to rent. It took me a day to fill my pool with a standard pipe. I had to call the city to get a permit to dump the water if I recall and it was pretty cheap. The pump was easy to use. You just drop the pump into the pool, it falls to the bottom of the pool and it's connected to a long rubber hose that you then draw to the curb of your street. I did it at night so that it didn't attract a lot of attention. It didn't take that long to pump all of the water out (less than 8 hours). Then I called a pool service to provide and manage chemicals. You probably need to dump the water and start over. Think about it, even if you manage to clean that (you won't), do you really want to swim in that?

With pool services, there are two key things you need to look for: (1) They show up when they are supposed to (2) They do their job as advertised each time they come. We've had bad pool services where they don't show up every time after they have established care with you. And they begin to cut corners and not be thorough. To alleviate this, make sure whatever company you use leaves a paper ticket or some proof that they came that week. That's one of your only ways to make certain they come and if companies know they have to leave proof, they can't skip. With regard to thoroughness, that's a bit harder to note. You can ask them what is entailed in each service. You want a service that scrapes the sides of the pool with a brush, empties all of your baskets, backwashes the pool and removes surface debris IN ADDITION to managing chemicals. The bad services only want to manage chemicals and will often take shortcuts and avoid the other elements.

Last edited by azriverfan.; 06-20-2011 at 02:39 PM..
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-20-2011, 03:20 PM
 
5,546 posts, read 9,355,423 times
Reputation: 2792
Quote:
Originally Posted by azriverfan. View Post
You need to get rid of the water. That happened to me a long time ago. I bought my first house when I was young kid and I made the rookie mistake of failing to manage my pool properly. It became a swamp and it was a running joke among my friends. Everyone gave me the wrong advice after that. They were trying to be nice instead of telling me the hard truth. They kept telling me to dump shock, acid and other chemicals. None of it worked. The only thing that worked was me going to a pool store, renting a small little pump and pumping the water out of the pool and refilling it. It wasn't that bad and I wished I had done it earlier. The pump at that time was only $20 bucks to rent. It took me a day to fill my pool with a standard pipe. I had to call the city to get a permit to dump the water if I recall and it was pretty cheap. The pump was easy to use. You just drop the pump into the pool, it falls to the bottom of the pool and it's connected to a long rubber hose that you then draw to the curb of your street. I did it at night so that it didn't attract a lot of attention. It didn't take that long to pump all of the water out (less than 8 hours). Then I called a pool service to provide and manage chemicals. You probably need to dump the water and start over. Think about it, even if you manage to clean that (you won't), do you really want to swim in that?

With pool services, there are two key things you need to look for: (1) They show up when they are supposed to (2) They do their job as advertised each time they come. We've had bad pool services where they don't show up every time after they have established care with you. And they begin to cut corners and not be thorough. To alleviate this, make sure whatever company you use leaves a paper ticket or some proof that they came that week. That's one of your only ways to make certain they come and if companies know they have to leave proof, they can't skip. With regard to thoroughness, that's a bit harder to note. You can ask them what is entailed in each service. You want a service that scrapes the sides of the pool with a brush, empties all of your baskets, backwashes the pool and removes surface debris IN ADDITION to managing chemicals. The bad services only want to manage chemicals and will often take shortcuts and avoid the other elements.
Thanks, but I hope you are wrong (what I bolded). I just did that a couple of years ago. Fortunately, I was able to drain the entire pool into my yard over a period of a few days (and I think it helped my grass!) so I don't have to worry about permits or streets. I know the TDS is at 2100 and that is very high. I just want to get through one more season and then sell and then it will be someone else's pool to take care of.

I never swim in it nor does anyone else, so my main concern is that it just stay blue. And you are so right about these companies. I ask up front (or tell them up front) that I want it brushed down each week, etc, but I know they cut corners. I wish they would just charge what they really have to in order to do a thorough job. It costs an easy $100 to fix or more.

I figure one more algaecide treatment ought to work (I have to be an optimist here). That pool has been to the point of being pea green and I've turned it around before. It's not nearly that bad this time.

I do appreciate everyone's input in this thread and for anyone out there, don't let this happen to your pool!
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-20-2011, 03:35 PM
 
5,546 posts, read 9,355,423 times
Reputation: 2792
Quote:
Originally Posted by HX_Guy View Post
What part of the Valley are you in?

We've been using Bright and Clear Pool Care for literally like 3 years now and our pool always looks great. I would check them out if you're in the NW/Arrowhead area.

Bright and Clear Pool Care (http://www.supersavingsmagazine.com/couponprint33.html - broken link)
Thanks, I am on the other side of town. Appreciate the link though.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-20-2011, 03:43 PM
 
17,840 posts, read 39,629,897 times
Reputation: 10534
Quote:
Originally Posted by mistygrl092 View Post
Thanks, I am on the other side of town. Appreciate the link though.
Maybe if you call them, they can recommend someone on your side of the Valley. Just a thought.

Lots of good info on this thread. Sorry you are having a problem (makes me glad I have no pool), but this info will help others, too. Thanks, everyone, for your input so far!
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-20-2011, 03:46 PM
 
240 posts, read 779,102 times
Reputation: 396
Maybe your CYA is way high, so high that the amount of chlorine you are using is ineffective. With one of the larger kits from a pool place, you can test for CYA. The higher the CYA, the larger amount of chlorine needed (cite). If you find that chlorine is no longer effective, some people call this "chlorine lock" but there really isn't a lock. Rather there just isn't enough chlorine added to overcome the large amount of CYA in the pool. So where does CYA come from? If you use chlorine pucks, it gets in the pool water and accumulates (cite). To remove CYA from the pool means to remove water from the pool. If that is what you need to do, afterward switch to liquid chlorine. Get your pH right first, and then dump in liquid chlorine. No more pucks, tablets, or powders. HTHs.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-20-2011, 04:28 PM
 
5,546 posts, read 9,355,423 times
Reputation: 2792
Quote:
Originally Posted by dura View Post
Maybe your CYA is way high, so high that the amount of chlorine you are using is ineffective. With one of the larger kits from a pool place, you can test for CYA. The higher the CYA, the larger amount of chlorine needed (cite). If you find that chlorine is no longer effective, some people call this "chlorine lock" but there really isn't a lock. Rather there just isn't enough chlorine added to overcome the large amount of CYA in the pool. So where does CYA come from? If you use chlorine pucks, it gets in the pool water and accumulates (cite). To remove CYA from the pool means to remove water from the pool. If that is what you need to do, afterward switch to liquid chlorine. Get your pH right first, and then dump in liquid chlorine. No more pucks, tablets, or powders. HTHs.
Thanks, but the problem with liquid chlorine (I just discovered yesterday) is it really raises your TDS level and when that level gets high enough, nothing works and the pool has to be drained. BTW, Dec/Jan are the best months to drain a pool. I cannot believe how little it cost me to fill it back up in Jan. YES, it does matter when you use water here.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-20-2011, 09:16 PM
 
5,546 posts, read 9,355,423 times
Reputation: 2792
Oh, and I'm reading this and I should add, do not drain your pool before November. Otherwise, it can crack. Just thought I'd add this. AZ summers are rather unforgiving.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-20-2011, 11:02 PM
 
Location: the AZ desert
5,037 posts, read 8,498,658 times
Reputation: 8280
Quote:
Originally Posted by dura View Post
Maybe your CYA is way high, so high that the amount of chlorine you are using is ineffective. With one of the larger kits from a pool place, you can test for CYA. The higher the CYA, the larger amount of chlorine needed (cite). If you find that chlorine is no longer effective, some people call this "chlorine lock" but there really isn't a lock. Rather there just isn't enough chlorine added to overcome the large amount of CYA in the pool. So where does CYA come from? If you use chlorine pucks, it gets in the pool water and accumulates (cite). To remove CYA from the pool means to remove water from the pool. If that is what you need to do, afterward switch to liquid chlorine. Get your pH right first, and then dump in liquid chlorine. No more pucks, tablets, or powders. HTHs.
I agree. Well written post.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mistygrl092 View Post
Thanks, but the problem with liquid chlorine (I just discovered yesterday) is it really raises your TDS level and when that level gets high enough, nothing works and the pool has to be drained. BTW, Dec/Jan are the best months to drain a pool. I cannot believe how little it cost me to fill it back up in Jan. YES, it does matter when you use water here.
Every type of chlorine ends up contributing to TDS in the form of chloride.

The quickest and most efficient way of ridding the algae is to begin by knowing all of your numbers. Once you know them, you will know exactly what has to be done - without guessing and without wasting time or money in additives, electricity (pumping) or water replacement.

Please keep in the back of your mind that pool stores make their money selling you products. I'm not saying they are not reputable, but they are not necessarily providing the easiest, most cost effective ways of doing things.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-21-2011, 03:26 PM
 
5,546 posts, read 9,355,423 times
Reputation: 2792
Quote:
Originally Posted by CheyDee View Post
Every type of chlorine ends up contributing to TDS in the form of chloride.

The quickest and most efficient way of ridding the algae is to begin by knowing all of your numbers. Once you know them, you will know exactly what has to be done - without guessing and without wasting time or money in additives, electricity (pumping) or water replacement.

Please keep in the back of your mind that pool stores make their money selling you products. I'm not saying they are not reputable, but they are not necessarily providing the easiest, most cost effective ways of doing things.
Well, that's just what Leslie's told me - that liquid chlorine raises TDS levels more than the other forms. From now on I stay with the powdered non calcium based shock.

And, yes, pool stores do make their money off selling their products which I why I buy the Chem Tek at Lowes (the kill all algaedice kind). I was told by two different pool services that this is crap (and that they sell better stuff), but had my water analyzed today and the chemistry is perfect and pool is back to blue. Whew!

This is the last season though I can use this water and then it has to be drained again. Leslie's told me to drain it in March but I disagree. Temps can get high even in March and it didn't cost me over $100 to fill that pool back up in January.

Thanks for everyone's input and I do hope this was an informative thread for all. I do appreciate the links and they will be reading material going forward!

Last edited by mistygrl092; 06-21-2011 at 03:39 PM..
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Settings
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2020 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Arizona > Phoenix area
Similar Threads
View detailed profiles of:

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2021, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top